What landed in my comments boxes (Was Hitler a Catholic?)
#11
I will always remember the story Fr. Corapi told about Hitler. There was a young boy that was serving Mass at the Cathedral for the Bishop. The young boy dropped the cruet and it shattered loudly on the cathedral floor. The Bishop got mad and told the boy to get out. The boy ran out of the Church and never came back. On the other side of the world another young boy dropped the cruet on the floor of the cathedral and his Bishop told the boy "That makes a loud noise when it drops doesn't it?" The Bishop then told the boy he was going to go to the seminary and he would eventually become a Bishop just like him. The first little boy was Adolf Hitler...the second boy was Archbishop Fulton Sheen.

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#12
(02-26-2011, 03:05 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote:
(02-26-2011, 03:04 PM)alaric Wrote:
(02-26-2011, 03:01 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote: In a search just now an interesting Q was raised by a blogger:

Why didn't the Catholic church ever excommunicate Hitler?

Can an excommunication be posthumous?
OK, what does it take to be "excommunicated"?

Something tells me Hitler never directly attacked the Church itself. (Or it's dogmas, at least publicly)

The Church recently excommunicated a woman and her Doctor for performing an abortion on the daughter.
Understandable............what does this have to do with Hitler?

did he publicly come out for abortion?

what about all of our "catholic" politicians in the West today?
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#13
Black areas were predominantly Catholic in the 1930s:
[Image: map1.JPG]

Here is the election results for the Nazis.  White areas voted against Hitler.  I post it without comment:

[Image: map2.JPG]

From this website:  http://www.earlychurchfathers.org/fullci...111-105202
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#14
Hitler was not Catholic, so excommunicating him would be silly.
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#15
(02-26-2011, 03:10 PM)Christus Imperat Wrote:
(02-26-2011, 08:27 AM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: This is the fallacy known as "guilt by association." It's too puerile to be taken seriously.

Hitler was Austrian, he was baptized and went to Church in his early days like most people at the time. Nevertheless, during adulthood, his political views made him distance himself from the Church and Christianity in general. In no way did he present himself to the public life of the party and Germany as a defender or promotor of Catholicism. There's nothing distinctively "Catholic" or "Christian" about national-socialism, quite the contrary.

If we were to dismiss religions because of "guilt by association," then German Lutheranism would be condemned from the get-go since the majority of the supporters of the Nazi regime were Protestants. Muslims in Palestine also sympathized with Hitler. Some of them, like Ahmadinejad, still do today. The same can be said of atheists, especially regarding Communism which was even more criminal than Nazism. We can pretty much dismiss anyone outright if we accept "guilt by association."

What you have to teach to this person is, first and foremost, how to think. His comments are nonsensical.

I have a book called "Hitler's Table Talk" which includes speeches and minutes of discussions among Hitler and Nazi higherups.  He attacked the Catholic Church vociferously in some of his talks, and the interesting part is that he uses a lot of liberal talking points.  He says things like the Church is only interested in money, and the Priests exist to dupe people out of money, and that the Church has held back civilization and opposed national socialism because of its regressive outlook. 
Of course this is all second-hand knowledge about what Hitler "allegdly" said.

The point here is, evidence. Did he publicly come out and comdemn the papacy or Church dogma on a public forum ever?

Didn't the Church actually sign a Concordadt with the Nazis?
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#16
(02-26-2011, 03:15 PM)alaric Wrote: Understandable............what does this have to do with Hitler?

did he publicly come out for abortion?

what about all of our "catholic" politicians in the West today?

Huh,  is this a genuine response? You seem to have managed to  to pull of a logical/intellectual disconnect in  the space of just 1 posting....amazing.
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#17
(02-26-2011, 03:17 PM)James02 Wrote: Hitler was not Catholic, so excommunicating him would be silly.
Mmm..technically your wrong so the question is still an interesting one I never considered before.
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#18
Found this:

"“For the record, Hitler persecuted the Catholic Church and was automatically excommunicated in 1931—two years before he assumed power—when he acted as best man at Joseph Goebbel’s Protestant wedding. Hitler even bragged about his separation from the Church. As for doing nothing about the Holocaust, Sir Martin Gilbert reminds us that Goebbels denounced Pope Pius XII for his 1942 Christmas message criticizing the Nazis (the New York Times lauded the pope for doing so in an editorial for two years in a row). Much to Hagee’s chagrin, Gilbert also says that Pius XII saved three quarters of the Jews in Rome, and that more Jews were saved proportionately in Catholic countries than Protestant countries. Indeed, Israeli diplomat Pinchas Lapide credited the Catholic Church with saving 860,000 Jews. No religion can match that."

http://www.catholicleague.org/release.php?id=1393
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#19
(02-26-2011, 03:05 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote:
(02-26-2011, 03:04 PM)alaric Wrote:
(02-26-2011, 03:01 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote: In a search just now an interesting Q was raised by a blogger:

Why didn't the Catholic church ever excommunicate Hitler?

Can an excommunication be posthumous?
OK, what does it take to be "excommunicated"?

Something tells me Hitler never directly attacked the Church itself. (Or it's dogmas, at least publicly)

The Church recently excommunicated a woman and her Doctor for performing an abortion on the daughter.

By Canon Law abortion is excommunicable.  The Church has laws; She doesn't apply excommunication to "bad people" there needs to be a particular offense.
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#20
(02-26-2011, 03:42 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote:
(02-26-2011, 03:05 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote:
(02-26-2011, 03:04 PM)alaric Wrote:
(02-26-2011, 03:01 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote: In a search just now an interesting Q was raised by a blogger:

Why didn't the Catholic church ever excommunicate Hitler?

Can an excommunication be posthumous?
OK, what does it take to be "excommunicated"?

Something tells me Hitler never directly attacked the Church itself. (Or it's dogmas, at least publicly)

The Church recently excommunicated a woman and her Doctor for performing an abortion on the daughter.

By Canon Law abortion is excommunicable.  The Church has laws; She doesn't apply excommunication to "bad people" there needs to be a particular offense.

But what is abortion but the killing of an innocent.We know the Nazis engaged in such killing (including abortion) .Does it then become an individual matter? The Church does excommunicate whole groups however.Perhaps the  question should be, "Why were the Nazi party not formally excommunicated" ? Still an interesting question...
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