Fake Milk
#21
(02-20-2011, 07:36 PM)JayneK Wrote: Here is an article about soy and fermentation:
http://www.drlam.com/opinion/soyandestrogen.asp
Thanks!
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#22
Quote: Baby Walburga can't have any cow's milk for a while, which means that Mrs. WRC can't have any either.

So Mrs. WRC has been trying soy milks.  I think it's gross, but she doesn't mind it in her cereal.  Different brands taste better or worse.  You might have to shop around a little to find what you like.

Try goat's milk.  Babies that can't drink cow's milk can drink goat's milk.
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#23
(02-20-2011, 10:33 PM)Revixit Wrote: When we built our sun room about ten years ago, we were amused to discover that the windows were all labeled "CAUTION: Small children can fall out open windows if left unattended."

:doh:

They're trying to avoid law suits, of course, and it's true that small children can be victims of defenestration and equally true that some people are severely allergic to nuts.   But reading "contains almonds" on an almond milk carton is pretty funny, like reading that kids can fall out of windows.  My grandparents certainly would not understand the WARNING culture, I'm not sure my parents would have.
It does not cost anything to print something specifically on something which is already being fully printed.

I talked to my sister about this a few days ago.

Specifically, the butter heating tray on my hot air popper "may be hot", the cutting edge on the aluminum foil (and all such wraps) "Cutting edge is sharp" and the "might be flammable" matches and lighters.

I can see marking things which may not be obvious, but these small print warnings about things which are obvious are a laugh.

If I am in charge of something, I will be mocking them in all seriousness. "Water may be wet", "ball may be round", "air may be invisible"...
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#24
(02-20-2011, 09:09 PM)Jacafamala Wrote: So how'd it go down, Ros? This is what I want to know?

I am up and eating it again.

It is quite good. It does not taste like milk, which I like (it tastes like almonds and vanilla sweetened, which is what it is). And the ingredients on both the puffed rice and almond milk are minimal. Just the things which are actually part of the food, and added vitamins.
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#25
I love fake milks.  I detest the taste of cow's milk and always have.


I think soy milk is disgusting.  No matter the brand, it always has a slight chalkiness to it or coats your mouth in a strange aftertaste.  I prefer rice and almond milk.  Hemp milk is good for you but too expensive.

It's actually really easy to make your own faux milk and the taste is far superior to anything you buy in a tetra pak.

http://bonzaiaphrodite.com/2010/08/do-nu...-alt-milk/


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#26
You might try n get your hands on raw,unadulterated Milk  from a farmer that sells "cow shares". we do this.All adults are lactose intolerant to some degree or other.Some folk suffer worse than others but many modern problems are a result of the pasteurization and homogenization process store bought milk goes through.
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#27
(02-21-2011, 01:59 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote: You might try n get your hands on raw,unadulterated Milk  from a farmer that sells "cow shares". we do this.All adults are lactose intolerant to some degree or other.Some folk suffer worse than others but many modern problems are a result of the pasteurization and homogenization process store bought milk goes through.

Didn't people used to get sick from unpateurized milk?  Does anyone know why they started this process in the first place?
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#28
(02-21-2011, 03:41 PM)dymphna17 Wrote:
(02-21-2011, 01:59 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote: You might try n get your hands on raw,unadulterated Milk  from a farmer that sells "cow shares". we do this.All adults are lactose intolerant to some degree or other.Some folk suffer worse than others but many modern problems are a result of the pasteurization and homogenization process store bought milk goes through.

Didn't people used to get sick from unpateurized milk?  Does anyone know why they started this process in the first place?

No,peeps have been drinking raw milk since the dawn of time.

Modern milk is full of nasties such as puss cells and antibiotics due to the industrialized nature of production.
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#29
Asthma explained by common allergy to milk and dairy products


"The link between asthma and cows' milk is familiar to many young asthma sufferers and their parents. I first became aware of the connection through my cousin's experiences with his four-year-old son. Since infancy, my cousin's son has experienced severe asthma attacks and has been hospitalized twice for asthma-related pneumonia. When his asthma attacks become more frequent or more severe, my cousin and his wife respond by temporarily eliminating milk and milk products from his diet, and it usually works. I always assumed that milk worsened his asthma by stimulating mucus production in his lungs. However, studies suggest that, either along with or instead of creating excess mucus, milk may worsen asthma due to an undiagnosed milk allergy."



Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/010443.html#ixzz1EcogIigX
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#30
(02-21-2011, 03:41 PM)dymphna17 Wrote:
(02-21-2011, 01:59 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote: You might try n get your hands on raw,unadulterated Milk  from a farmer that sells "cow shares". we do this.All adults are lactose intolerant to some degree or other.Some folk suffer worse than others but many modern problems are a result of the pasteurization and homogenization process store bought milk goes through.

Didn't people used to get sick from unpateurized milk?  Does anyone know why they started this process in the first place?

One of our students nearly died as a result of drinking raw milk, which was from a certified (for safety) local source.  He was infected with Campylobacter and his infection was severe enough to cause him to be hospitalized for a week or more.   He was 20 and in perfect health before contracting campylobacteriosis.  

I don't know if it caused him long-term effects; CDC says "It is estimated that approximately one in every 1,000 reported Campylobacter illnesses leads to Guillain-Barré syndrome.As many as 40% of Guillain-Barré syndrome cases in this country may be triggered by campylobacteriosis."  Another long-term effect of campylobacteriosis is arthritis.  Death is obviously a very long-term effect, though it occurs soon after infection, when it occurs.  Most people recover but

The CDC says "Outbreaks of Campylobacter are usually associated with unpasteurized milk or contaminated water."

Those who choose to drink raw milk think it's safe to do so as long as you buy from a farmer whose herd is certified as safe.  But our student did that and was very, very sick.

There are other ways to get Campylobacter and I recommend that anyone concerned about preventing food-borne illness read the CDC's report, which is not too technical or too long but gives all necessary details.

http://www.cdc.gov/nczved/divisions/dfbm...r/#prevent




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