Ash Wednesday NO Mass today
#11
(03-09-2011, 05:43 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: Ash Wednesday is not a Holy Day of Obligation. 

Right. When I was at Wichita State (A temporary lapse, WRC. Just a temporary lapse! :laughing:), the Chaplain at St Paul's used to tell us not to remind anyone that it wasn't. We got our largest collection of the year from all the profs and staff who thought it was and couldn't make it to their home parishes because of work!
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#12
(03-09-2011, 05:49 PM)Anthem Wrote: [quote='WhollyRoaminCatholic' pid='712706' dateline='1299707001']

Really, I think that people like getting ashes exactly for the reason we are cautioned against in the Gospel on Ash Wednesday -- so everyone knows they are penitent.

I have always found the Gospel of ash wednesday and the ashes on foreheads kinda weird. The Gospel tells us not to do exactly what we ARE doing. For this I have never been a fan of ash wednesday and I usually just stay home.
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#13
By the way, when/how are ashes imposed during a TLM on Ash Wednesday?  Can laymen or deacons participate in the imposition?  Is "Remember man you are dust...." in Latin?
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#14
(03-09-2011, 05:09 PM)MaidenofGod Wrote: :o That is terrrrrible.
They are making a mockery out of the mass.
:pray: Lord have mercy! How could the priest say such things.  ???

The N.O. Mass is a mockery in and of itself.
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#15
(03-09-2011, 05:49 PM)Anthem Wrote:
(03-09-2011, 05:43 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:
(03-09-2011, 05:35 PM)Pheo Wrote: Unless I drive over to Detroit, I only have the option of a pretty rowdy NO Mass tonight.  I'm not sure I can stomach it...maybe I'll spend the time in prayer instead.  ???

Ash Wednesday is not a Holy Day of Obligation.  It's usually too crowded for me at the NO's that I forgo it and begin my penance at home.

When people speak of Christmas and Easter Catholics, they really ought to include Ash Wednesday.   My dear dad, God rest his soul, used to say that people came to Mass on Ash Wednesday because they thought they were getting something extra becuase of the imposition of ashes.  Kinda like how everyone liked to show up on Feb. 3 for the Blessing of Throats.

Really, I think that people like getting ashes exactly for the reason we are cautioned against in the Gospel on Ash Wednesday -- so everyone knows they are penitent.

I don't know that that is the reason why they are getting ashes (no offense to your dear departed Dad [God rest his soul!]).  It is just something that they feel they should do - like showing up for a palm on Palm Sunday.  (As an aside, a traditional priest I used to know, who has gone to his reward, used to call them A & P Catholics.)  When I worked in a big city, people were lined up out the front door of the Church down the street to the corner to get ashes during their lunch hour.   
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#16
(03-09-2011, 06:08 PM)Anthem Wrote:   Is "Remember man you are dust...." in Latin?

Every NO ash wed. I have been to they never said that, not inclusive enough. They said something like "turn away from sin and obey the gospel" or something like that.
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#17
(03-09-2011, 06:08 PM)Anthem Wrote: By the way, when/how are ashes imposed during a TLM on Ash Wednesday?  Can laymen or deacons participate in the imposition?  Is "Remember man you are dust...." in Latin?

Since deacons may distribute Communion and give simple blessings to people, I don't see why they couldn't impose the ashes on the laity. However, in a solemn Mass, the deacon of the Mass (the one wearing the dalmatic) is supposed to stand at the priest's right hand during the rite, holding the ashes for him. If there are extra deacons, then they can probably split up. Also, according to "Matters Liturgical", page 964, the deacon may not impose ashes on the priest-celebrant, no matter what his personal rank is (even if he's a cardinal, then?). The celebrant is supposed to receive them from the highest ranking prelate or priest present. If none are available, then he imposes them on himself.

Also, interestingly, all clerics (including deacons) are supposed to receive the ashes on the crown, not the forehead. So this book says, anyway.
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#18
(03-09-2011, 06:08 PM)Anthem Wrote: By the way, when/how are ashes imposed during a TLM on Ash Wednesday?  Can laymen or deacons participate in the imposition?  Is "Remember man you are dust...." in Latin?

At my Parish this morning the Ashes were imposed before Mass. Each of the parishioners coming forward and kneeling at the communion rail just as when receiving the Holy Eucharist. Only the Priest imposed the ashes, saying to each one as he did: "Memento, homo, quia pulvis es, et in pulverim reverteris."

Thank God none of this Novus Ordo nonsense.
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#19
(03-09-2011, 06:07 PM)Baskerville Wrote:
(03-09-2011, 05:49 PM)Anthem Wrote: Really, I think that people like getting ashes exactly for the reason we are cautioned against in the Gospel on Ash Wednesday -- so everyone knows they are penitent.

I have always found the Gospel of ash wednesday and the ashes on foreheads kinda weird. The Gospel tells us not to do exactly what we ARE doing. For this I have never been a fan of ash wednesday and I usually just stay home.

I know someone who feels this way but she goes to Mass and then washes the ashes off once she's home.
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#20
(03-09-2011, 07:09 PM)Lavalliere Wrote:
(03-09-2011, 05:49 PM)Anthem Wrote:
(03-09-2011, 05:43 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:
(03-09-2011, 05:35 PM)Pheo Wrote: Unless I drive over to Detroit, I only have the option of a pretty rowdy NO Mass tonight.  I'm not sure I can stomach it...maybe I'll spend the time in prayer instead.  ???

Ash Wednesday is not a Holy Day of Obligation.  It's usually too crowded for me at the NO's that I forgo it and begin my penance at home.

When people speak of Christmas and Easter Catholics, they really ought to include Ash Wednesday.   My dear dad, God rest his soul, used to say that people came to Mass on Ash Wednesday because they thought they were getting something extra becuase of the imposition of ashes.  Kinda like how everyone liked to show up on Feb. 3 for the Blessing of Throats.

Really, I think that people like getting ashes exactly for the reason we are cautioned against in the Gospel on Ash Wednesday -- so everyone knows they are penitent.

I don't know that that is the reason why they are getting ashes (no offense to your dear departed Dad [God rest his soul!]).  It is just something that they feel they should do - like showing up for a palm on Palm Sunday.  (As an aside, a traditional priest I used to know, who has gone to his reward, used to call them A & P Catholics.)  When I worked in a big city, people were lined up out the front door of the Church down the street to the corner to get ashes during their lunch hour.   

I'm changing my opinion on why NO Catholics flock to Ash Wednesday even when they miss their Sunday obligations-- I used to think it was because they would "get" something, like a token or a door prize-- even if it's an crossish smear.

My new opinion is that even semi-lapsed Catholics WISH they were better Catholics, even if they don't have the resolve to do it.  Lent is optimistic in its penance.  People gravitate to that, even if they aren't very good at carrying out their penance or even if they don't have a very good sense of spiritual priorities.
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