Happy Solemnity of St. Joseph!
#11
(05-13-2011, 01:28 AM)aquinas138 Wrote:
(05-13-2011, 01:01 AM)Adam Wayne Wrote: By the way, today's Office was powerful to say the least. Glad I did not miss it. I'm starting to get the hang of things pretty well. Been praying Matins since late January, started to incorporate Compline soon after. Lauds I found beyond comprehension for quite awhile. But, I am getting the hang of it. But, today, I used the Common of the Feast  Antiphons for Lauds with Scheme 1 Psalms for Sunday. It seemed to make a lot more sense. But, I noticed that Lazslo's site, and the Breviary site run by the Sedes prayed Thursday Psalms with the one Alleluia Antiphon. How does one know when to use the Common and when to use the Scheme for the day of the week? Any tips you can share? Or is it a matter of personal preference?

The Sunday psalms are used on excepted feasts, otherwise you use the ferial psalter (basically).  Thursday was the feast of Ss. Nereus, Achilleus, Domitilla, and Pancras; commemoration of the octave at Lauds; Vespers was of I Vespers of St. Robert Bellarmine, commemorations of II Vespers of Ss. Nereus et al. and of the Octave.

For common octaves, such as this one, the office of days within the octave will use the ferial psalter every day, with the semidouble rite.  The lessons of the 1st nocturn with their responsories are from the season.  Which edition of the office are you using?
Thanks, aquinas138. I use the Benziger Brothers 1950 edition in English. Now for the Easter Octave, we were using Sunday Psalms for a week. I think this is where the confusion started for me. Not to mention the Triduum Offices.

But, when I go to look up the hymn for Lauds in the Common, sometimes I'm presented with Antiphons for the Common and told to pray Sunday Psalms with the Antiphons for the Common of the Feast. But, there is no direction in the Ordo. Yet, Divinum Officium will pull hymns, versicles and responses, and Little Chapters from the Common, yet they will use the Psalter for the day and the Antiphon Proper to the Season. This is my major source of cofusion. I basically have an English version of Divino Afflatu. But, maybe these are little changes that emerged. I really don't know. 

As I said before, or at least tried to impart, I thought the Antiphons for the Common and the Sunday Psalms were more in line with the tone of the feast of Ss. Nereus, Achilleus, Domitilla, and Pancras. But, I'm not challenging, I just want to pray it properly. In case you haven't figured it out, I'm getting quite a good dose of Sunday Psalms. And not necessarily a bad thing for a novice such as myself. Lots of mystery to unveil, and each time I read the same Psalm in a different Feast, more light comes my way. But, I do need to start hitting those weekday Psalms to start getting to know them as well as Sunday's. 
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#12
Thank you, Paul. I think I've got the Octave part down pretty well now thanks to you and aquinas138.

But, if you can look at my previous post directly above, perhaps you too can chime in and shed some light for me on the problem I have with Lauds for Feasts when I start to look into the Common for the Hymn.

I'm getting just comfortable and "knowledgeable" enough at this point to be really dangerous!

Any other veterans of the Divine Office who can help, will also be much appreciated.

This can be complicated stuff. I think it will take me a good year and to go through the entire Liturgical Cycle to really start to get a handle on it.
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#13
Basically, I would work with the assumption that for a given feast, you will first use anything that is proper, then take antiphons and psalms from the weekday, everything else from the common.  This covers the vast majority of feasts from greater doubles to simples. 

However, "excepted feasts" use the festal psalms (common or proper at Matins and Vespers, Sunday at the other hours).  Excepted feasts are all doubles (of whatever rank) of the Lord, Our Lady, the Angels, St. John the Baptist, St. Joseph, the Apostles and Evangelists, and all doubles of the I or II class, no matter the saint or mystery.

There are some "partially excepted feasts" which use the festal psalms at Lauds and Vespers only–you recognize these because they have proper antiphons assigned.

The reason the commons have antiphons and psalms, even though they are much less frequently used than the chapter, hymn, etc., is in case a particular feast is celebrated with a higher dignity in certain places, such as your parish's feast of title or the anniversary of the dedication of the cathedral church (both doubles of the I class with a common octave).  Also, it might happen that a feast had been added to the calendar, but you were not in possession of the proper office; thus you would use the common in its stead.  Originally, of course, the entire common was used for feasts–the festal office replaced the entire ferial office, psalter and all.
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#14
Also, yes I think a year is about right for mastering the Divino Afflatu rubrics.  You'll still hit the occasional snag, particularly if you aren't consulting an Ordo, but there are always people here willing to help, and Paul in particular is very helpful with questions about the office. 

Fortunately God judges us more on our intentions and effort than our execution!
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#15
Thanks, aquinas138! That has cleared up much.
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#16
First, yes, prayer to St. Joseph works. He is the man. He is the father of God, after all. (Now all you with brains know I mean no heresy here.)
Second, I'm not gonna lie, I'm a trad, but the '62 more simpler office  is very easy. I love it. I think the Divino Afflatu rubrics would have discouraged me from the Office.

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#17
(05-14-2011, 12:25 AM)randomtradguy Wrote: First, yes, prayer to St. Joseph works. He is the man. He is the father of God, after all. (Now all you with brains know I mean no heresy here.)
Second, I'm not gonna lie, I'm a trad, but the '62 more simpler office  is very easy. I love it. I think the Divino Afflatu rubrics would have discouraged me from the Office.

Absolutely, that's why I think, in my case, this Octave and Solemnity was important. St. Joseph is not talked about enough IMHO. And in reading Gueranger's Liturgical Year, he makes quite a case why he is the Saint of the late 19th and 20th Century and in the present. Like you said, he is the protector of the Child Jesus and by default the Church. But, we don't here that enough. Or should I just talk in the 1st person and say, "I don't here that enough". He also makes the case that certain devotions and Feasts are added over the centuries when the time is right. By Divine intervention. He also states that St. Joseph was not talked about much at all in early Church history. But, his time was to come and it is now!

St. Teresa of Avila first proposed greater devotion to St. Joseph and this was communicated to her and the Sisters at Mt. Carmel by the Holy Ghost through meditation and prayer to the Blessed Virgin. That's the best this hack can do in explaining it at the moment. Better to read from the master himself, Gueranger.

By the way, which Breviary do you use that is from '62? Is it Collegville or a pure Latin Breviary?
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#18
(05-13-2011, 11:20 PM)Adam Wayne Wrote: Thanks, aquinas138. I use the Benziger Brothers 1950 edition in English. Now for the Easter Octave, we were using Sunday Psalms for a week. I think this is where the confusion started for me. Not to mention the Triduum Offices.

But, when I go to look up the hymn for Lauds in the Common, sometimes I'm presented with Antiphons for the Common and told to pray Sunday Psalms with the Antiphons for the Common of the Feast. But, there is no direction in the Ordo. Yet, Divinum Officium will pull hymns, versicles and responses, and Little Chapters from the Common, yet they will use the Psalter for the day and the Antiphon Proper to the Season. This is my major source of cofusion. I basically have an English version of Divino Afflatu. But, maybe these are little changes that emerged. I really don't know. 

As I said before, or at least tried to impart, I thought the Antiphons for the Common and the Sunday Psalms were more in line with the tone of the feast of Ss. Nereus, Achilleus, Domitilla, and Pancras. But, I'm not challenging, I just want to pray it properly. In case you haven't figured it out, I'm getting quite a good dose of Sunday Psalms. And not necessarily a bad thing for a novice such as myself. Lots of mystery to unveil, and each time I read the same Psalm in a different Feast, more light comes my way. But, I do need to start hitting those weekday Psalms to start getting to know them as well as Sunday's. 

As aquinas138 mentioned, the ferial psalter is generally used for Feasts, except for the "excepted Feasts", all Doubles of the I or II class, and for a few Feasts at both Vespers, sometimes Matins, and Lauds (St. Lucy, St. Agnes, St. Agatha, Ss. John and Paul, St. Martin, St. Cecilia, St. Clement), where proper Antiphons are given. This was the main reform with Divino Afflatu. Before 1911, everything was from the Common on Feasts, which meant that the ferial Psalms were rarely said, so with the addition of so many Feasts to the calendar, some Psalms were only said a few times a year.

And if you thought the Sunday Psalms throughout the Easter Octave was fun, just wait until Pentecost and the Octaves of Corpus Christi and the Sacred Heart. ;D
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#19
One other note about Hymns (for the Divino Afflatu rubrics): since it's Eastertide, all Hymns at the Little Hours and Compline, and those of the same meter at the other Hours, have the last verse changed to the one used during Eastertide ("Deo Patri sit glória / Et Fílio, qui a mórtuis / Surréxit, ac Paráclito / In sempitérna sæcula. Amen."). A few Hymns are exceptions to this, but they'll have a note saying the Conclusion is never to be changed.
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#20
(05-14-2011, 12:45 AM)Adam Wayne Wrote: st through meditation and prayer to the Blessed Virgin. That's the best this hack can do in explaining it at the moment. Better to read from the master himself, Gueranger.

By the way, which Breviary do you use that is from '62? Is it Collegville or a pure Latin Breviary?

Sorry, I forgot about this thread.
Indeed, S. Joseph's time is NOW. I urge all fishies to pray to Joseph; I have a chaplet of S. Joseph but due to college I haven't praying the Rosary/chaplet/office as much recently.
I use the Diurnale from churchlatin.com which I bought from a man on here who works for them or owns the company but whatever your position is sir, thanks, if you're reading this.
Matins isn't really my thing so I bought the diurnale
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