Translation of blessing at the end of Mass
#11
Lovecraft certainly has his failings.  His dialogue is some of the worst ever written.  Where he excels is, IMO, painting a picture with words and the use of leaving things unsaid so the imagination provides the cause for fear and horror.

His book on supernatural horror in literature is an interesting read.

If I had to pick an all-around good writer, Poe was a much better write than Lovecraft, especially in dialogue, but his is a different kind of horror.  Lovecraft is more of "fantasy horror" where painting the picture is more critical.  Both are good at atmosphere, I think.
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#12
(01-17-2011, 08:19 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: Lovecraft certainly has his failings.  His dialogue is some of the worst ever written.  Where he excels is, IMO, painting a picture with words and the use of leaving things unsaid so the imagination provides the cause for fear and horror.

His book on supernatural horror in literature is an interesting read.

If I had to pick an all-around good writer, Poe was a much better write than Lovecraft, especially in dialogue, but his is a different kind of horror.  Lovecraft is more of "fantasy horror" where painting the picture is more critical.  Both are good at atmosphere, I think.

You know, I don't really recall much about Lovecraft's dialogue in the stories I read. They usually focus on the perception of people, rather than interactions with others. "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" has some dialogue I remember. Zadok's speech was well done I think.

I like how his stories do not involve rubber forehead aliens. It is built on the idea that the unknown is more than we can imagine and it focused on the perception of humans in situations which are beyond our words and understanding. So all we are left with is the horror and questions.

If Cthulhu and R'lyeh even though tangible, are still presented as being beyond our perception.

I like his focus on the human mind.
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