Mediatrix
#11
(04-02-2011, 11:10 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote: I am leery with the titles of co-Redemptrix and co-Mediatrix. I think we have gone too far to honor the saints, to take away from the latria and contemplation of the divine. God is the source of all grace, redemption and salvation. Jesus, fully divine and human, is the true mediator and intercessor. It is great that we honour the saints, absolutely, but in our efforts to find a human to look to in admiration and as a model, we have forgotten that Christ also is FULLY human. We can always look to Him as our chief inspiration, let us not forget, lest He seem some distant deity like before the incarnation.


Mediatrix does not mean source of grace, but mediator of grace. Likewise, the title does not mean mediator of justice, of which Christ is the only one. Here's a portion of the explanation from St. Pius X which I posted above:

13. It cannot, of course, be denied that the dispensation of these treasures is the particular and peculiar right of Jesus Christ, for they are the exclusive fruit of His Death, who by His nature is the mediator between God and man. Nevertheless, by this companionship in sorrow and suffering already mentioned between the Mother and the Son, it has been allowed to the august Virgin to be the most powerful mediatrix and advocate of the whole world with her Divine Son (Pius IX. Ineffabilis). The source, then, is Jesus Christ "of whose fullness we have all received" (John i., 16), "from whom the whole body, being compacted and fitly joined together by what every joint supplieth, according to the operation in the measure of every part, maketh increase of the body unto the edifying of itself in charity" (Ephesians iv., 16). But Mary, as St. Bernard justly remarks, is the channel (Serm. de temp on the Nativ. B. V. De Aquaeductu n. 4); or, if you will, the connecting portion the function of which is to join the body to the head and to transmit to the body the influences and volitions of the head -- We mean the neck. Yes, says St. Bernardine of Sienna, "she is the neck of Our Head, by which He communicates to His mystical body all spiritual gifts" (Quadrag. de Evangel. aetern. Serm. x., a. 3, c. iii.).

14. We are then, it will be seen, very far from attributing to the Mother of God a productive power of grace -- a power which belongs to God alone. Yet, since Mary carries it over all in holiness and union with Jesus Christ, and has been associated by Jesus Christ in the work of redemption, she merits for us "de congruo," in the language of theologians, what Jesus Christ merits for us "de condigno," and she is the supreme Minister of the distribution of graces. Jesus "sitteth on the right hand of the majesty on high" (Hebrews i. b.). Mary sitteth at the right hand of her Son -- a refuge so secure and a help so trusty against all dangers that we have nothing to fear or to despair of under her guidance, her patronage, her protection. (Pius IX. in Bull Ineffabilis).

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#12
Also, here are a bunch of Marian prayers from Saints throughout the centuries which show how the Fathers and Doctors of the Church have view this:

http://campus.udayton.edu/mary/prayers/S...rayers.htm

Note, there's three pages, the prayers on each page are in chronological order, but the pages are not (ie page 2 goes back and starts with more Fathers)
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#13
(04-02-2011, 11:10 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote: I am leery with the titles of co-Redemptrix and co-Mediatrix. I think we have gone too far to honor the saints, to take away from the latria and contemplation of the divine. God is the source of all grace, redemption and salvation. Jesus, fully divine and human, is the true mediator and intercessor. It is great that we honour the saints, absolutely, but in our efforts to find a human to look to in admiration and as a model, we have forgotten that Christ also is FULLY human. We can always look to Him as our chief inspiration, let us not forget, lest He seem some distant deity like before the incarnation.

Do not be afraid to honor Our Lady too much!  Remember (from True Devotion) that as Christ was born of His mother Mary, so we as members of His Mystical Body must also be born of her as He is the head of the body.  If we have not Mary for our Mother, than we are not part of Christ's Mystical Body.  The surest sign that someone is a heretic, reprobate or schismatic is that they disdain, or at least play down, devotion to Our Blessed Lady.
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#14
(04-03-2011, 08:39 AM)SaintSebastian Wrote: Mediatrix does not mean source of grace, but mediator of grace. Likewise, the title does not mean mediator of justice, of which Christ is the only one.

This!! Why can't questions be answered this easily all the time? Thanks SaintSebastian!!!
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#15
(04-03-2011, 02:49 PM)randomtradguy Wrote:
(04-03-2011, 08:39 AM)SaintSebastian Wrote: Mediatrix does not mean source of grace, but mediator of grace. Likewise, the title does not mean mediator of justice, of which Christ is the only one.

This!! Why can't questions be answered this easily all the time? Thanks SaintSebastian!!!

Because you haven't asked St. Sebastian before!

I agree, good clear and concise answer.  :thumb:
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#16
(04-03-2011, 08:39 AM)SaintSebastian Wrote:
(04-02-2011, 11:10 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote: I am leery with the titles of co-Redemptrix and co-Mediatrix. I think we have gone too far to honor the saints, to take away from the latria and contemplation of the divine. God is the source of all grace, redemption and salvation. Jesus, fully divine and human, is the true mediator and intercessor. It is great that we honour the saints, absolutely, but in our efforts to find a human to look to in admiration and as a model, we have forgotten that Christ also is FULLY human. We can always look to Him as our chief inspiration, let us not forget, lest He seem some distant deity like before the incarnation.


Mediatrix does not mean source of grace, but mediator of grace. Likewise, the title does not mean mediator of justice, of which Christ is the only one. Here's a portion of the explanation from St. Pius X which I posted above:

13. It cannot, of course, be denied that the dispensation of these treasures is the particular and peculiar right of Jesus Christ, for they are the exclusive fruit of His Death, who by His nature is the mediator between God and man. Nevertheless, by this companionship in sorrow and suffering already mentioned between the Mother and the Son, it has been allowed to the august Virgin to be the most powerful mediatrix and advocate of the whole world with her Divine Son (Pius IX. Ineffabilis). The source, then, is Jesus Christ "of whose fullness we have all received" (John i., 16), "from whom the whole body, being compacted and fitly joined together by what every joint supplieth, according to the operation in the measure of every part, maketh increase of the body unto the edifying of itself in charity" (Ephesians iv., 16). But Mary, as St. Bernard justly remarks, is the channel (Serm. de temp on the Nativ. B. V. De Aquaeductu n. 4); or, if you will, the connecting portion the function of which is to join the body to the head and to transmit to the body the influences and volitions of the head -- We mean the neck. Yes, says St. Bernardine of Sienna, "she is the neck of Our Head, by which He communicates to His mystical body all spiritual gifts" (Quadrag. de Evangel. aetern. Serm. x., a. 3, c. iii.).

14. We are then, it will be seen, very far from attributing to the Mother of God a productive power of grace -- a power which belongs to God alone. Yet, since Mary carries it over all in holiness and union with Jesus Christ, and has been associated by Jesus Christ in the work of redemption, she merits for us "de congruo," in the language of theologians, what Jesus Christ merits for us "de condigno," and she is the supreme Minister of the distribution of graces. Jesus "sitteth on the right hand of the majesty on high" (Hebrews i. b.). Mary sitteth at the right hand of her Son -- a refuge so secure and a help so trusty against all dangers that we have nothing to fear or to despair of under her guidance, her patronage, her protection. (Pius IX. in Bull Ineffabilis).

Very Good! Thank you, SaintSebastian. But you said the quotes were from St. Pius X, but the end citation credits Bl. Pius IX. A little confused.
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