Black Nazarene in Manila Draws 1.7 Million Devotees
#1
Black Nazarene draws 1.7M

By CHRISTINA I. HERMOSO and LEONARD D. POSTRADO
January 9, 2011, 5:57pm

MANILA, Philippines – Braving a chilly morning drizzle, over a million devotees joined the festivities and grand procession of the revered Black Nazarene in Manila Sunday, the Manila Police District (MPD) reported.

Superintendent Remigio Sedanto, chief of the MPD Operations Division which is in charge of crowd control, said 1.3-million people were at the overnight vigil and attended the morning’s Mass at Quirino Grandstand while 500,000 other devotees who made their way barefoot to Quiapo Church from various parts of the metropolis.

Sedanto gave the crowd estimate at 2 p.m. and said that a number of untoward incidents arising from a restless crowd led to the injury or fainting of over 400 people.

Gwen Pang of the Philippine National Red Cross, which had nine medical emergency stations and 14 standby ambulances, said that as of 2 p.m. Sunday, 453 people had been attended to, mostly for fainting and slight injuries.

Nine people were taken to the Ospital ng Maynila (OsMa) and one to the Gat Andres Bonifiacio Hospital.

After staying the night at the Quirino Grandstand in Rizal Park, some 800,000 devotees who attended the Mass joined the traditional grand procession that brought back 404-year-old image of Christ – many believe to be miraculous – from Luneta to the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church or St. John the Baptist Parish) early Sunday morning.

The long procession began at about 7:30 a.m., shortly after the 6 a.m. mass celebrated by Manila Archbishop Gaudencio B. Cardinal Rosales at the Quirino Grandstand, where the image was taken Saturday for an overnight vigil and a series of activities.

While chanting “Viva Senor!” a sea of barefoot devotees, majority of whom were clad in maroon shirts, which is associated with the image, tried to touch the ropes attached to the gilded carroza (carriage) of the Black Nazarene. Devotees believe the ropes have miraculous and healing powers. As has been the practice the past years, female devotees in front of the procession were allowed to help pull the ropes. Those who could not get near waved their white handkerchiefs or hurled their towels to the marshals guarding the Black Nazarene, and which in turn were thrown back to the crowd after wiping them on the miraculous image of the Poong Nazareno.

Many followed the procession singing the “Ama Namin” (Our Father), while carrying replicas of the Back Nazarene and crucifixes. At the Plaza Miranda, tens of thousands of devotees waited for the arrival of the Black Nazarene. Large crowds also attended the masses at the Quiapo Church held by the hour from 3 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 9 p.m.

As of early Sunday afternoon, the organizers said, the grand procession was moving at a faster pace this year and was estimated to make it back to the church between 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., in time for the last mass scheduled at 9 p.m. The Black Nazarene procession ended at around 9 p.m. in 2009 and at past 10 p.m. last year.

Be ready to make sacrifices Cardinal Rosales, in his homily during the early morning mass at the Quirino Grandstand, called on the Catholic faithful “to be ready to make sacrifices.” He said, “Ang pagbabago ay bunga ng pagmamalasakit. Kung ang isang tao ay hindi handing magmalasakit, hindi matutuloy ang pagbabago. Ito ang nakikita natin sa larawan ni Hesus Nazareno.” (Renewal is a result of sacrifice, If a person is not ready to make sacrifices, change will not come about. This is what we see in the image of the Black Nazarene).

He urged the faithful “to pray for God’s blessings, to help each Filipino and to pray for every family, their parish, and the nation” as well as to follow the example of the Black Nazarene particularly in terms of simplicity and loyalty to one’s friends, as Jesus was to His disciples.

Meanwhile, over 100,000 Black Nazarene devotees joined the 53rd annual procession of a replica of the miraculous image Sunday at 3 p.m. in Cagayan de Oro, where a vigil was held at the Jesus of Nazareth Parish Church in the town of Lapasan.

Msgr. Rey Manuel Monsanto, parish priest said, devotees of the Black Nazarene in Cagayan de Oro have grown in number over the years, especially after the image of the Black Nazarene was brought to Mindanao in 2009.

Unknown to many, the black wooden cross of the centuries-old Black Nazareneimage from Mexico has a spring which allows it to bend. Msgr. Clemente Ignacio, rector of the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church), said the cross has a spring for it to be able to easily enter areas with low arches during a procession. “That was a spring because when the cross enters under the bridge of Quinta(Quiapo) Market we bend it for it to pass through,” he told reporters.

Former vicar- general of Quiapo Church Fr. Alvin Fullon, for his part, narrated the time when the Nazarene’s cross was damaged. “It got stuck because the arch of the bridge was low, so we decided to make it flexible to prevent a similar incident,” he said.

Some devotees got worried Sunday when a portion of the cross of the centuries- old image bent backwards, while the group Hijos del Nazareno (Sons of the Lord Nazarene) was preparing the Nazareno for the procession. Aside from the cross, the original body of the Nazareno, together with the replica of the head, was carried Sunday from Luneta all the way to Quiapo Church.

Ignacio, meantime, called on the faithful not to focus so much on touching the image because Christ is always present in the Eucharist. “The procession is just an outflow of the Eucharist... Christ is really in the Eucharist,” he said. The church official said people can also show devotion to Christ by following His teachings. “The right devotion is embracing Christ’s teachings and allowing Him to enter our life it is only then that we become true disciples of Christ,” said Ignacio.
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#2
Interesting.  I swear, the Philippines have some nifty traditions.  I just got done reading the story about the "Black Santo Nino of Cebu."

http://books.google.com.ph/books?id=VPj2HIYXjYgC&pg=PA226&lpg=PA226&dq=%22santo+nino%22+%22miracles%22+%22cebu%22&source=bl&ots=5wDdGZ3GoJ&sig=FK25nz643oIeP75rRMdIDHKruzc&hl=en&ei=4aEpTZ75MsO4rAeZw7z4DA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBYQ6AEwADgU#v=onepage&q=%22santo%20nino%22%20%22miracles%22%20%22cebu%22&f=false

Is this black Santo Nino in existence anywhere? 

Also, do you, Hawaii, or anyone else on Fisheaters--does anyone know a website that lists the different miracles attributed to the Santo Nino of Cebu that Magellan brought here over half a millenia ago?  I have tried looking it up on the internet, but I only get the generic reference of how the Santo Nino is attributed to "many miracles."  So...what specifically?

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#3
Some notes:

The procession just ended 15mins ago after a grueling 17hrs on the road. The route, all of 5km, was heavily inundated with devotees numbering in what seemed like millions at all times.

A later estimate from Manila police ( around 5pm) pegged the number of people who accompanied the procession itself at around 3 million at least. Also heard on the tv that the crowd near the vicinity of Quiapo church ( where the Nazareno is enthroned) swelled up to 1 to 1.5 million. Police expected a total of 6 million devotees to troop to Quiapo for the 404th commemoration of the 'traslacion' ( when the image was moved to Quiapo several centuries ago); meanwhile, 200,000 joined the procession of the replica of the Nazarene in Cagayan de Oro in Mindanao.

Walking on one's knees and barefoot is a gesture heavily associated with the devotion to the Nuestro Padre Jesus Nazareno; majority of the devotees did so for the entire duration of the procession.

On a personal note I consider the Nazarene to e instrumental in my being accepted into my university of choice. I remember passing by Quiapo church 5yrs ago and saying a quick prayer halfheartedly that I may enter a good school. I didn't really believe it then, but exactly 2 days later, on the day of the feast itself, I received my letters of acceptance from my top two choices. A small
Miracle to be sure, but I've never doubted it since then. The Nazarene has also effected numerous conversions and healings. One story that was repeatedly aired on tv was how it was instrumental in the healing and eventual conversion of an American baptist and even his nephew in the States. But the miracles attributed to the Nazarene are simply too many to enumerate.
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#4
(01-09-2011, 12:47 PM)Matamoros Wrote: Some notes:

The procession just ended 15mins ago after a grueling 17hrs on the road. The route, all of 5km, was heavily inundated with devotees numbering in what seemed like millions at all times.

A later estimate from Manila police ( around 5pm) pegged the number of people who accompanied the procession itself at around 3 million at least. Also heard on the tv that the crowd near the vicinity of Quiapo church ( where the Nazareno is enthroned) swelled up to 1 to 1.5 million. Police expected a total of 6 million devotees to troop to Quiapo for the 404th commemoration of the 'traslacion' ( when the image was moved to Quiapo several centuries ago); meanwhile, 200,000 joined the procession of the replica of the Nazarene in Cagayan de Oro in Mindanao.

Walking on one's knees and barefoot is a gesture heavily associated with the devotion to the Nuestro Padre Jesus Nazareno; majority of the devotees did so for the entire duration of the procession.

On a personal note I consider the Nazarene to e instrumental in my being accepted into my university of choice. I remember passing by Quiapo church 5yrs ago and saying a quick prayer halfheartedly that I may enter a good school. I didn't really believe it then, but exactly 2 days later, on the day of the feast itself, I received my letters of acceptance from my top two choices. A small
Miracle to be sure, but I've never doubted it since then. The Nazarene has also effected numerous conversions and healings. One story that was repeatedly aired on tv was how it was instrumental in the healing and eventual conversion of an American baptist and even his nephew in the States. But the miracles attributed to the Nazarene are simply too many to enumerate.


Wow, does the Philippines have many representations of the Infant Jesus?

I posted this up on another thread, seemed more of a "hello/goodbye" topic.  Here's the link.  Maybe I'll paste it here too, later. 

http://catholicforum.fisheaters.com/inde...496.0.html
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#5
Hi Laramie,

There literally dozens of 'avatars' of the Santo Nino in the Philippines. Manila alone has two dating back hundreds of years (Nino de Tondo and Pandacan) but the most popular, by far, is the Nino de Cebu, the oldest venerated icon in the country. I don't know how the Cebu Nino came to be black ( some say it was the result of a fire some say it was painted over some decades ago) but the Nino today is back to being 'kayumanggi.'  In Batangas there is said to be a replica of the Santo
Nino de Cebu which is still dark colored although there it is known as the Santo Nino de Batangan. In Spanish times too the Nino was declared capitan general de Filipinas which resulted in the rather quaint depiction of the Nino wearing a military uniform, complete with the big hat ( name escapes me atm). My face Nino though is the Nino Guerrero ( the Child depicted riding a chariot) although I suspect this devotion never really left the confines of the elite. I'll try to post a more comprehensive reply tomorrow, but in the meantime i must hie off to bed now.
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#6
That is a serious number of people.  More people than have ever turned out for JP2 I think.  What was his record?

Lucky they are not Muslims.  Someone would have got crushed in a stampede.
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#7
Just about every Filipino Catholic home, wherever they are (save for workers in Muslim countries like Saudi Arabia of course) will have a form of the Santo Nino on a home altar.
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#8
(01-09-2011, 01:09 PM)Matamoros Wrote: Hi Laramie,

There literally dozens of 'avatars' of the Santo Nino in the Philippines. Manila alone has two dating back hundreds of years (Nino de Tondo and Pandacan) but the most popular, by far, is the Nino de Cebu, the oldest venerated icon in the country. I don't know how the Cebu Nino came to be black ( some say it was the result of a fire some say it was painted over some decades ago) but the Nino today is back to being 'kayumanggi.'   In Batangas there is said to be a replica of the Santo
Nino de Cebu which is still dark colored although there it is known as the Santo Nino de Batangan. In Spanish times too the Nino was declared capitan general de Filipinas which resulted in the rather quaint depiction of the Nino wearing a military uniform, complete with the big hat ( name escapes me atm). My face Nino though is the Nino Guerrero ( the Child depicted riding a chariot) although I suspect this devotion never really left the confines of the elite. I'll try to post a more comprehensive reply tomorrow, but in the meantime i must hie off to bed now.

Wow, thanks!  I did not know this!
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#9
Hmm looks like I was wrong after all. The total number of people who joined the celebrations apparently reached 7 million, per the Manila police. Assuming that number is accurate, it's a miracle no one died this year.
Quote:Metro Manila police chief Director Nicanor Bartolome, in an interview aired over dwIZ radio on Monday, said those at the Quirino Grandstand alone numbered more than one million.

He said the seven million attendees included the devotees who were at the starting point of the procession at the Quirino Grandstand, those who waited along the the route of the procession, and those who were at the Quiapo Church, all in Manila.

“Ang kalsada puno ng tao kaya ang aming estimate hanggang matapos dito sa loob ng simbahan umaabot ng seven million ang ating estimate (The streets were so packed, our estimate of those who joined the procession amounted to seven million)," he said.

Source.
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#10
There are numerous miracles attributed to the Image of the Holy Infant (Santo Niño) since the time Ferdinand Magelland brought It with him on his discovery of the Philippines.  He presented as a gift the statuette to the wife of the then King of Cebu (Rajah Humabon) who, with his wife and tribe, converted to the Catholic Faith. 

I will recount two miracles.  After it was decided sometime in the seventeenth century that the central government of the Philippines should be moved to Manila (from Cebu where it was first established), one of the items they decided to bring was the Santo Niño.  On arriving in Manila. it was discovered that the crate bearing the Statuette was empty.  It was later found out that the Santo Niño was back on Its throne at the Shrine in Cebu.  The same incident happened again on the second attempt to translate the Holy Child to be enshrined in Manila.  The crate was empty.  It was then decided that the Santo Niño was meant to stay in Cebu.   

This Statuette is the oldest relic in the Philippines (since 1565 enshriend in the Basilica Minore of Cebu -- elevated to this rank by Pope Paul VI when he went to Manila).
.   
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