Fake Milk
#11
(02-20-2011, 04:26 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote:
(02-20-2011, 04:18 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(02-20-2011, 04:06 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: I've always eaten my cereal cold and without milk.  :)
You are in college...you are supposed to do that. I bet you've eaten Ramen noodles dry as well.

Lol, no, but I've always done it, even as a kid.  ;)

In the Scouts, we often ate "oat meal", by opening a packet, eating a mouthful and then drinking some water (which was usually not warmed). It saved on cleaning.
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#12
I drink Almond "milk" pretty often and I like it.  It does not claim to be milk.  It calls itself "almond drink".  I like it better than rice "milk".  Another alternative is hemp "milk" which contains more protein than these others.  The soy "milk" is actually unhealthy, contrary to common belief, and should be avoided.  All unfermented soy products can mess up people's estrogen levels and should be avoided.
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#13
Baby Walburga can't have any cow's milk for a while, which means that Mrs. WRC can't have any either.

So Mrs. WRC has been trying soy milks.  I think it's gross, but she doesn't mind it in her cereal.  Different brands taste better or worse.  You might have to shop around a little to find what you like.
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#14
Oat milk is pretty good too.
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#15
(02-20-2011, 05:21 PM)JayneK Wrote: I drink Almond "milk" pretty often and I like it.  It does not claim to be milk.  It calls itself "almond drink".  I like it better than rice "milk".  Another alternative is hemp "milk" which contains more protein than these others.  The soy "milk" is actually unhealthy, contrary to common belief, and should be avoided.  All unfermented soy products can mess up people's estrogen levels and should be avoided.
Fermented soy?  What is the significance of fermentation in weather of not soy messes with your hormones?  I try to avoid things that contain soy, but don't really stress over it since it is so hard to completely avoid.  Can you explain this further?
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#16
Here is an article about soy and fermentation:
http://www.drlam.com/opinion/soyandestrogen.asp

Soy consists of complex chemical and structural components. The main components are protein, essential fatty acids, as well as a class of compounds known as isoflavones. Isoflavones as a family include compounds such as genistein, daidzein, equol, and glycitein. These are also called phytoestrogens in that they have properties that are estrogen like but are derived from plants. The amount of genistein per day consumed in the average Japanese is only 10mg. Mega consumption of isoflavones such as soy burgers can bring the total daily genistein intake to over 200mg. Genistein is particularly harmful for people who have preexisting low or marginally low thyroid function. It’s antagonism to the thyroid hormone is well established. A daily dose of genistein as low as 30mg can affect normal thyroid function.

The soy isoflavone genistein and daidzein are similar to 17 beta-estradiols, but are 100,000 times weaker in estrogenic activity and are therefore weak estrogens. Although these isoflavones are weak estrogens, people who eat a lot of it can have their blood level of isoflavones as mush as 10,000 times higher than those who do not consume soy. Over time, high concentrations of isoflavones in the body can have a significant cumulative estrogenic and toxic effect, especially when they are exposed to organs that have sensitive estrogen receptors sites such as the breast, uterus, and thyroid.
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#17
(02-20-2011, 04:14 PM)Rosarium Wrote: I came over to the computer to question the point of saying Almond milk contains Almonds specifically on the allergens part. Of course, I've seen "cranberry juice" which did not contain cranberries before.

My wife and foster daughter made the same comment a few weeks ago. Ahhh, the world we live in... :)
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#18
So how'd it go down, Ros? This is what I want to know?
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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#19

(02-20-2011, 04:14 PM)Rosarium Wrote: I came over to the computer to question the point of saying Almond milk contains Almonds specifically on the allergens part. Of course, I've seen "cranberry juice" which did not contain cranberries before.

My wife and foster daughter made the same comment a few weeks ago. Ahhh, the world we live in... :)
[/quote]

When we built our sun room about ten years ago, we were amused to discover that the windows were all labeled "CAUTION: Small children can fall out open windows if left unattended."

:doh:

They're trying to avoid law suits, of course, and it's true that small children can be victims of defenestration and equally true that some people are severely allergic to nuts.  But reading "contains almonds" on an almond milk carton is pretty funny, like reading that kids can fall out of windows.  My grandparents certainly would not understand the WARNING culture, I'm not sure my parents would have.

On the not at all funny side, I read about a college student who died of anaphylactic shock after eating chocolate chip cookies purchased from a machine in his dorm. He read the label and it said nothing about peanuts or peanut oil.

The thing was that the manufacturer also made cookies containing peanuts or peanut oils, using the same machines, and the cookies the student ate were slightly contaminated.  The machines were supposed to be cleaned properly between batches, but it takes only a tiny amount of nuts for some of those who are allergic to have a quick fatal reaction.

Because he hadn't had peanuts since he was a very small boy, it was thought that he would never have known what the taste was, if he had perceived any unusual taste at all.  That's why labels now say "May have been processed in machines which also processed x,y, and z."


I'm drinking Almond Silk right now, Pilgrim, for a pre-bedtime drink.  We get the unsweetened kind and sweeten it with Stevia.  I do wish I'd heated it tonight, it's kind of chilly in here and I'm drinking cold Silk. 
I think Silk makes the best soy milk, too, though I just use almond now.


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#20
The fat content of milk is the proportion of milk made up by butterfat. The fat content, particularly of cow's milk, is modified to make a variety of products. The fat content of milk is usually stated on the container, and the colour of the label or milk bottle top varied to enable quick recognition.
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