Forget about earlier thread
#11
I bet Cardinal Burke doesn't read Maxim either; how would he know if a trashy magazine lied about him?
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#12
Well, I thought this was a true story, but if it is not then I would like for this thread to be taken down. I'm sorry I posted it
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#13
(12-22-2010, 04:17 PM)faith3faith Wrote: Well, I thought this was a true story, but if it is not then I would like for this thread to be taken down. I'm sorry I posted it

I would very much like to know if you do find any evidence about this, since if this can be substantiated it's a serious matter, but I have a hard time accepting this - especially since others here whose judgment I tend to find satisfactory have seen it before and haven't seen evidence.
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#14
Obviously this is a liberal rag with an axe to grind against now Cardinal Burke, however, depending on certain facts, I don't know if it is necessarily as bad as it is made out, even if it is substantially true. It seems the person in question, if he had undergone such an operation, now considers such action gravely disordered and has desired to take up a life of discipline. This is not a religious order, but an association of the faithful according to Burke's quote.

This is also a two person association. Perhaps, Green wanted someone for accountability purposes and a man might be an occasion of sin or something. It depends what the statutes say and what this association will actually be doing. It's one thing for a person with disordered passions, etc. to be in a clerical position, be around kids, or even be an actual consecrated religious--it's another to live a life of discipline with the approval of the bishop. There's a lot of other facts that are missing too obviously and who knows what in the article is actually true. There's also probably a lot of sensitive issues we don't know, especially psychologically but also in regards to physical appearance, etc., involved which needed to be handled in a certain manner and it would definitely not be surprising if there was perhaps some error in judgment involved in such a delicate matter (no one is perfect).

Generally though, I don't think it's in itself a bad thing for someone who may have had such surgery, but now repents of it to live according to the rule of an association of the faithful.
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#15
(12-22-2010, 05:00 PM)SaintSebastian Wrote: Obviously this is a liberal rag with an axe to grind against now Cardinal Burke, however, depending on certain facts, I don't know if it is necessarily as bad as it is made out, even if it is substantially true. It seems the person in question, if he had undergone such an operation, now considers such action gravely disordered and has desired to take up a life of discipline. This is not a religious order, but an association of the faithful according to Burke's quote.

This is also a two person association. Perhaps, Green wanted someone for accountability purposes and a man might be an occasion of sin or something. It depends what the statutes say and what this association will actually be doing. It's one thing for a person with disordered passions, etc. to be in a clerical position, be around kids, or even be an actual consecrated religious--it's another to live a life of discipline with the approval of the bishop. There's a lot of other facts that are missing too obviously and who knows what in the article is actually true. There's also probably a lot of sensitive issues, especially spychologically involved which needed to be handled in a certain manner and it would definitely not be surprising if there was perhaps some error in judgment involved (no one is perfect). Generally though, I don't think it's in itself a bad thing for someone who may have had such surgery, but now repents of it to live according to the rule of an association of the faithful.

Well said.
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