Corsets?
#11
I have a girdle/body slimmer thing that isn't too bad to wear...I wear it when I'm wearing a particularly form-fitting dress and I don't want my bulges to show.....just saying.  But I wouldn't wear this thing around the house or out to the grocery store, as my normally long, loose skirts don't demand it.
Christina
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#12
Sometimes it would be nice to wear something that forced me to maintain good posture.
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#13
(04-12-2011, 10:13 AM)Satori Wrote: Sometimes it would be nice to wear something that forced me to maintain good posture.
This is one of the major advantages of a corset. I've actually studied several books on corsetry as I find the topic very interesting. They confer an elegant shape to women (or men--though I don't wear a corset), encourage good posture, and moderate eating habits. The allegations that corsets were barbaric contraptions invented to persecute women is complete fallacy. Historically, tightlacing (where a woman cinches a corset above 5-7 inches) was much less common than moderate compression. Even without severe compression, a corset can lend structure to outer garments and cast an excellent silhouette. When you hear stories about women fainting in corsets those stories are invariably exaggerated. Either two things happened: a slender women tightlaced in excess of 13" or a woman tightlaced without adequate corset training. It's a very gradual process, and it takes a long time. Ideally, a woman would be corseted with very mild constriction (1-2") from the age of 16 twenty three hours a day/ seven days a week and the constriction would be increased up to 1 inch a month until the desired waist circumference was achieved. If anyone needs advice on building a corset, I have several books on the subject that have proven very useful. It's not as difficult as one might imagine.

ETA: verenaerin, you're mistaken. Overbust corsets were quite common, and even if a woman was only wearing an underbust corset they would generally wear some form of support for the bust also.
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#14
St. Drogo, are you a young man? Because I foresee a future for you as a tailor or corsetiere. The world needs more well-made, well-structured, elegant clothing for both men and women.
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#15
You're thinking of a bodice it seems which is similar but unsupported. In the 19th century, brassieres began to be worn with underbust corsets. It should be said that even an underbust corset will provide a large degree of support to the bust. This is a picture of a typical overbust corset in the Victorian period
[Image: victorian_corset_or_bustier_great_vintag...ta_400.jpg]
Only fancy lace corsets were worn outside of a woman's blouse, and these were considerably more rare and expensive. Corsets were predominately an undergarment. Garters would also be attached to the bottom to suspend stockings--which are another unfortunate sartorial casualty, alas.
Yes, Satori, I am a young man.
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#16
(04-12-2011, 10:30 AM)verenaerin Wrote:Every woman should be armed with a good pair of Spanx. But that is a world different then a corset. Also, back in the day when women wore corsets they didn't wear... support above the waist. That is a hazzard, of fashion and modesty. I much rather have proper fitting modern undergarments then a corset.

Agreed! Espeically post-baby all my clothes look better with Spanx underneath. I only bother for special occasions though. I do have a corset thing I bought at a Renaissance Faire a few years back, but that is the only occasion I can think of that I'd wear one on purpose. It wasn't quite a real corset though. I think it was made by Moresca, though I don't remember exactly.
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#17
(04-12-2011, 01:10 PM)St. Drogo Wrote: It's a very gradual process, and it takes a long time. Ideally, a woman would be corseted with very mild constriction (1-2") from the age of 16 twenty three hours a day/ seven days a week and the constriction would be increased up to 1 inch a month until the desired waist circumference was achieved.

Exactly, it's like foot binding.  Women shouldn't do that either.  If one needs to wear a corset to improve posture, that's a different use.

Also, while you say fainting might be rare, I tend not to believe that.  I can certainly believe the cause is improper use, but when people are given an opportunity to change how they look, they overdo it.  I'm willing to bet an over-tightened corset was pretty common, especially among younger women in the middle class. At least as common as anorexia and bulimia are today.
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#18
God gave us something called "muscles" and a "skeleton".

Emulating the looking of a healthy body is quite vain. Altering the body solely so one can appear differently to others is also vain.

To get the figure that corsets were designed to give, all one needs to do is have the skeletal system which would support it (most people) instead of altering one's skeletal system for a cosmetic effect, and have the muscle tone and size to give the body the shape which is natural. Reducing excess adipose tissue is the only other step. We should not rely on external elements to give our bodies shape.

A person with an appealing body should cover it for modesty. A person without should not attempt to emulate one for immodesty.
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#19
Corsets.    :puke:

Wasp waists are for wasps, not humans!
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#20
I'd never want women to have to go back to wearing corsets all the time. Wear something confining to bed? Never! I can't even tolerate brassieres once the weather gets warm. But I'd like the option of a good corset sometimes, loosely laced, to keep my back straight. Small waists are nice, but not -- in my opinion -- the teeny weeny ones the Victorians and Edwardians seem to have fancied, judging from their fashion plates.
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