a catholic "megachurch" (or what happens you merge 6 parishes)
#1
let it be for the record my parish is about 100 souls and we get along keeping fine money wise keeping the building together... maybe if these dioceses would do away with entire paid staffs at every parish and stupid "social" programs (my archdiocese runs a tv station which along with EWTN is only on cable, which just shows 90% EWTN content.. and EWTN is 2 channels away.. yeah wise spending there) they wouldnt run out of money and close down churches with so much family history and emotion attached to them then build these 10 million dollars replacements bwwswaaaa  :mad:
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[Image: behind_the_design1.jpg]

Future of the Church in America?

That is exactly what this striking facility seems to represent. An article in Church Executive Magazine outlines how the building came to be, from the merger of six parishes in Wisconsin. Could this be the shape of things to come?

Take a look:

    Holy Family Catholic Community in Fond du Lac, WI, has the remarkable distinction of being a house of worship that was created by the merger of six other Catholic parishes. This merger was decided in 1998 and the parishes became one church in 2007. Bringing together several parishes brought on the need to include a large fellowship hall, worship space and offices. The 53,000-square-foot church is designed to accommodate 1,250 people.

    “The church’s leadership desired an image of unity that would embrace the six parishes,” says John Holz, project designer, Plunkett Raysich Architects. “The design is expressed architecturally in the wood and steel structure where six beams, representing the merged churches, span from the baptistery to the altar.” The beams from front to back of the space are made out of steel columns that are inlaid with wood and then the wood is used to span the columns, which creates the effect of arches.

    The church faces the Niagara Escarpment, a 650-mile geological formation with enpoints in Wisconsin and New York. Local quarried stone from the escarpment (cliff formation) is used to form the base of the church and the bell tower.

    The stone is also used to form six octagonal pavilions that symbolize the former churches. Three of the rooms serve as a memorial to the churches of St. Joseph, St. Louis and St. Patrick filled with artifacts and artwork. The baptistery is the tallest of the octagonal spaces and is the entry into the church. These octagons link the colonnades of the church.

    The design team incorporated elements from the six churches. “One of the biggest challenges was creating a new church that all six congregations would embrace,” Holz says. “Not all of the parishes came to this process with open arms. In doing this new church we certainly had to acknowledge the sadness of the congregants that were not ready to let go of their worship homes.”

    The design incorporates elements from the six churches to further emphasize that Holy Family is one church of many. “We reused stained glass and the pipe organ from the downtown St. Joseph parish,” Holz says. “This is to let people know that the church is truly a blend of the parishes and honors their memory. This is not done in a kitschy museum-style; these elements were thoughtfully integrated into the design.”

    The design material that stands out is the wood. “Wood is very important in this church. It is a humble workable material that is warm and tactile,” says Holz. “The giant wood beams are welcoming and are a nice complement to the stone, metal and glass.” The elements combine to form a functional and aesthetic volume.

    The lighting concept used in the church includes clerestory windows and a high gable glass. “We definitely wanted the light to enter from the top of the space. The light filters down and has an ethereal effect,” Holz says.

    There is a colonnaded area between the church’s courtyard and fellowship hall. This includes an east facing glass wall that opens to a view of a rolling hill. “We wanted to let the movement of the sun across the site inform part of the design,” Holz says. “There is a distinct architectural vernacular; however, it is neither an old-fashioned or modern aesthetic.

    Because of the uniqueness of the of the church merger, the design team had to create a church that would not only be timeless, but also embrace the different parish communities and ethnic groups represented in Fond du Lac. According to Holz, there are about 45,000 residents in Fond du Lac, and about one-third of them are Catholic — a very high percentage.

    “The church is a good neighbor to its residential community,” Holz says. “The materials and familiar forms are respectful to the design aesthetic of the neighborhood.” While the size of the church is a very big statement on the landscape, the landmark structure uses materials that suggest permanence. “It is truly a call to worship for the entire city of Fond Du Lac,” Holz says.
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#2
They seem to confuse "church" with "parish".

The Catholic Church is One.
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#3
I guess I don't understand the issue here. The size? The fact it doesn't "look" like an old Church? If the consecration of the Host is valid and we are receiving the Body and Blood of Our Lord while in the state of grace then what is the issue?? If they have 1200 people and must accommodate them all then I guess this is the solution.

I agree it is hard when small Parishes are closing down, but I am not sure what the negative part is about this post. I am known for speed reading, many times detrimental to me, and this could be one of them. If I missed something in your post let me know.
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#4
(01-01-2011, 09:36 PM)adam2626 Wrote: I guess I don't understand the issue here. The size? The fact it doesn't "look" like an old Church? If the consecration of the Host is valid and we are receiving the Body and Blood of Our Lord while in the state of grace then what is the issue?? If they have 1200 people and must accommodate them all then I guess this is the solution.

I agree it is hard when small Parishes are closing down, but I am not sure what the negative part is about this post. I am known for speed reading, many times detrimental to me, and this could be one of them. If I missed something in your post let me know.

The issue: six parishes were merged into one building, which is very large.

The other issue, which is not in the article, is the management of money for what matters, and the bleeding of people from parishes which causes them to have not enough people to pay their bills.
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#5
This looks like a wonderful way for protestants to worship each other.
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#6
Y'know, I get kinda sad at when I see these parishes, and then think about the family history here.

But then I realize that the prior generations (parents of the Boomers, the Boomers) failed to transmit the Faith, and they are eating their just desserts because of it.

Then I stop being sad for those people, and think of the lost art we have. 
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#7
I remember how many American Catholics were immigrant children working in mills and on farms and that usually the priest was often the only educated individual in their lives; then I realize that most American Catholics throughout the 20th century simply did not have the time, education, or financial resources to acquire a spiffy Catholic education enough to be aware of the problems that the Church of the 20th century had.

My social history education didn't make me any money, but it gave me the necessary lenses to consider things people often forget.
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#8
(01-02-2011, 02:06 AM)verenaerin Wrote:
(01-02-2011, 01:59 AM)dark lancer Wrote: I remember how many American Catholics were immigrant children working in mills and on farms and that usually the priest was often the only educated individual in their lives; then I realize that most American Catholics throughout the 20th century simply did not have the time, education, or financial resources to acquire a spiffy Catholic education enough to be aware of the problems that the Church of the 20th century had.

My social history education didn't make me any money, but it gave me the necessary lenses to consider things people often forget.


Don't forget my Molly Maguires up the road who paid for all the churches slaving away in coal mines. They had those on the website as well.

The cathedral in my town and diocese had its foundation dug in one weekend by Irish immigrant laborers who volunteered their time and brought their own tools.

My point is not what was invested in the construction of such churches, but rather that many Catholics were more unprepared to resist the tide of Vatican II than many present-day trads would have you believe.
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#9
(01-02-2011, 01:59 AM)dark lancer Wrote: I remember how many American Catholics were immigrant children working in mills and on farms and that usually the priest was often the only educated individual in their lives; then I realize that most American Catholics throughout the 20th century simply did not have the time, education, or financial resources to acquire a spiffy Catholic education enough to be aware of the problems that the Church of the 20th century had.

My social history education didn't make me any money, but it gave me the necessary lenses to consider things people often forget.

Uneducated people for centuries transmitted the Faith.  The home is the domestic Church.

The social atmosphere in terms of ability to transfer the Faith was not unique to America.  Heck, look at Europe - they've done a far worse job, too! 

And, I think most American Catholics could and did send their children to spiffy Catholic schools, because they all put their time and money in, and parish schools were (and, mostly, still are) financed by the parish, with very low tuitions.
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#10
I extremely dislike the fact that they call it a 'Catholic Community', has America become so decadent and secular it rejects the word Church?
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