Ash Wednesday NO Mass today
#21
I think for many it's just because it's a tradition--people like traditions. especially those traditions that are unique. The most worldly Catholics I know who never go to Mass, sleep around, support all sorts of perversions and whatnot, still won't eat meat on Lenten Fridays. So many traditions have been cast aside, but even the most nominal of Catholics try and keep the ones that are left.
Reply
#22
(03-09-2011, 04:54 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: It's a disease.  A horrible, horrible disease, worse than AIDS, because it kills the soul.

Novus Ordo delenda est. 

It is absolutely amazing that so many secular and religious organizations and individuals are so willing to come to the aid of the sick body, while forfeiting the sickly soul. Have we all forgotten that man is body AND soul, and that the soul is superior by nature. The root of the problem is the lack of faith; if we can heal the sick (in the metaphysical sense) than we can heal the body too. That is, with a righteous soul, all physical pains will seem trivial. 
Reply
#23
(03-09-2011, 08:58 PM)SaintSebastian Wrote: I think for many it's just because it's a tradition--people like traditions. especially those traditions that are unique. The most worldly Catholics I know who never go to Mass, sleep around, support all sorts of perversions and whatnot, still won't eat meat on Lenten Fridays. So many traditions have been cast aside, but even the most nominal of Catholics try and keep the ones that are left.

This has been my observation as well.  This leads to the defensible opinion that many people are hungry for tradition and Tradition, and would probably respond very well to a return to the TLM, despite what the liberals say. 
Reply
#24
(03-09-2011, 08:53 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: I'm changing my opinion on why NO Catholics flock to Ash Wednesday even when they miss their Sunday obligations-- I used to think it was because they would "get" something, like a token or a door prize-- even if it's an crossish smear.

My new opinion is that even semi-lapsed Catholics WISH they were better Catholics, even if they don't have the resolve to do it.  Lent is optimistic in its penance.  People gravitate to that, even if they aren't very good at carrying out their penance or even if they don't have a very good sense of spiritual priorities.

Sort of like new year's resolutions?

The priest at the TLM tonight said in his homily "take away penance from the church, and there'll be decadence. No penance: decadence" He was describing penance as a form of sacrifice... made reference to Fatima (which I'd never heard about in the NO)... said it's ironic that the church relaxed fasting disciplines a few decades ago when we need it now more than ever... said that earthly penances are easier than cleansing in purgatory (which wasn't a huge topic in the NO either).

Me love TLM.
Reply
#25
(03-09-2011, 09:54 PM)Anthem Wrote:
(03-09-2011, 08:58 PM)SaintSebastian Wrote: I think for many it's just because it's a tradition--people like traditions. especially those traditions that are unique. The most worldly Catholics I know who never go to Mass, sleep around, support all sorts of perversions and whatnot, still won't eat meat on Lenten Fridays. So many traditions have been cast aside, but even the most nominal of Catholics try and keep the ones that are left.

This has been my observation as well.  This leads to the defensible opinion that many people are hungry for tradition and Tradition, and would probably respond very well to a return to the TLM, despite what the liberals say. 

Absolutely, those of the younger generation are searching for the remnant of traditions of the Fathers. Give us orthodoxy or give us death!
Reply
#26
(03-09-2011, 04:46 PM)Anthem Wrote: I went to Mass at noon today, and really had a disappointing experience.  It was a NO Mass, since I have no TLM close by.  Anyway, here are some quotes from the priest's homily:

“I know you all need to get back to work today, so I’m only going to preach for 15 minutes.” [Big laughs from the audience]

“I was over at the school this morning and some of the young people there asked me what I was going to give up for Lent.  You know what I told them I’m giving up?  ‘Nothing’.  I’m going to do something positive.  I’m going to concentrate on showing my love for Jesus.”

“The primary purpose of confession is not to forgive sins, but to teach us humility.  Confession was instituted to teach us humility.”

“We’re going to distribute the ashes now.  The bishop blessed ‘em this morning, so that’s done.  I’m going to give the deacon some, and some to our, uh, well, uh, helpers.  And then the deacon will give me some.  I’ve already got them, but then I’ll get another dose.  I need it, really I do.”  [laughter] “And the servers, but some of ‘em got them already too, but they’ll get more.” [more laughs]  [exit, stage right]

[oopsy, return to mic..leaning in to say] “When you come forward for ashes, you may hear ‘Remember man, you are dust, and to dust you shall return’ or ‘Turn away from sin and be faithful to the Gospel’.”  [pregnant pause] “If you hear the second one, it isn’t because we think you are a sinner or actually need to turn away from sin. So don’t be offended.”  [Hearty, extended, laughter from the audience]

So, I went up and had ashes imposed by a “helper” who said nothing.  After I sat down, a couple of  older ladies behind me sat down and started talking.  One said, “That man didn’t say anything when he put the ashes on me.  Did he say anything to you?”  The other said, “No, maybe he wasn’t supposed to?”  The first said, “You’d think he would have said something.”  The second, “Maybe he’s saying it to himself.”  The first, “What would be the point of that?  Look at him, he’s not moving his lips or anything.  What sort of Ash Wednesday is this?”


Sigh.

Yep. What do you expect of the Novus Ordo... That's why I won't go near them anymore.
Reply
#27
(03-09-2011, 07:44 PM)Thomas58 Wrote:
(03-09-2011, 06:08 PM)Anthem Wrote: By the way, when/how are ashes imposed during a TLM on Ash Wednesday?  Can laymen or deacons participate in the imposition?  Is "Remember man you are dust...." in Latin?

At my Parish this morning the Ashes were imposed before Mass. Each of the parishioners coming forward and kneeling at the communion rail just as when receiving the Holy Eucharist. Only the Priest imposed the ashes, saying to each one as he did: "Memento, homo, quia pulvis es, et in pulverim reverteris."

Thank God none of this Novus Ordo nonsense.

This was how we received ashes at the evening service I attended, as well. There was no homily.
Reply
#28
(03-09-2011, 08:58 PM)SaintSebastian Wrote: I think for many it's just because it's a tradition--people like traditions. especially those traditions that are unique. The most worldly Catholics I know who never go to Mass, sleep around, support all sorts of perversions and whatnot, still won't eat meat on Lenten Fridays. So many traditions have been cast aside, but even the most nominal of Catholics try and keep the ones that are left.

Yes, I think this is exactly it.

Regarding the point of showing one's ashes being a form of showing off one's penitential spirit, I don't think that is the case. I think when you step out of church wearing your ashes, they take on the meaning of "I am a follower of Christ. I am Catholic." I went to a Baptist school, and always loved to show my little ash smudge on the second day of Lent.

Today I missed Mass because I wasn't feeling well. Which provided good cover, as I didn't want to go because the people at the local parish like to make stuff up for Ash Wednesday Mass. Three years ago, following the recommendation of the diocese, they had us impose the ashes upon each other. I don't know what went on this year, but my sisters returned with a toothpick broken in two and a piece of silver cord as materials to make a cross.

A quick defense of an N.O. priest. Two years ago, I was at an university in the South. The campus chapel's priest took the opportunity of having some extra Catholics in the chapel on Ash Wednesday to say that those who had not been to Mass in a while should not receive Communion until they went to Confession, which he would make available right after Mass. He reminded us to go to Mass every Sunday and on Holy Days of Obligation and to Confess regularly (unless we were saints). He did the same on Easter and whenever he saw the chapel curiously packed. God bless him.
Reply
#29
Your presence indicated approval. You participated in this farce. Don't act so exasperated. If you were, you wouldn't ever show up at a Novus Ordo again.
Reply
#30
(03-09-2011, 11:56 PM)Monica07 Wrote: This was how we received ashes at the evening service I attended, as well. There was no homily.

Likewise for my self, though a letter from the bishop concerning Lent was read to us after the Epistle and Gospel in English.  I really do feel sorry for those who cannot get to a TLM for all their occasions :(.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)