Why was cremation not allowed pre-vatican II?
#31
(05-14-2011, 01:16 AM)DrBombay Wrote: Maybe some people don't want their bodies to liquifiey and leak out of their casket.

http://www.funerals-ripoffs.org/-A11bLw1.htm

Just a thought. 

Yeah, that's kind of a turn-off, especially when you've shelled out so much for the embalming, casket, etc.

If people are more relaxed at services where the body has been cremated, as The Curt Jester said, it could be because people know bodies decompose and they don't like thinking about what may be going on in that casket already, but of course they think about it, anyway.  If there's an urn with ashes present instead, everyone knows nothing gross is going on in the urn.  Ashes just sit there.

Years ago, I saw a show on tv discussing funerals and one funeral director who ran a maverick funeral home, helping people get really cheap funerals, said to the other funeral directors on the show, "You know that the first person who gets to work in the morning at any funeral home checks all the bodies to see if any are going bad.  Will any of you deny that?"  Nobody denied it. 

Now, considering that most people are buried within three days after death, that certainly suggests that embalming doesn't do a heck of a lot of good, if bodies can go bad before burial.  I presume they take bodies back in the back room and pump in more embalming fluid if they start going bad. 

So embalming slows the decomp down but unless you're one of the rare incorruptibles, your body will eventually decompose into nothing recognizable as human remains.  Cremation just speeds up that process of dust to dust, ashes to ashes. 

It's not as if God will be faced with an easy task of restoring the bodies of those who were buried and an impossible task with those who were cremated.  Most bodies will be nothing but atoms, maybe molecules.  Fortunately, being God, He will be able to restore everyone.



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#32
(05-14-2011, 06:36 AM)Revixit Wrote:
(05-14-2011, 01:16 AM)DrBombay Wrote: Maybe some people don't want their bodies to liquifiey and leak out of their casket.

http://www.funerals-ripoffs.org/-A11bLw1.htm

Just a thought. 

Yeah, that's kind of a turn-off, especially when you've shelled out so much for the embalming, casket, etc.

If people are more relaxed at services where the body has been cremated, as The Curt Jester said, it could be because people know bodies decompose and they don't like thinking about what may be going on in that casket already, but of course they think about it, anyway.  If there's an urn with ashes present instead, everyone knows nothing gross is going on in the urn.  Ashes just sit there.

Years ago, I saw a show on tv discussing funerals and one funeral director who ran a maverick funeral home, helping people get really cheap funerals, said to the other funeral directors on the show, "You know that the first person who gets to work in the morning at any funeral home checks all the bodies to see if any are going bad.  Will any of you deny that?"  Nobody denied it. 

Now, considering that most people are buried within three days after death, that certainly suggests that embalming doesn't do a heck of a lot of good, if bodies can go bad before burial.  I presume they take bodies back in the back room and pump in more embalming fluid if they start going bad. 

So embalming slows the decomp down but unless you're one of the rare incorruptibles, your body will eventually decompose into nothing recognizable as human remains.  Cremation just speeds up that process of dust to dust, ashes to ashes. 

It's not as if God will be faced with an easy task of restoring the bodies of those who were buried and an impossible task with those who were cremated.  Most bodies will be nothing but atoms, maybe molecules.  Fortunately, being God, He will be able to restore everyone.
thats funny there seems to be such a thing as skeletal remains
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#33
"I am not a proponent of cremation per se but there are some things people might want to consider in this regard.  The typical U.S. funeral in 2009 averaged $6,560 before cemetery costs http://www.nfda.org/media-center/statisticsreports.html.  Cemetery costs for traditional burial of a casket may run $1,000 for a space, $400 - $600 for a basic liner (in lieu of a vault), $500 - $800 for opening and closing costs, $300 - $500 for a basic flat stone marker.  Most people aren’t necessarily prudent enough to plan ahead, and many people don’t have a spare $10k sitting around."

Cremation is almost as expensive from what I've heard.

It doesn't seem right to burn a loved one's body somehow. I couldn't get myself to damage my sister's body in that way. I think simple people without means would just put it into the ground as lovingly as possible and keep a personal marker for it on their own property. This seems more natural and Godly.

I remember this Ethiopian Orthodox colleague of mine from school who told me his country won't do it because they think it prevents the body from being raised again on Judgement Day!  :o That seems a bit extreme to say the least. I've never heard this before. 

I'm not saying the other side doesn't have good arguments though.
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