Lenten "Little Black Book" available @ NO parishes
#1
Hello all!
I haven't seen this book in several years, but I have heard that it is still around.

What can you all tell me about it, from a Traditional Catholic view?  I really know next to nothing about the book, but I am concerned because I have been hearing it quoted, and the quotes sound... dubious.
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#2
That's not a lot of detail on which to reply: there are an endless stream of little booklets of Lenten (and Advent, and etc.) devotions. Some are fine. Some are mediocre. Some are dreadful. Some have black covers. Who knows what's in the one to which you're referring.
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#3
(04-12-2011, 08:03 PM)PatienceAndLove Wrote: Hello all!
I haven't seen this book in several years, but I have heard that it is still around.

What can you all tell me about it, from a Traditional Catholic view?  I really know next to nothing about the book, but I am concerned because I have been hearing it quoted, and the quotes sound... dubious.
 

I have one.  It has quotes from the bible, with commentary for each day of Lent.  As a traditional Catholic I find it helpful.
  I don't know what quotes you have heard.  Maybe you can give some of them.
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#4
I've used those before and really benefited from this.  I'm assuming your referring to the Little Black Books that are published by the Catholic Diocese of Saginaw.

You can find information about it online, but I didn't know the rules here about putting links to other websites, so I refrained from linking to it. 

They have other books for Advent and other times of the Church year.
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#5
i love the little black book. My mother, who is almost 80, and hates everything "new", actually loves it too.

We should not be suspicious of things just because they are new. Take the good, toss out what you don't like.

They have a little white book for Easter too.
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#6
(04-13-2011, 03:00 PM)Loriveronica Wrote: I've used those before and really benefited from this.  I'm assuming your referring to the [b]Little Black Books that are published by the Catholic Diocese of Saginaw.[/b]

You can find information about it online, but I didn't know the rules here about putting links to other websites, so I refrained from linking to it. 

They have other books for Advent and other times of the Church year.

that is the one.

This is the quote I am thinking about, regarding Holy Communion:

"The cup has particular meaning.  In Gethsemane, Jesus prayed, "Father, if You are willing, take this cup away from me."  The cup of suffering wasn't taken away.  But by accepting it, Jesus found the path to life.

When I stand before the cup and say "Amen," I'm saying, "Lord, I accept, as You did, whatever sufferings cannot be taken away.  I trust, as You trusted, that God will somehow make this something good.  And I trust that if You are with me, I can do it."
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#7
Copyright 2010 Diocese of Saginaw

Catholics commonly speak of "changes" in the Mass after Vatican II.  The truth is that these changes were actually restorations of some of our oldest traditions.

The biggest change is our change in attitude about the mass and our role in it.  No longer can we talk as though the priest were "saying" the mass while we "attend."  The General Instruction of the Roman Missal says that in the Eucharistic Prayer the entire congregation joins itself to Christ in acknowledging the great things God has done and in offering the sacrifice.

Picture a college dorm room with music rooms in the basement.  Students can go to individual practice rooms with their trumpet or guitar and play away without affecting each other.  Compare that to orchestra members who bring their instruments to play the same song together.

That's the difference.

The introductory Rites of the Mass (from the entrance procession to the Gathering Prayer) help us become an "orchestra."  The purpose of these rites is so that the faithful coming together take the form of a community.

How do we "pray" this part of the mass?

By remembering that we're in this together.  The next time you are at Mass, focus for a few moments on the people who are gathered there.  Here we are, the Lord's own disciples in the year 2011, as diverse as Peter, Thomas, Mary Magdalene, as imperfect as they were, yet called by name, sharing "one Lord, one faith, one baptism."

Try it the next time at Mass.  It can be an eye-opening experience to be consciously aware of this diversity, yet our unity in faith.  Attitude changing, in fact.

This was the commentary of 3-13-11.  This is the "orchestra" I thought of.... :villagepeeps:
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#8
(04-13-2011, 05:26 PM)PatienceAndLove Wrote:
(04-13-2011, 03:00 PM)Loriveronica Wrote: I've used those before and really benefited from this.  I'm assuming your referring to the [b]Little Black Books that are published by the Catholic Diocese of Saginaw.[/b]

You can find information about it online, but I didn't know the rules here about putting links to other websites, so I refrained from linking to it. 

They have other books for Advent and other times of the Church year.

that is the one.

This is the quote I am thinking about, regarding Holy Communion:

"The cup has particular meaning.  In Gethsemane, Jesus prayed, "Father, if You are willing, take this cup away from me."  The cup of suffering wasn't taken away.  But by accepting it, Jesus found the path to life.

When I stand before the cup and say "Amen," I'm saying, "Lord, I accept, as You did, whatever sufferings cannot be taken away.  I trust, as You trusted, that God will somehow make this something good.  And I trust that if You are with me, I can do it."
Funny, I always thought when I responded "Amen" to "Blood of Christ", that it was an affirmation of my belief that the contents of the cup indeed is the "Blood of Christ"  It's also His Body, Soul, & Divinity.
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