Smoking a sin?
#51
(04-04-2011, 06:49 PM)The Curt Jester Wrote:
(04-04-2011, 04:22 PM)Andrew Wrote: I think there are two primary negative health effects of smoking.  First is the effect it has on your mood.  Like anything else that stimulates you, it is always followed by a crash.  So, regular smoking makes the "peaks" higher and the "valleys" lower.  Second, it makes you significantly more prone to sinus and chest congestion and, as a result, sinus and chest infections, which, eventually can progress into chronic bronchitis and of course, pnuemonia, as well as what they call ephysema (where the lungs are damaged).  Naturally, those things wouldn't be much of an issue, until you were older, but it still takes its regular toll, while you are younger.  Of course, long term consumption of spicy food and carbonated beverages, generally leads to stomach problems (I'm sure we've all seen the commercials for drugs like Prilosex, being marketed to middle aged people).  Regular consumption of sugar, causes a similar kind of effect in mood and can lead to diabetes and high blood pressure.  High blood pressure is usually controlled by not eating sugar or flour and eating at least six servings of whole grain a day.  Regular consumption of saturated fats, raises cholesterol and, hence, can lead to heart disease.  Caffeine is going to have the same kind of effect on mood (higher peaks and lower valleys) as well as stomach trouble.  You just can't win!   :laughing:

So, there are real consquences to what we put in our mouths.  On the other hand, Jesus turned the water into wine, ate bread (not wheat berries) and meat, not egg whites.  I think the real moral issue, in regards to this stuff, is how our culture has put Profit (love of money), above everything else. 


 

Well, I think another thing about it that has to be taken into account is that smoking can affect the health of those around the smoker.  It doesn't just affect the one person.

I think they've taken that too far. 

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#52
(01-04-2011, 05:37 AM)Madeformv Wrote: I went to confession and I asked the priest whether smoking cigarettes was a sin and he said it was a mortal sin, referencing to "Thou shalt not kill" and said "that includes yourself, if you know smoking is harmful and causes death and you know suicide is a grave sin, then you should know that cigarette smoking is a sin." What do you think?

The line is that's been around since the early post-conciliar era, still true for the old liberal monsignors hanging on in many chaneries, I suppose:

the two great sins of the new church are smoking and assisting at the traditional Mass. What kind of penance did you receive? Using cloth bags at the supermarket is one of my favorites.
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#53
An article on the health benefits of smoking, with links to the peer reviewed scientific journals in which the studies were published:

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article...html?cat=5
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#54
The only person in my family who ever contracted lung cancer was the only one who didn't smoke. Maybe it's a sin for me not to smoke?
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#55
I'm not sure. I would say, however, that it is not a sin, per se.
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#56
(04-06-2011, 11:32 AM)Longinus Wrote:
(01-04-2011, 05:37 AM)Madeformv Wrote: I went to confession and I asked the priest whether smoking cigarettes was a sin and he said it was a mortal sin, referencing to "Thou shalt not kill" and said "that includes yourself, if you know smoking is harmful and causes death and you know suicide is a grave sin, then you should know that cigarette smoking is a sin." What do you think?

The line is that's been around since the early post-conciliar era, still true for the old liberal monsignors hanging on in many chaneries, I suppose:

the two great sins of the new church are smoking and assisting at the traditional Mass. What kind of penance did you receive? Using cloth bags at the supermarket is one of my favorites.

That's funny!  So, how about buying an S.U.V?  (mortal or venial?)  lol

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#57
(04-06-2011, 04:56 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: An article on the health benefits of smoking, with links to the peer reviewed scientific journals in which the studies were published:

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article...html?cat=5

That surprises me. I thought there were no benefits to smoking cigarettes.
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#58
(04-08-2011, 07:10 PM)Genius Wrote:
(04-06-2011, 04:56 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: An article on the health benefits of smoking, with links to the peer reviewed scientific journals in which the studies were published:

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article...html?cat=5

That surprises me. I thought there were no benefits to smoking cigarettes.

And that's exactly what the antismoking zealots want you to believe! The tobacco companies can't tell you. The USDA and Health Canada would have them by the short hairs if they tried and the antis will never mention it. :)
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#59
Those "benefits" are marginal.

What about people acting differently because they "need" a cigarette? What about all those fires caused by smokers?

Quote:According to an article published in 1995 in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, schizophrenics have much higher smoking rates than people with other mental illnesses, and appear to use it as a method of self-medicating. The article postulates that nicotine found in cigarettes reduces psychiatric, cognitive, sensory, and physical effects of schizophrenia, and also provides relief of common side effects from antipsychotic drugs.
So, the fact that people with severe mental illnesses smoke more than others is a sign that smoking is good for mental disorders?

So, that means that sex is good for people with STDs!

My grandmother was a smoker and had severe health problems which are supposedly lower in smokers mentioned in that article.

Quote:Perhaps most shockingly, tobacco smoke's anti-inflammatory effects may actually provide some benefits to children who are exposed to secondhand smoke. While this is certainly not worth at-home experimentation, one astonishing study conducted in Sweden observed two generations of Swedish children and found that the children of smokers had lower rates of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, atopic eczema, and food allergies. The studied groups included 6909 adults and 4472 children, and the findings remained consistent, even when adjusted to reflect other variables.
So, inducing a reaction to harmful substances to cause resistance to them is good even if it involves unnecessary drugs?

Quote:Other surprising academic findings reveal that tobacco may have a positive effect on pregnancy, although this, too, should not be left up to individual experimentation. A study published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology revealed that preeclampsia, an extremely common but potentially deadly condition, is significantly less common in expectant mothers who smoke cigarettes than in expectant mothers who do not smoke.
Is this the only difference? Never mind that smoking results in much higher infertility rates in women, damages the ovaries, and increases the risk of miscarrying by a high percentage.

Maybe that is why preeclampsia rates are lower because fertility and duration of pregnancy is lower!

http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/To.../index.htm

Cyanide reduces certain health problems too. In fact, most "bad" things do have some "positive" effect. That is what drugs are. Usually, using them is carefully monitored to get a certain effect. Why? Because drugs by nature are harmful!

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#60
(04-11-2011, 04:29 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(04-08-2011, 07:10 PM)Genius Wrote:
(04-06-2011, 04:56 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: An article on the health benefits of smoking, with links to the peer reviewed scientific journals in which the studies were published:

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article...html?cat=5

That surprises me. I thought there were no benefits to smoking cigarettes.

And that's exactly what the antismoking zealots want you to believe! The tobacco companies can't tell you. The USDA and Health Canada would have them by the short hairs if they tried and the antis will never mention it. :)

I think I am going to take up smoking.
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