blood clot
#11
:pray2:
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#12
You need to address your underlying condition...

OK OK OK
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#13
Thank you all.

(11-14-2010, 11:50 AM)Scipio_a Wrote: You need to address your underlying condition...

OK OK OK

If I understand you correctly, I believe that is the plan but those tests will have to wait until at least a month after I come off the anticoagulants (mid June).
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#14
I received the news Friday that I have the Factor V Leiden genetic mutation.

So far, 2011 has been a real hoot.  ::)
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#15
What does this mean? Factor V?
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#16
(11-13-2010, 04:42 PM)Beware_the_Ides Wrote: this has me pondering the 4 last things and realizing what a rotten person I am who is infinitely unworthy of salvation

How true! This is a grace from God. Don't waste it.

It's an opportunity to ammend your life and grow in virtue. How fragile we are! Apart from God, we can do nothing.

:pray:
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#17
:pray2:
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#18
(01-18-2011, 03:29 PM)Jacafamala Wrote: What does this mean? Factor V?
I've only begun to investigate myself:
Quote:Factor V Leiden (sometimes factor VLeiden) is the name given to a variant of human factor V that causes a hypercoagulability disorder. In this disorder the Leiden variant of factor V cannot be inactivated by activated protein C.[1] Factor V Leiden is the most common hereditary hypercoagulability disorder amongst Eurasians.[2][3][4] It is named after the city Leiden (Netherlands), where it was first identified in 1994 by Prof R. Bertina et al.[5]

Studies have found that about 5% of Caucasians in North America have factor V Leiden. The disease is less common in Hispanics and African-Americans and is extremely rare in people of Asian descent.

Up to 30% of patients who present with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism have this condition. The risk of developing a clot in a blood vessel depends on whether a person inherits one or two copies of the factor V Leiden mutation. Inheriting one copy of the mutation from a parent (heterozygous) increases by fourfold to eightfold the chance of developing a clot. People who inherit two copies of the mutation (homozygous), one from each parent, may have up to 80 times the usual risk of developing this type of blood clot.[8] Considering that the risk of developing an abnormal blood clot averages about 1 in 1,000 per year in the general population, the presence of one copy of the factor V Leiden mutation increases that risk to 1 in 125 to 1 in 250. Having two copies of the mutation may raise the risk as high as 1 in 12.

They still want to test for other abnormalities but will have to wait until I come off of the blood thinning medication, Warfarin:

Quote:Warfarin (also known under the brand names Coumadin, Jantoven, Marevan, Lawarin, and Waran) is an anticoagulant. It was initially marketed as a pesticide against rats and mice and is still popular for this purpose, although more potent poisons such as brodifacoum have since been developed.

Things could still be worse. 
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#19
(01-18-2011, 03:32 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(11-13-2010, 04:42 PM)Beware_the_Ides Wrote: this has me pondering the 4 last things and realizing what a rotten person I am who is infinitely unworthy of salvation

How true! This is a grace from God. Don't waste it.

It's an opportunity to ammend your life and grow in virtue. How fragile we are! Apart from God, we can do nothing.

:pray:

You're right.  Thanks for the reminder.

It does keep me in the habit of frequent confessions and striving to remain in a state of sanctifying grace.

I try to tell myself its really not that bad.  I've read it is a "common" condition that affects 5% of the population (I wonder what percentage is "uncommon"); however, negative thoughts tend to creep in.
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#20
Okay well, let's hope for the best.  :pray2:

"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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