Divine Mercy Sunday
#1
Hello,

Can anybody please help me with a question about the Novus Ordo Divine Mercy feast today?

My question is - how is going to confession today any different from going on any other day where a plenary indulgence is available?

The message seems to suggest that availing myself of the sacraments of confession and the eucharist today will result in a full (or perhaps 'fuller') remission of sin than is possible on any other day of the year.  Well, isn't full remission of sin what happens every time I go to confession?  What exactly then is novel about this message of mercy and why all this fuss?  Haven't we been receiving full remission of all sin and the associated temporal penalties every time we've obtained a plenary indulgence? 

My concern is that this devotion is beginning to make it sound like there is some sort of way toward remission of sin that can only be obtained once a year / doesn't require the sacraments (i.e. because of the emphasis on the divine mercy novena that culminates today, etc).

Any thoughts?  Not that it makes any difference, but I heard that Sister Faustina's works were once on the Index, although I guess that saints' messages haven't always been accepted ab initio by the Church.

Thanks very much.
Reply
#2
Not sure. It says "Low Sunday" on my calendar.
Reply
#3
(05-01-2011, 02:13 PM)username123 Wrote: Not sure. It says "Low Sunday" on my calendar.

Lol  :laughing:

My calendar from TAN Books has both - Low Sunday (Trad) and Divine Mercy Sunday (NO).

Reply
#4
Under ordinary circumstances, confession does not offer plenary indulgence.  Sins are forgiven, but the debt has not been fully paid.
Reply
#5
From EWTN's website (http://www.ewtn.com/devotionals/mercy/decree.htm)

Three conditions for the plenary indulgence

And so the Supreme Pontiff, motivated by an ardent desire to foster in Christians this devotion to Divine Mercy as much as possible in the hope of offering great spiritual fruit to the faithful, in the Audience granted on 13 June 2002, to those Responsible for the Apostolic Penitentiary, granted the following Indulgences:

A plenary indulgence, granted under the usual conditions (sacramental confession, Eucharistic communion and prayer for the intentions of Supreme Pontiff) to the faithful who, on the Second Sunday of Easter or Divine Mercy Sunday, in any church or chapel, in a spirit that is completely detached from the affection for a sin, even a venial sin, take part in the prayers and devotions held in honour of Divine Mercy, or who, in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament exposed or reserved in the tabernacle, recite the Our Father and the Creed, adding a devout prayer to the merciful Lord Jesus (e.g. Merciful Jesus, I trust in you!")

A partial indulgence, granted to the faithful who, at least with a contrite heart, pray to the merciful Lord Jesus a legitimately approved invocation.


A week after my Confirmation, I did participate in the Divine Mercy prayers at a Novus Ordo parish (this was before I understood the distinction between conservatives and traditionalists.)

My feeling is that all things being equal, a plenary indulgance is a big deal and a real treasure.  For various reasons I personally don't want much to do with Novus Ordo churches (they are valid, but I can't choose to forget Abel's sacrifice.)  

It probably won't help going into a church and being upset at what you see.  Traditionalist communities do offer this devotion and think this is a good thing.

Whatever we might think about St. Faustina's visions, what is the case is that the Pope did institute a plenary indulgence and we should want to make every use of a chance to minimize our time in Purgatory should be be judged so worthily.
Reply
#6
(05-01-2011, 02:36 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: Under ordinary circumstances, confession does not offer plenary indulgence.  Sins are forgiven, but the debt has not been fully paid.

Correct - thanks.  My question is therefore, why is this stuff any different from a day where a plenary is available and you go to confession, communicate, pray for the Pope's intentions and are free from all attachment from sin.  What particular extra sins are remitted today that can't be remitted on any other day?
Reply
#7
(05-01-2011, 02:43 PM)kingtheoden Wrote: From EWTN's website (http://www.ewtn.com/devotionals/mercy/decree.htm)

Three conditions for the plenary indulgence

And so the Supreme Pontiff, motivated by an ardent desire to foster in Christians this devotion to Divine Mercy as much as possible in the hope of offering great spiritual fruit to the faithful, in the Audience granted on 13 June 2002, to those Responsible for the Apostolic Penitentiary, granted the following Indulgences:

A plenary indulgence, granted under the usual conditions (sacramental confession, Eucharistic communion and prayer for the intentions of Supreme Pontiff) to the faithful who, on the Second Sunday of Easter or Divine Mercy Sunday, in any church or chapel, in a spirit that is completely detached from the affection for a sin, even a venial sin, take part in the prayers and devotions held in honour of Divine Mercy, or who, in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament exposed or reserved in the tabernacle, recite the Our Father and the Creed, adding a devout prayer to the merciful Lord Jesus (e.g. Merciful Jesus, I trust in you!")

A partial indulgence, granted to the faithful who, at least with a contrite heart, pray to the merciful Lord Jesus a legitimately approved invocation.


A week after my Confirmation, I did participate in the Divine Mercy prayers at a Novus Ordo parish (this was before I understood the distinction between conservatives and traditionalists.)

My feeling is that all things being equal, a plenary indulgance is a big deal and a real treasure.  For various reasons I personally don't want much to do with Novus Ordo churches (they are valid, but I can't choose to forget Abel's sacrifice.)  

It probably won't help going into a church and being upset at what you see.  Traditionalist communities do offer this devotion and think this is a good thing.

Whatever we might think about St. Faustina's visions, what is the case is that the Pope did institute a plenary indulgence and we should want to make every use of a chance to minimize our time in Purgatory should be be judged so worthily.

Agreed - I think the answer to my question then is that there is no difference between this day and any other on which a plenary is available?
Reply
#8
(05-01-2011, 03:52 PM)Pilgrim_here Wrote:
(05-01-2011, 02:36 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: Under ordinary circumstances, confession does not offer plenary indulgence.  Sins are forgiven, but the debt has not been fully paid.

Correct - thanks.  My question is therefore, why is this stuff any different from a day where a plenary is available and you go to confession, communicate, pray for the Pope's intentions and are free from all attachment from sin.  What particular extra sins are remitted today that can't be remitted on any other day?

None. It's a normal plenary.
Reply
#9
Thanks.
Reply
#10
This priest explains it well. Remission of sins on Divine Mercy Sunday is more than a plenary indulgence, and a lot easier ("divine mercy") to get, as total detachment from venial sin is not easy. Basically, a plenary indulgence isn't so easy to get, and less conditions have to be met this one day of the year to get the total removal of sins. The priest explains it better. :blush:

http://www.audiosancto.org/sermon/201204...Mercy.html
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)