Inspired by classical pagans
#31
(02-16-2011, 10:49 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(02-04-2011, 11:37 AM)Pilgrim Wrote:
(02-03-2011, 08:44 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: Any recommended reading of dead Greek pagans to be done leisurely?  And, what of theirs to read?

I'd start with the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Aeneid.  Then, Plato's dialogues on the trial and death of Socrates.  Greek tragedies and comedies are also good (not to mention short).

The Aeneid (despite a Greek title) was written in Latin, by a Roman.

Yes, but it's a natural outgrowth of the Iliad and the Odyssey, so I included it with the Greek works.
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#32
(02-17-2011, 05:49 PM)Pilgrim Wrote:
(02-16-2011, 10:49 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(02-04-2011, 11:37 AM)Pilgrim Wrote:
(02-03-2011, 08:44 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: Any recommended reading of dead Greek pagans to be done leisurely?  And, what of theirs to read?

I'd start with the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Aeneid.  Then, Plato's dialogues on the trial and death of Socrates.  Greek tragedies and comedies are also good (not to mention short).

The Aeneid (despite a Greek title) was written in Latin, by a Roman.

Yes, but it's a natural outgrowth of the Iliad and the Odyssey, so I included it with the Greek works.

In that case, I recommend O Brother, Where Art Thou? :)
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#33
(02-17-2011, 06:30 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(02-17-2011, 05:49 PM)Pilgrim Wrote:
(02-16-2011, 10:49 PM)Rosarium Wrote: The Aeneid (despite a Greek title) was written in Latin, by a Roman.

Yes, but it's a natural outgrowth of the Iliad and the Odyssey, so I included it with the Greek works.

In that case, I recommend O Brother, Where Art Thou? :)

Touché...  ;D
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