Osama didn't need to convert says the Vatican
#1
The Vatican apparently agrees with the urgent need for dialog with and sensitivity for Islam/Muslims:

Blessed Pope John Paul’s legacy to dialogue and reconciliation

Vatican
5/3/11
http://www.radiovaticana.org/EN1/Articolo.asp?c=483793

Following increased tensions over the death of Osama Bin Laden, one of Blessed Pope John Paul’s closest advisors on interfaith issues examines the former pontiff’s commitment to dialogue with the Muslim world. Archbishop Michael Fitzgerald was ordained bishop by Pope John Paul in 1992 and worked closely with him as secretary and later president of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue. Today he serves as apostolic nuncio to Egypt and as Vatican representative to the Cairo based Arab League. He talks to Philippa Hitchen about his personal memories, about the ongoing work of building trust between peoples of different faiths and about Egypt’s role in the Middle East conflict….

"Right from (Pope John Paul's) first encyclical Redemptor Hominis he opens the perspective of relations with people of other religions, that the mission of the Church is to all people. That doesn't necessarily mean - according to the teachings of the Second Vatican Council - that all have to become Christians. No-one could accuse John Paul II of being an unfervant Christian, he was a missionary for the Church, but at the same time he had this great respect for people of other religions - and they returned that respect."

"I would hope that there will be a resumption of dialouge (with Al-Azhar)...I think there's a need for greater understanding, perhaps on both sides. Recently I met with Sheikh Al-Azhar but there wasn't any progess at that meeting. What I did say was that even if there is no dialogue with the Holy See, I would hope that dialogue could continue with Christians in Egypt, not only the Coptic Orthodox but also with the Catholics there."

"There are elements in Egyptian society that are in contact with Al-Qaeda - some of the leaders are Egyptians. I don't think the death of Bin Laden will end Al-Qaeda activities as they are more of a conglomeration of people rather than an organised movement. Let us hope there will not be other attacks, bombs and violence - the country depends heavily on tourism and if there is violence the tourists don't come."
Reply
#2
And from the US Bishops who are more concerned with scrutiny of Muslims...

US bishop concerned about ‘intense scrutiny’ of Muslims

Catholic World News
May 04, 2011

An auxiliary bishop of Baltimore has expressed concern about the treatment of Muslims in the United States.

“Our dialogue has taken on renewed urgency since we met last year,” said Bishop Denis Madden, co-chair of the Mid-Atlantic Catholic-Muslim Dialogue, which met in April on the topic of religious education. “Because of our past and present experience as an immigrant people, we Catholics are very sensitive to our Muslim brothers and sisters when they come under intense scrutiny by the mass media or government officials,” a likely reference to Rep. Peter King’s congressional hearings on radical Islam.


Source(s): Mid-Atlantic Catholic-Muslim Dialogue Discusses Principles of Religious Education, Examines Interreligious Programs (USCCB) http://www.usccb.org/comm/archives/2011/11-089.shtml

Reply
#3
And a comment from someone on AQ said which I wholeheartedly agree with is this...

The divine Thomas teaches that of all sins, those against the Faith are worst of all.

We are moving right through the bubble of diabolical disorientation and into the abyss of satanic stupidity.

Addendum: I am not accusing any one individual of deliberately, knowingly working hand in hand with ol' scratch, but there can be no doubt that we are passing through a time of unspeakable abnormality concerning the Faith and few indeed take seriously just how infinitely consequential these matters are.

Reply
#4
Pathetic...what the hell is the point of being Catholic if you're that ecumenical? Ridiculous.
Reply
#5
Proof again VII wasn't infallible!
Reply
#6
Here's what Vatican II teaches on this point:

7. This missionary activity derives its reason from the will of God, "who wishes all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth. For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, Himself a man, Jesus Christ, who gave Himself as a ransom for all" (1 Tim. 2:45), "neither is there salvation in any other" (Acts 4:12). Therefore, all must be converted to Him, made known by the Church's preaching, and all must be incorporated into Him by baptism and into the Church which is His body.

http://www.vatican.va/archive/hist_counc...es_en.html
Reply
#7
(05-05-2011, 10:35 AM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: Proof again VII wasn't infallible!

Or maybe it's proof that the article in the OP was misrepresenting the teaching of Vatican II.  There are plenty of liberal Catholics around who will state that VII taught things that it did not actually teach.  When somebody makes a claim like the one in that article, it needs to be verified.
Reply
#8
From the Title:

Quote: Blessed Pope John Paul’s legacy

That about sums it up.
Reply
#9
(05-05-2011, 12:26 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(05-05-2011, 10:35 AM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: Proof again VII wasn't infallible!

Or maybe it's proof that the article in the OP was misrepresenting the teaching of Vatican II.  There are plenty of liberal Catholics around who will state that VII taught things that it did not actually teach.  When somebody makes a claim like the one in that article, it needs to be verified.

Nevertheless, VII was erroneous and opened the door to a multitude of errors; even if the errors were not explicitly stated. The pastoral nature of that ecumenical council was perhaps in good form, but it ended up doing the exact opposite of what it was meant to do. Even Paul VI and JPII allude to the wrongs that resulted either directly or indirectly from Vatican II. I am still trying to figure out how to take that council. It is a thorn in my side and dragging me down.
Reply
#10
(05-05-2011, 12:37 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote:
(05-05-2011, 12:26 PM)JayneK Wrote: Or maybe it's proof that the article in the OP was misrepresenting the teaching of Vatican II.  There are plenty of liberal Catholics around who will state that VII taught things that it did not actually teach.  When somebody makes a claim like the one in that article, it needs to be verified.

Nevertheless, VII was erroneous and opened the door to a multitude of errors; even if the errors were not explicitly stated. The pastoral nature of that ecumenical council was perhaps in good form, but it ended up doing the exact opposite of what it was meant to do. Even Paul VI and JPII allude to the wrongs that resulted either directly or indirectly from Vatican II. I am still trying to figure out how to take that council. It is a thorn in my side and dragging me down.

I am not denying that there are genuine problems with Vatican II.  It is just that we need to be somewhat suspicious of any claims made about it and verify them for ourselves.  I often see people saying that VII taught things, but on investigation their claims are false.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)