Church History
#11
(02-21-2011, 05:10 PM)crusaderfortruth3372 Wrote: Anyone know the time frame or general year when it was forbidden in the west for priests, Bishops and Popes to marry and were ordered to remain celibate?? My Church history is piss poor at best, but I remember reading about some Popes in the 3rd Century that had wives and mistresses.

I seem to remember that Pope St. Zachary (741-752) was the last Pope who was married.
Reply
#12
(02-21-2011, 06:48 PM)CrusaderKing Wrote:
(02-21-2011, 05:10 PM)crusaderfortruth3372 Wrote: Anyone know the time frame or general year when it was forbidden in the west for priests, Bishops and Popes to marry and were ordered to remain celibate?? My Church history is piss poor at best, but I remember reading about some Popes in the 3rd Century that had wives and mistresses.
married clergy

I seem to remember that Pope St. Zachary (741-752) was the last Pope who was married.

Hmm,I though Pope Z actually fought against the notion of a married Clergy..?

"...When the Frankish Church held its first reform synod in 743, it forbade any priest or deacon to live in the same house with any woman, including his wife. ..."

http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/view.cfm?id=7663&CFID=69747793&CFTOKEN=24613570

Reply
#13
So it was around the 8th Century then ? Thanks guys!!! :tiphat:
Reply
#14
Well... no.The 743 synod was condemning abuse.

"But the passage most confidently appealed to is one of St. Epiphanius ( Born at Besanduk, near Eleutheropolis, in Judea, after 310; died in 403)where the holy doctor first of all speaks of the accepted ecclesiastical rule of the priesthood (kanona tes ierosynes) as something established by the Apostles (Haer., xlviii, 9), and then in a later passage seems to describe this rule or canon in some detail. "Holy Church", he says, "respects the dignity of the priesthood to such a point that she does not admit to the diaconate, the priesthood, or the episcopate, no nor even to the subdiaconate, anyone still living in marriage and begetting children. She accepts only him who if married gives up his wife or has lost her by death, especially in those places where the ecclesiastical cannons are strictly attended to" (Haer., lix, 4). Epiphanius goes on, however, to explain that there are localities in which priests and deacons continue to have children, but he argues against the practice as most unbecoming and urges that the Church under the guidance of the Holy Ghost has always in the past shown her disapproval of such procedure..."

"...a general rule of celibacy existed from Apostolic times. Writers in the fourth century were prone to describe many practices (e.g. the Lenten fast of forty days) as of Apostolic institution which certainly had no claim to be so regarded. On the other hand, there are facts which tell the other way. The statement of Clement of Alexandria (died about the year 215)at an earlier date is open to no ambiguity. After commenting on the texts of St. Paul noted above, and expressing his veneration for a life of chastity, Clement adds: "All the same, the Church fully receives the husband of one wife whether he be priest or deacon or layman, supposing always that he uses his marriage blamelessly, and such a one shall be saved in the begetting of children" (Stromateiae, III, xiii)..."

"...Second period

In the history of clerical celibacy conciliar legislation marks the second period during which the law took definite shape both in the East and in the West. The earliest enactment on the subject is that of the Spanish Council of Elvira (between 295 and 302) in canon xxxiii. It imposes celibacy upon the three higher orders of the clergy, bishops, priests, and deacons. If they continue to live with their wives and beget children after their ordination they are to be deposed."

you need to read this really:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03481a.htm


Reply
#15
(02-21-2011, 02:34 PM)Gerard Wrote: What would be your recommended books for an all around and solid understanding of Church history?

- The didache series (one of three parts) entitled 'the History of the Church'
- Eusebius of Caesaria 'History of the Church'
                  - There are many references within these that you can also read, eg Josephus' works
- Wikipedia, ;D
Reply
#16
(02-21-2011, 07:11 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote:
(02-21-2011, 06:48 PM)CrusaderKing Wrote:
(02-21-2011, 05:10 PM)crusaderfortruth3372 Wrote: Anyone know the time frame or general year when it was forbidden in the west for priests, Bishops and Popes to marry and were ordered to remain celibate?? My Church history is piss poor at best, but I remember reading about some Popes in the 3rd Century that had wives and mistresses.
married clergy

I seem to remember that Pope St. Zachary (741-752) was the last Pope who was married.

Hmm,I though Pope Z actually fought against the notion of a married Clergy..?

"...When the Frankish Church held its first reform synod in 743, it forbade any priest or deacon to live in the same house with any woman, including his wife. ..."

http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/view.cfm?id=7663&CFID=69747793&CFTOKEN=24613570

Looks like I was wrong. There was a Pope who was married before taking Orders and upon his election as Pope (Adrian II, 867-872) and another Pope who had been married prior to taking orders and had been a widower before his election as Pope, Honorius IV (1285-1287.)
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)