Smoking a sin?
#11
I smoke a pipe on average about once a month. I suppose that would be a mortal sin too?

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#12
I really doubt a trad priest said smoking was any more than a venial sin if one at all.  I'm willing to bet this was a Novus Ordo priest, and one who might say auto racing is a mortal sin as well.

It could be a trad priest, but I'd be really surprised.
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#13
Traditionally it has not been considered a sin unfortunately since VII the church has
been unduly influenced by political correctness and there are some within it who will
tell you it is a sin. Chesterton fought against the prohibitionists and so will I:

"The free man owns himself. He can damage himself with either eating or drinking; he can ruin himself with gambling. If he does he is certainly a damn fool, and he might possibly be a damned soul; but if he may not, he is not a free man any more than a dog."

- G.K. Chesterton

http://fisheaters.com/onamericanmorals.html

Smoking is harmful to your health, but even so I do not think it is suicide anymore than indulging in fried chicken is. It is
at most a venial sin no smoker I know of intends to commit suicide smoking, but admittedly it is dangerous, it probably
will reduce your life span however the dangers of smoking are somewhat exaggerated by the media, you
are not guaranteed to get lung cancer if you smoke however there is (statistically) a much greater chance that you will. Similarly
spending a great deal of your life commuting in a car is highly dangerous statistically you are much safer if you never drive all
other things being equal, as with almost as things in life there is a trade off it is the same with smoking you accept
the pleasure(pleasure is not bad it is good) and in exchange you must take a calculated risk.
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#14
(01-05-2011, 01:47 AM)sheep101 Wrote: ...no smoker I know of intends to commit suicide smoking...

I believe Kurt Vonnegut was once quoted as saying he smoked because it was a socially acceptable form of suicide. Ironically, he was a heavy smoker all his life, and lived to the ripe old age of 84. He died from injuries after falling down the stairs.
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#15
Traditionally, the Church almost banned it, along with other governments, because the dangers and foolishness of it were known.

Pope Urban VII even considered excommunication for certain transgressions.

I know it is popular to follow the modern idea of smoking as "civilised", but it was a habit started by non-Christians who used it for hallucinogenic and religious purposes and it was transported back to Europe.

It is not civilised to take plants, burn them, and then inhale the fumes, no matter how ingrained it is in the culture.

One could blame VII and secular influence, or one could look at the facts.

Since it is subject to great cultural influence, individual judgement is often mitigated because of various factors, but this is no reason to surrender to it.

The morality of it is separate from government regulation. Whether it is a sin or not is separate from government regulations.
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#16
[Image: Pius+IX+Tobacco+Factory.JPG]

Pope Pius IX's tobacco factory in the Trastavere neighborhood of Rome.  This was the seat of the papal tobacco monopoly.
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#17
It's odd because I know a handful of Traditional priests who smoke. I always figured smoking was, to most people, a means of relaxation and not so much for social acceptance.

I don't see how a person who smokes automatically is suicidal and out to kill themselves. If you figure that by smoking you are somehow being careless with life, I don't see how it is any different than a person who risks their life everyday by getting in a car and getting out on the road.
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#18
(01-05-2011, 09:48 PM)PsychoMonkey Wrote: It's odd because I know a handful of Traditional priests who smoke. I always figured smoking was, to most people, a means of relaxation and not so much for social acceptance.

I don't see how a person who smokes automatically is suicidal and out to kill themselves. If you figure that by smoking you are somehow being careless with life, I don't see how it is any different than a person who risks their life everyday by getting in a car and getting out on the road.

Or the person who seals themselves in a room with a running car...
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#19
Rosarium Wrote:Or the person who seals themselves in a room with a running car...

I'm guessing if the person were purposefully trying to kill themselves then, yes. If you smoke to excess in hopes of killing yourself then it would absolutely be a mortal sin. People who enjoy wine could be accused of killing themselves because they are slowly pickling their livers. People who fly could be putting themselves in an unneeded risk. Same for people who get out on the road and drive. People who eat from glass bowls could be putting themselves in an unneeded risk as the bowl could chip and they could swallow glass and die.

Where does it end?
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#20
(01-04-2011, 08:50 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: Was this a traditional priest?

It was at an indult parish, but I do not know to what extent his beliefs are concerning pre-Vatican II law, etc.
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