Dead Mouse in the House
#11
I'll tell my husband, who doesn't want a housecat. (The Child and I do.)

I just spent a disgusting evening cleaning up waterlogged mouse poo after the ancient pipe fittings burst when we pulled out the washing machine to check behind it for dead meeses. But we found two meese! I'm sure there are more, but phew -- how could anything so small be so stinky?
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#12
(03-15-2011, 11:51 PM)Satori Wrote: how could anything so small be so stinky?

God made death (rotting corpses, actually) smell bad for a reason.  It carries disease and should be avoided.  By the time you smell something, there is enough bacteria active on there to make you pretty sick.  So, it's a good thing that rotting flesh is putrid.

If you want to convince your husband to get a cat, let him clean up the waterlogged poo.  After a few times doing that my guess is he'll get a cat.
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#13
He will get a housecat if I push hard enough. I will use this as ammunition.

Everybody says to use traps, not poison, but the two times I've had a rodent infestation, poison was the only thing that worked. I think rodents wise up to traps. I'm convinced that they warn each other about them.
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#14
Rats are very wary about traps, but you can get them.  I've gotten tons of rats with traps (hope Vox isn't reading this as she has pet rats).  Mice aren't as smart and are actually easier to get.

You do need to place them properly though.  Check out the link I posted.  Most people place them wrong or don't use enough.  Or they use cheese or something as bait.  Use peanut butter; smear some on the trigger and they can't run off with that.  You can also bait the trap without setting it so they get used to it, then one day set it.  Surprise....

Another key to traps is you need to remove the other food supplies so they get hungry and willing to go after the bait.  If they have access to that bag of chips in your pantry, they're not going to bother with the trap.

Again, glueboards work, too, especially in meese traffic areas, but you either have to be willing to smack the critter so it doesn't die a suffering death of dehydration or callous enough to let it.
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#15
Even if mice aren't as smart as their vile cousins, I'm convinced their clan leaders warn the aspiring young hunters about traps before sending them on their way to get seeds and bits of insulation. But probably, yes, I've just been setting the traps wrong. I hate traps.
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#16
Contrary to what Fievel was told, there are cats in America and the streets aren't paved with cheese.

I agree, cats make the best defenders against those mice and other unwanted guests.  Sometimes, my cats think a twist tie from a loaf of bread is something dangerous and they attack with full vigor.  :laughing:
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#17
You have to think like a hunter when setting traps - put them in likely avenues of approach.  Direct them to your traps by moving stuff around so that they have to go through them, like place a trap in the space between the fridge and the wall. 

Quis' suggestion to use peanut butter is spot on.  Cats are very effective, as well.


(03-15-2011, 05:30 PM)Satori Wrote: You're dying to come over for dinner now, right?

Like Quis said,  :eats:
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#18
(03-17-2011, 07:51 AM)LRThunder Wrote: I agree, cats make the best defenders against those mice and other unwanted guests.  Sometimes, my cats think a twist tie from a loaf of bread is something dangerous and they attack with full vigor.  :laughing:

I realized my cats will play with a crumpled up $1 bill as much as they will play with a $2 toy and the paper money lasts longer.  So now I just throw money on the floor.  :laughing:
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#19
If your husband won't give you a cat to chase the mice, he never will give you a cat. So, I say push for it and good luck.  :)

A thought crossed my mind... are you certain that your daughter isn't allergic to cats? If you and your husband aren't I'm assuming your daughter isn't, either. But it'd be best to find out beforehand   :bheart:--it prolly would break her dear little heart to have to give up a new kitty due to unforeseen allergies.

If your husband still says "No" to a cat, then poison traps are the way to go. Worked great here so I have to disagree with Quis on that.
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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#20
He will do it, Jaca. Actually, it's not that he frequently puts his foot down and refuses to let me have something I want, it's that he obviously doesn't want things so I don't demand. I am going to demand a housecat. Nicely.

We are not allergic to them, at least not very. We've had cats most of our marriage and the problem is the hair on the sofa and the stinky litter box. But I have said I will change the box everyday. And I will get a good lint brush.
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