Church History
#1
Is anyone else here a complete church history nerd, like myself? I eat that stuff for breakfast.

Anyone says anything like 'edict of milan' or 'battle of lepanto' and I start drooling.

:colt:

p.s. this smiley selection is totally unrelated but hamsters are sick
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#2
I am beginning to love Church history.  As a newbie to tradition, I am just beginning to discover things like the Battle of Lepanto.  I am thinking on writing a piece on that for the blog in October.

History, in general, fascinates me.  The connections between the past and the present.  I would love some recommendations for good books on Church history.  Then we could drool together.  LOL  :laughing:
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#3
What would be your recommended books for an all around and solid understanding of Church history?
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#4
(02-21-2011, 02:34 PM)Gerard Wrote: What would be your recommended books for an all around and solid understanding of Church history?

Warren H. Carrol wrote a series....great Catholic writer


http://www.amazon.com/Glory-Christendom-...t_ep_dpi_2
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#5
I enjoyed reading this book:

http://www.amazon.com/Triumph-Power-Glory-Catholic-Church/dp/0761516042/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1298315841&sr=1-1
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#6
I'm a Crusades nerd myself.This is a good general intro:   http://www.amazon.com/Concise-History-Crusades-Critical-Issues/dp/0742538230/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1298316447&sr=1-1
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#7
William Thomas Walsh

http://www.catholicauthors.com/walsh.html
http://www.amazon.com/Characters-Inquisi...0895553260
http://www.marianland.com/hist019.html

Just a few links to a luminous Catholic author.

Phillip II
is a great book on not only European history, but Church history.
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#8
Anyone know the time frame or general year when it was forbidden in the west for priests, Bishops and Popes to marry and were ordered to remain celibate?? My Church history is piss poor at best, but I remember reading about some Popes in the 3rd Century that had wives and mistresses.
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#9
(02-21-2011, 05:10 PM)crusaderfortruth3372 Wrote: Anyone know the time frame or general year when it was forbidden in the west for priests, Bishops and Popes to marry and were ordered to remain celibate?? My Church history is piss poor at best, but I remember reading about some Popes in the 3rd Century that had wives and mistresses.

History of clerical celibacy
First period

Turning now to the historical development of the present law of celibacy, we must necessarily begin with St. Paul's direction (1 Timothy 3:2, 12, and Titus 1:6) that a bishop or a deacon should be "the husband of one wife". These passages seem fatal to any contention that celibacy was made obligatory upon the clergy from the beginning, but on the other hand, the Apostle's desire that other men might be as himself (1 Corinthians 7:7-8), already quoted) precludes the inference that he wished all ministers of the Gospel to be married. The words beyond doubt mean that the fitting candidate was a man, who, amongst other qualities which St. Paul enunciates as likely to make his authority respected, possessed also such stability of divorce, by remaining faithful to one wife. The direction is therefore restrictive, no injunctive; it excludes men who have married more than once, but it does not impose marriage as a necessary condition. This freedom of choice seems to have lasted during the whole of what we may call, with Vacandard, the first period of the Church's legislation, i.e. down to about the time of Constantine and the Council of Nicaea.

A strenuous attempt has indeed been made by some writers, of whom the late Professor Bickell was the most distinguished, to prove that even at this early date the Church exacted celibacy of all her ministers of the higher grades. But the contrary view, represented by such scholars as Funk and Kraus, seems much better founded and has won general acceptance of recent years. It is not, of course, disputed that all times virginity was held in honour, and that in particular large numbers of the clergy practised it or separated from their wives if they were already married. Tertullian comments with admiration upon the number of those in sacred orders who have embraced continence (De exhortatione castitatis, cap. xiii), while Origen seems to contrast the spiritual offspring of the priests of the New Law with the natural offspring begotten in wedlock by the priests of the Old (In Levit. Hom. vi, no. 6). Clearly, however, there is nothing in this or similar language which could be considered decisive, and Bickell, in support of his thesis, found it needful to appeal mainly to the testimony of writers of the fourth and fifth century. Thus Eusebius declares that it is befitting that priests and those occupied in the ministry should observe continence (Demonst. Evangel., I, C. ix), and St. Cyril of Jerusalem urges that the minister of the altar who serves God properly holds himself aloof from women (Cat. xii, 25). St. Jerome further seems to speak of a custom generally observed when he declares that clerics, "even though they may have wives, cease to be husbands".

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03481a.htm
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#10
Ha! yeah, my husband calls me the Catholic encyclopedia.  I mostly lean towards the Church doctors.  To answer your question Crusader, I believe it was during the first Lateran Council.
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