Smoking a sin?
#61
(04-05-2011, 01:06 PM)Andrew Wrote:
(04-04-2011, 06:49 PM)The Curt Jester Wrote:
(04-04-2011, 04:22 PM)Andrew Wrote: I think there are two primary negative health effects of smoking.  First is the effect it has on your mood.  Like anything else that stimulates you, it is always followed by a crash.  So, regular smoking makes the "peaks" higher and the "valleys" lower.  Second, it makes you significantly more prone to sinus and chest congestion and, as a result, sinus and chest infections, which, eventually can progress into chronic bronchitis and of course, pnuemonia, as well as what they call ephysema (where the lungs are damaged).  Naturally, those things wouldn't be much of an issue, until you were older, but it still takes its regular toll, while you are younger.  Of course, long term consumption of spicy food and carbonated beverages, generally leads to stomach problems (I'm sure we've all seen the commercials for drugs like Prilosex, being marketed to middle aged people).  Regular consumption of sugar, causes a similar kind of effect in mood and can lead to diabetes and high blood pressure.  High blood pressure is usually controlled by not eating sugar or flour and eating at least six servings of whole grain a day.  Regular consumption of saturated fats, raises cholesterol and, hence, can lead to heart disease.  Caffeine is going to have the same kind of effect on mood (higher peaks and lower valleys) as well as stomach trouble.  You just can't win!   LOL

So, there are real consquences to what we put in our mouths.  On the other hand, Jesus turned the water into wine, ate bread (not wheat berries) and meat, not egg whites.  I think the real moral issue, in regards to this stuff, is how our culture has put Profit (love of money), above everything else. 


 

Well, I think another thing about it that has to be taken into account is that smoking can affect the health of those around the smoker.  It doesn't just affect the one person.

I think they've taken that too far. 

Perhaps.  However, as someone who IS affected negatively by other people smoking, I have to agree with those who claim that it affects other people -- because I can say it does from personal experience.
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#62
(04-05-2011, 01:06 PM)Andrew Wrote:
(04-04-2011, 06:49 PM)The Curt Jester Wrote:
(04-04-2011, 04:22 PM)Andrew Wrote: I think there are two primary negative health effects of smoking.  First is the effect it has on your mood.  Like anything else that stimulates you, it is always followed by a crash.  So, regular smoking makes the "peaks" higher and the "valleys" lower.  Second, it makes you significantly more prone to sinus and chest congestion and, as a result, sinus and chest infections, which, eventually can progress into chronic bronchitis and of course, pnuemonia, as well as what they call ephysema (where the lungs are damaged).  Naturally, those things wouldn't be much of an issue, until you were older, but it still takes its regular toll, while you are younger.  Of course, long term consumption of spicy food and carbonated beverages, generally leads to stomach problems (I'm sure we've all seen the commercials for drugs like Prilosex, being marketed to middle aged people).  Regular consumption of sugar, causes a similar kind of effect in mood and can lead to diabetes and high blood pressure.  High blood pressure is usually controlled by not eating sugar or flour and eating at least six servings of whole grain a day.  Regular consumption of saturated fats, raises cholesterol and, hence, can lead to heart disease.  Caffeine is going to have the same kind of effect on mood (higher peaks and lower valleys) as well as stomach trouble.  You just can't win!   LOL

So, there are real consquences to what we put in our mouths.  On the other hand, Jesus turned the water into wine, ate bread (not wheat berries) and meat, not egg whites.  I think the real moral issue, in regards to this stuff, is how our culture has put Profit (love of money), above everything else. 


 

Well, I think another thing about it that has to be taken into account is that smoking can affect the health of those around the smoker.  It doesn't just affect the one person.

[size=10pt]I think they've taken that too far.  [/size]

So do I.  That kind of stuff stinks of false justification for the persistent encroachment of governing authorities to run just about everything in our lives. 

On the other hand, I think CJester is right: it is rude. 
I'm reminded of a Steve Martin skit from the 70's, where he's in dialogue with some pretend character. 
The person casually and somewhat presumptuously asks Steve "Do you mind if I smoke?",
to which Steve casually and presumptuously responds "No, do you mind if I fart"? 
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#63
I think that sums it up!   Way to go!
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