Meatless Friday Question
#41
(11-19-2010, 05:46 PM)INPEFESS Wrote:
(11-19-2010, 05:29 PM)Pax et Bonum Wrote:
(11-19-2010, 05:26 PM)INPEFESS Wrote:
(11-19-2010, 01:43 PM)Pax et Bonum Wrote: Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops:

We may also substitute other good actions for abstinence from meat. These could include . . . taking part in a service of worship with others . . .

???

:shame:

I completely missed that. That is a poor example,

Poor example? Hmmm. It's downright Modernist.

I know a "traditional" Catholic who put this exhortation into practice by celebrating Yom Kippur with the Jews. This is perfectly acceptable in my diocese.

But as you know, the Jews have the Day of Atonement to make reparation for sin; we have the Mass.

Quote: unless you went to Mass for that participation.

Pax,

You seem to have traditional inclinations which is very commendable.  I agree that this substitution language sounds extremely modernist.  I am 38, which I suppose is considerably older than you.  I started beginning to learn about tradition from old Catechisms my parents had around the house at about age 12 or 13.  I was very interested in tradition, but, unfortunately, was not aware of anyone else who was.  I went through my teens and into early adulthood feeling like tradition was lost forever.  But soon I started imposing traditional practices upon myself.

The suggestion to go obtain and follow and OLD Baltimore Catechism is good advice--that's what I did as a young man.  You're more fortunate than I was because you have access to trad forums such as this.  You shouldn't feel you're alone in your trad leanings, as I did.  Keep grounded that the new way of doing things is inferior to the traditional ways.  The Lord built his Church on a Rock.  A Rock is steady, unshakeable, and unchanging.  The changes are an abominable bastardization of Christ's Church--but it is still Christ's Church.  Hopefully, for the welfare of souls, the hierarchy will see irreverance, sinfulness, etc. atrocities inherent in, and facilitated by, these modernist changes.

I encourage you to find a traditional conservative NO parish that offers the Latin Mass, or an SSPX chapel.  If you're not around trad types, you probably don't know that there are plenty of people of both genders out there who share wholesome traditional Catholic views of life, Church, family, etc., across the board.  This is hopefully of interest to you, if you're in the age range I'd guess.

Don't do everything the New way says you CAN.  Stick with stricter tradition.  I confessed not keeping fast on an Ember Day.  My NO confessor explained that's no longer "required." I politely said I knew better than to break the fast. 

Absolutely.
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#42
(11-19-2010, 03:29 PM)Petertherock Wrote:
(11-19-2010, 03:23 PM)Grasshopper Wrote: I'm confused. Is this a Canadian thing or a trad thing? As far as I know, in the US the only days when abstinence is required are Ash Wednesday and Fridays during Lent. I regularly eat meat on Fridays during the rest of the year, and I'm not aware that there's anythign wrong with that. I think abstinence on regular Fridays might be suggested, but I'm pretty sure it's not required (at least not in the US). Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong. I'm not being a wise guy here, just legitimately confused.

Abstinence from meat on all Friday's is the preferred form of penance. However, the Church allows you to substitute another act of penance if you wish. The mistake most people in the NO Church make is they think they don't have to do anything special on Friday's and it just is another day.

7 yrs of NO elementary school and 5 yrs of NO CCD, and I was never taught this.  I learned this at about age 22 around 1994 from reading the 1992 Catechism.  I was talking about this very point of how this isn't taught well with my NO priest recently, and he told about a priest several yrs ago being scolded by a bishop for sternly teaching this.

Some doubt or Lord is present in NO sacramets--I do not.  I only doubt it is a re-presentaion.  As irreverent as it frequently is it seems more like crucifixion anew!
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#43
on meatless friday, is it permissible for catholics to eat ice cream?
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#44
(11-20-2010, 12:03 AM)Scipio_a Wrote: on meatless friday, is it permissible for catholics to eat ice cream?


:laughing:

First Vetus becomes Credo and now you become icecream. What next? Should I pretend to be glgas?
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#45
And this all changed with feminist vegitarian who demanded that fish have the rights of peole and the US forced this view on the Phillipeans.  Fish as meat is just a cover for green feminist vegetarians to covertly ruin science fiction with their ideas.
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#46
(11-19-2010, 08:36 PM)OHCA Wrote:
(11-19-2010, 05:46 PM)INPEFESS Wrote:
(11-19-2010, 05:29 PM)Pax et Bonum Wrote:
(11-19-2010, 05:26 PM)INPEFESS Wrote:
(11-19-2010, 01:43 PM)Pax et Bonum Wrote: Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops:

We may also substitute other good actions for abstinence from meat. These could include . . . taking part in a service of worship with others . . .

???

:shame:

I completely missed that. That is a poor example,

Poor example? Hmmm. It's downright Modernist.

I know a "traditional" Catholic who put this exhortation into practice by celebrating Yom Kippur with the Jews. This is perfectly acceptable in my diocese.

But as you know, the Jews have the Day of Atonement to make reparation for sin; we have the Mass.

Quote: unless you went to Mass for that participation.

Absolutely.
Pax,

You seem to have traditional inclinations which is very commendable.  I agree that this substitution language sounds extremely modernist.  I am 38, which I suppose is considerably older than you.  I started beginning to learn about tradition from old Catechisms my parents had around the house at about age 12 or 13.  I was very interested in tradition, but, unfortunately, was not aware of anyone else who was.  I went through my teens and into early adulthood feeling like tradition was lost forever.  But soon I started imposing traditional practices upon myself.

The suggestion to go obtain and follow and OLD Baltimore Catechism is good advice--that's what I did as a young man.  You're more fortunate than I was because you have access to trad forums such as this.  You shouldn't feel you're alone in your trad leanings, as I did.  Keep grounded that the new way of doing things is inferior to the traditional ways.  The Lord built his Church on a Rock.  A Rock is steady, unshakeable, and unchanging.  The changes are an abominable bastardization of Christ's Church--but it is still Christ's Church.  Hopefully, for the welfare of souls, the hierarchy will see irreverance, sinfulness, etc. atrocities inherent in, and facilitated by, these modernist changes.

I encourage you to find a traditional conservative NO parish that offers the Latin Mass, or an SSPX chapel.  If you're not around trad types, you probably don't know that there are plenty of people of both genders out there who share wholesome traditional Catholic views of life, Church, family, etc., across the board.  This is hopefully of interest to you, if you're in the age range I'd guess.

Don't do everything the New way says you CAN.  Stick with stricter tradition.  I confessed not keeping fast on an Ember Day.  My NO confessor explained that's no longer "required." I politely said I knew better than to break the fast. 

^ There, that looks better.
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