Priests can't question kids about sexual sins in confession
#11
(01-16-2011, 07:52 AM)OCLittleFlower Wrote: Revixit -- Do you think they should be asked those questions if they are confessing things that are totally unrelated?  If a kid goes in and confesses to disrespecting his parents, should he be asked if he watches porn?  At the age of twelve?  Really?  Now, it's one thing if he says, "I have lustful thoughts."  Then I think it's fitting for the priest to ask if he has acted on them, or if he watches material that provokes this.  Because, honestly, kids develop at various rates.  You cannot assume based on age alone.  I mean, some fourteen year old boys barely aren't even five feet tall and can still sing soprano or alto in a children's choir.  Others are much more developed. 

Even as an adult, I would be ENRAGED if I confessed non-sexual sins and was asked about sexual sin.  It's so far out of left field at that point.

I can totally see it now:

"I cheated on a math test last week"
"Do you masturbate?"
"Sorry, what?"
"Do you masturbate?"
"No, I cheat.  Um, duh!"

Little Flower,
I don't understand why you would be enrtaged.
It is NORMAL that a priest asks anybody about impurity sins because he knows this is the kind of sin that embarasses us the more.
If he is the first to talk about such sins, this certainly much helps the penitent to acknowledge them more easily since one has only to reply by yes or no.
Don't forget that sometimes the priest is as embarassed as the people he confesses. Anyway, he himself is a man and he undergoes the same tentations as everyone.
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#12
(01-16-2011, 07:52 AM)OCLittleFlower Wrote: Revixit -- Do you think they should be asked those questions if they are confessing things that are totally unrelated? 

You are quite naive to think 12 and 13 year-olds are innocents.  Women tend to remain naive about how strong the sex drive is in boys and men.  Your hypothetical 14 year-old boy who's short and singing soprano would probably be masturbating regularly and downloading porn on his computer.  Are you even aware that some boys masturbate in groups, competitively?  


I agree with what Stevo said about the priest:

"Maybe he has the common sense to realise that if any sin is prevelant amongst young teenage boys, then masturbation and pornography are going to them, and on top of that, he may realise that most kids are going to be either to embarassed to confess it, or just don't consider it a big deal."


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#13
(01-16-2011, 01:43 PM)maso Wrote: Little Flower,
I don't understand why you would be enrtaged.
It is NORMAL that a priest asks anybody about impurity sins because he knows this is the kind of sin that embarasses us the more.
If he is the first to talk about such sins, this certainly much helps the penitent to acknowledge them more easily since one has only to reply by yes or no.
Don't forget that sometimes the priest is as embarassed as the people he confesses. Anyway, he himself is a man and he undergoes the same tentations as everyone.


Well said.  Confession would be easier if it were more like going to the doctor, with the priest asking questions like a doctor does.  "Have you taken the name of the Lord in vain?  Failed to attend Mass on a Sunday or Holy Day without just cause?  Told any lies?  Stolen anything?  Had impure thoughts?  Committed sins of impurity?" 

Once you've said "Yes" or "No" it would be easier to get into specifics, though the priest doesn't want all the details.  "How many times," and "did you do this alone or with someone else," are the things you are supposed to tell him about sins of impurity. 

Anybody who doesn't confess impure thoughts at every confession is probably not making a true confession.  The same is probably true of lying as well, even if you've only lied to avoid hurting someone's feelings or to stave off someone's anger.  We should try to find our way out of those situations without lying, though it's not easy.




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#14
Yes, impure thoughts, at least for men, are common sins almost every day even if one struggles against them at once (therefore not mortal sins) and it is probably impossible to get rid of them completely unless being a saint.
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#15
Did anyone notice that the priest heard 50 confessions in an hour and a half?  That's way less than 2 minutes per confession, given the time it takes to move around and go in and out of the confessional.  If he was asking questions about impurity, he obviously wasn't asking for details or trying to get juicy information for his own pleasure, as the article sickeningly suggests.  Perhaps a kid said something like "I looked at bad stuff on the internet" and so he asked if it was pornography.  Kids are shy about this kind of stuff but they do commit sins of impurity, especially with all that is available to them via the internet.

And what's with all the other crap about trouble with taxes, and the fact that he drank too much at one point  before driving.  What does that have to do with anything?  They're making this poor, holy priest out to be a pedophile.  Dear Lord, please help us!  :pray2:

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