Jesuit Worships the God Shiva With Ravi Shankar
#11
(12-17-2010, 04:19 PM)3Sanctus Wrote:
(12-17-2010, 03:27 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Unlike Bp. Williamson, these clerics are "Catholics in the proper sense".

Oh man, I was hoping for an impersonation!  ;)

Credo's?
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#12
(12-17-2010, 04:21 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(12-17-2010, 04:19 PM)3Sanctus Wrote:
(12-17-2010, 03:27 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Unlike Bp. Williamson, these clerics are "Catholics in the proper sense".

Oh man, I was hoping for an impersonation!  ;)

Credo's?

Perhaps...  :laughing:
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#13
(12-17-2010, 04:30 PM)3Sanctus Wrote:
(12-17-2010, 04:21 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(12-17-2010, 04:19 PM)3Sanctus Wrote:
(12-17-2010, 03:27 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Unlike Bp. Williamson, these clerics are "Catholics in the proper sense".

Oh man, I was hoping for an impersonation!  ;)

Credo's?

Perhaps...   :laughing:

That would be inconvenient now that he's gone.
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#14
(12-17-2010, 02:54 PM)SouthpawLink Wrote: From  http://mumbailaity.wordpress.com/ (the link of which is found in The Eponymous Flower article)

Quote:Fr. Jegath Gaspar Raj, a Catholic priest, founder of Tamil Maiyam, an organisation with the stated aim of the promotion of Tamil arts, literature and culture, joins hands with Tamil maestro Ilaiyaraaja to produce a music audio of Thiruvasagam, a set of verses written by Manickavasagar, a 13th century devotee of Shiva in praise of the Hindu god.

...

Fr. Jegath has also used the students, not a few of them Catholics, of the Loyola College, Stella Maris College, and some convent schools for campaigning and for dance and drama performances, including the Thiruvasagam release function, where obeisance was paid to Shiva. “The involvement of the Catholic Church in the project was a great service to India” says Mr. N. Ram, the editor-in-chief of The Hindu.

Fr. Jegath “assured that most of the churches and catholic organizations were in support of him in this project and he mentioned that his bishop had really appreciated him for doing this project, as inter-religious dialogue was one of the duties of a catholic priest for maintaining religious harmony”.

Fr. Jegath participates in Sri Sri Ravi Shankar’s Art of Living Foundation programs along with the godman, and also promotes yoga through Tamil Maiyam. Catholic sound studios are used for inter-religious purposes such as the projection of spiritual music dedicated to the ‘Divine’ Mother of the Aurobindo Ashram, Pondicherry.

Tamil Maiyam and Fr. Jegath insist that they are committed to the promotion of ARTS and CULTURE, but the priest himself, and all media reports stress the fact that Thiruvasagam is a SPIRITUAL endeavour.

Fr. Jegath Gaspar Raj, who is “bothered” by “the revival of evangelism”, speaks of his “karma”, himself accepts “Manickavasagar helped me to find my own God in Thiruvasagam”; “I salute the one that is called Siva in the south, but known as God throughout the world.” He is proud that, even though he is a Catholic priest, temples of the deities Shiva and Murugan belong to him.

The primary questions addressed to the Bishops are, therefore, if this is the calling of Catholic priests, if this is what priests and Church facilities are now expected to be dedicated to [in the name of “inter-religious harmony and dialogue” and “collaboration”], that they openly and with impunity propagate devotion to “other gods” [see First Commandment] instead of preaching the Gospel and witnessing to Jesus Christ. He teaches that ‘love is God’, which is not Scriptural.

The above article is said to have originally come from www.ephesians511.net so I don't know exactly how trustworthy it is (although to be clear, given modern-day ecumenism, I wouldn't put such activities past some of today's priests).

They wrote the Indian and Sri Lankan Bishops individually and got three responses.  Check out the link for yourself:

http://www.ephesians-511.net/articles_do...ISHOPS.doc
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#15
Makes sense to me. Didn't John Paul II have the ashes of burnt cow dung smeared on his head (vibhut) which is related to the cult goddess Shiva -  which expressly contradicted a 1792 directive from the Holy See. The apple doesn't fall far from the tree (of Vatican II).
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#16
(12-17-2010, 09:42 PM)OldMan Wrote: Makes sense to me. Didn't John Paul II have the ashes of burnt cow dung smeared on his head (vibhut) which is related to the cult goddess Shiva -  which expressly contradicted a 1792 directive from the Holy See. The apple doesn't fall far from the tree (of Vatican II).

Is there a site I can go to in order to read it?

Augstine Baker,
Thank you.
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#17
(12-17-2010, 09:52 PM)SouthpawLink Wrote:
(12-17-2010, 09:42 PM)OldMan Wrote: Makes sense to me. Didn't John Paul II have the ashes of burnt cow dung smeared on his head (vibhut) which is related to the cult goddess Shiva -  which expressly contradicted a 1792 directive from the Holy See. The apple doesn't fall far from the tree (of Vatican II).

Is there a site I can go to in order to read it?

Augstine Baker,
Thank you.

Not yet.  Seems to originate with the ephesians site.
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