masturbation
#41
(04-03-2011, 05:32 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote:
(04-03-2011, 12:31 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(03-29-2011, 06:03 PM)INPEFESS Wrote:
(03-26-2011, 10:35 PM)love alabama Wrote: Why is masturbation sinful?

. . . because pleasure is the secondary function of the generative faculty; procreation is the primary function of generative faculty: The secondary function (sexual pleasure) is ordered to complement and tend to the fulfillment of the primary function (procreation); the primary function (procreation) cannot be logically said to complement or tend to the fulfillment of the secondary function (sexual pleasure). (Presumably, it is not the will to have a child that provides sexual stimulation.)


Very good post.

I agree!

Thank you, gentlemen.
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#42

[/quote]

Thank you, gentlemen.
[/quote]

I agree. INPEFESS your posts are always informative.
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#43
(04-07-2011, 03:23 PM)HammerOfHeretics Wrote:
Quote:Thank you, gentlemen.

I agree. INPEFESS your posts are always informative.

I'm glad you find them helpful and useful.

But, to be fair, though they may be useful to some, they are also usually long-winded, tedious, redundant, obtuse, exhaustive, and fraught with grammatical errors.

According to God's will, I'm working on fixing all of the above because I know there are many who don't bother to read them because of the length (among other reasons).

Thank you all for your generous encouragement. Benedicamus Domino!
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#44

Did St. Augustine actually say it is at most a venial sin?

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#45
(04-07-2011, 03:35 PM)richness of tradition Wrote: Did St. Augustine actually say it is at most a venial sin?

I never heard that. :shrug:  I would doubt it given what he's said about concupiscence, at least that I've read.
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#46
(04-07-2011, 03:35 PM)richness of tradition Wrote: Did St. Augustine actually say it is at most a venial sin?

I have had both trad and NO priests tell me that it's a mortal sin. Not that they necessarily have more authority than St. Augustine, but Catholic dogma had yet to be fully defined in his day. Of course, the modern definition is that a mortal sin requires (a) grave matter, (b) full knowledge, and © full consent, and you can always try to fudge the last two. But I think it's generally agreed that any misuse of sexual capacity constitutes "grave matter". It's probably safest to treat it as a mortal sin in any event -- if you succumb, get to confession as soon as possible, and avoid receiving Communion in the meantime.
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#47
(04-07-2011, 03:35 PM)richness of tradition Wrote: Did St. Augustine actually say it is at most a venial sin?
I highly doubt that. From what I remember, St. Augustine held the particularly austere opinion that even marital relations were often venially sinful.

ETA: cf. Marriage and Concupiscence Book 1 Chapter 16 [XIV.]— A Certain Degree of Intemperance is to Be Tolerated in the Case of Married Persons; The Use of Matrimony for the Mere Pleasure of Lust is Not Without Sin, But Because of the Nuptial Relation the Sin is Venial.
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#48
This thread is like a bad penny.
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#49
(04-07-2011, 09:31 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote: This thread is like a bad penny.

Bad penny

Posted by ESC on May 11, 2000

In Reply to: Bad penny posted by curious on May 10, 2000

: I heard someone say "like a bad penny" and was wondering what it means. Can anyone help?

"BAD PENNY -- The phrase usually is heard in this country (U.S.) as 'A bad penny always turns up,' meaning that a no-good person can be counted upon to come back again and again. The expression was originally English and the unit of currency referred to was the shilling. Sir Walter Scott, in one of his early nineteenth-century novels, whereto: 'Bring back Darsie? Little doubt of that. The bad shilling is sure enough to come back again.'" From "Morris Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins" by William and Mary Morris (HarperCollins, New York, 1977, 1988).

--http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/4/messages/1231.html
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#50
(04-07-2011, 03:35 PM)richness of tradition Wrote: Did St. Augustine actually say it is at most a venial sin?

In De Trinitate, in his analogy of the Trinity with the functions of the mind, Augustine references an acquaintance, who by merely thinking about a woman can control the ejaculatory functions of the body.
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