Beautiful churches
#61
(01-07-2011, 02:35 PM)moneil Wrote: Interesting contrasts in the “pre-renovation” picture: Fourth Degree Knights of Columbus Honor Guard in their ceremonial regalia (Gospel side, front pew), altar serves in the more traditional cassock and surplice, rather than the more typical servers alb, yet the congregation seems very informally dressed (shorts, even a tank top or two).  I did observe one woman with a scarf on her head, and perhaps one gentleman in a suite (difficult to tell from the back).  I might surmise the picture was taken at a Saturday night Mass, during summer.

No point to be made, just my observation  ;D .


(01-07-2011, 01:30 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: Holy Rosary Church, (Former) FSSP/diocesan church, Indianapolis, IN

Pre-renovation
[Image: holyrosary2004-large.jpg]

Yeah, that was at the Novus Ordo. 
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#62
To my knowledge, most churches in America have the Vatican and USA flag.  This may be an American phenomenon, because I don't recall Germans doing things like that.....  Aside from a few, where the former kingdom had their "stuff" put in stained glass windows and such.

One nifty thing, is in the ICKSP oratory, there is the Polish symbol... the flag and the eagle.  I'll get a pic of it in two months.. lol
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#63
Go back and read the Book of Revelation.
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#64
[quote='Petertherock' pid='675579' dateline='1294424233']
And the Cathedral in Portland, ME...

[Image: IMG_1302.jpg]

Basically a very beautiful cathedral, Peter, but it looks like somewhere along the line someone decided to "update" the sanctuary by going "monochrome".  By the basic architectural style, it looks to me as if the church was probably much more colorful - statues on either side of the main altar and in the clerestory are above are white, but something tells me they were originally polychrome with gilt details, possibly in niches painted "celestial blue".  I'd also be willing to bet that some of the non-iconographic details like the vault ribs and columns were multicolored - even more than currently - with some gilt details.

Just sayin as a one-time architecture major....but still a grand feast for the eyes!
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#65
(01-07-2011, 03:02 PM)dymphnaw Wrote: Go back and read the Book of Revelation.

What?
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#66
(01-07-2011, 02:50 PM)Petertherock Wrote:
(01-07-2011, 02:20 PM)Vivace Wrote:
(01-07-2011, 02:17 PM)Petertherock Wrote: [Image: IMG_1307.jpg]

Is hanging a flag in a church appropriate? I am just curious.

There is a flag in almost every Church I have been to. There is a US flag and a Vatican flag.

I love my country, but I consider myself first and foremost a Catholic.  Since my conversion from the Episcopal Church, I've not been completely comfortable with "Old Glory" displayed in my parish church - especilly considering the heavily Masonic influences behind the founding of our country.




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#67
(01-07-2011, 02:20 PM)Vivace Wrote: Is hanging a flag in a church appropriate? I am just curious.

Having the United States Flag and the Vatican Flag in U.S. Churches, one on each side of the sanctuary, was common before VII.  I’m assuming there may have been a protocol or perhaps even a rubric regarding on which side each was placed, but I don’t have a reference.  Out of curiosity I took a look at some current online pictures of TLM parishes, and noticed that the placement varied, even among different pictures of the same church.

Part of this custom, I believe, stemmed back to the days of the “immigrant church” in the U.S. where there was strong anti-immigration and anti-Catholic sentiment among not just extremists (ref. the “Know Nothings”, KKK, etc.) but also among the “natives” in general.  Catholic immigrants and the first generation often felt the need to publically demonstrate “patriotisms” in order to find acceptance, or at least tolerance.  The Knights of Columbus was particularly involved here (though I’m sure it was a “general movement” in the U.S. Church also), especially the Fourth Degree of the order.  If one were to research the matter, they likely would find that the U.S. and Vatican flags in most parishes were donated by the Knights.

I don’t have time to go find the citation at the moment, but when I was a parish business administrator (St. Patrick’s Pasco, WA, Diocese of Spokane, 1999 – 2002) I did research the matter, after a parishioner who was a military veteran, asked why the flags weren’t in the sanctuary anymore (they had been removed by a brash young assistant pastor, but were still in the sacristy).

As I said, I don’t have the information I found “at hand”; I believe it was an instruction from the USCCB’s liturgy office, though it may have been based on a Vatican directive also.

The instruction said that the Vatican flag, though technically the national symbol of the Vatican City State, was also emblematic of the Holy Apostolic See, and could appropriately be displayed in the sanctuary at any time, if a parish chose.

The instruction then said that the national flag of a country should not be on display in the sanctuary at all times (the Catholic Church is Universal, it transcends national allegiances, etc.).  However the national flag of the country could be displayed on days of prominent importance for a country.  In the United States these would include Memorial Day, Independence Day, Veterans Day, and Thanksgiving (including the Sundays before and after the holiday).  I believe that at the Funeral Mass for a public servant or military veteran the flag could be displayed in the sanctuary, as well as when a votive Mass was being offered for the country (an example might be when Masses were offered after 9/11).

This system has some merit, IMHO, in that indeed we are a universal, not a national, Church.  Also, by displaying the national flag at certain prominent times, it’s presence is noticed.  If it is “always there”, people tend to forget or not notice it.

My favorite story regarding “nationalism” and “the Church” was from my Peace Corps days in Colombia (1973-1976).  When I was in Bogota I would usually attend Mass (1969 missal) in English, at a school chapel.  Most of the congregation was expatriate, from an English speaking country (and also their Colombian spouses).  The choir director, who did a very good job, worked at the U.S. Embassy in Bogota.  On a Sunday on or around the Fourth of July the closing “hymn” was America the Beautiful.  At coffee after Mass the president of the board of directors (we weren’t a parish but a Catholic Association, recognized by the Archdiocese) congratulated the choir director on the excellent job he did, but there was one request:  Since we sang America the Beautiful on this Sunday, at times we should also sing God Save the Queen, the president being one of Her Majesty’s subjects.  The point was taken, and there were no more nationalistic songs sung at Mass.   ;D
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#68
(01-07-2011, 03:06 PM)AdOrientem Wrote: [quote='Petertherock' pid='675579' dateline='1294424233']
And the Cathedral in Portland, ME...

[Image: IMG_1302.jpg]

Basically a very beautiful cathedral, Peter, but it looks like somewhere along the line someone decided to "update" the sanctuary by going "monochrome".  By the basic architectural style, it looks to me as if the church was probably much more colorful - statues on either side of the main altar and in the clerestory are above are white, but something tells me they were originally polychrome with gilt details, possibly in niches painted "celestial blue".  I'd also be willing to bet that some of the non-iconographic details like the vault ribs and columns were multicolored - even more than currently - with some gilt details.

Just sayin as a one-time architecture major....but still a grand feast for the eyes!

I do remember hearing that this cathedral was indeed wreckovated several years ago...I believe one thing they did was move the tabernacle behind the altar. The tabernacle is behind the sanctuary against the wall where the stain glass window is.

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#69
St. John Cantius
Chicago, IL
[Image: SJC-FP09-Web-0005.jpg]


Ottobueren Monastary
Germany

[Image: ottobeuren01.jpg]
[Image: 800px-BasilikaOttobeurenHauptschiff02.JPG]

Blessed Sacrament
Kansas City, KS
[Image: 07HM_ELEV_HOST_65.jpg]
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#70
I call these beautiful Churches simply, "Catechism in Stone."
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