new Anglican use parish in Baltimore
#11
(05-26-2011, 06:53 PM)CrusaderKing Wrote: It's important to understand the Episcopal Church in America when it comes to these (and similar) matters, and I think HK and Jovan will back me up with this.

In America, many Episcopalian Churches are propped up with what is called "old money," that is, money from families that have been in America for 200-300 years. This is usually the only thing that keeps them going as there are few Episcopalians in The US. In fact, there are more Catholics in New York City than there are Episcopalians in America.

The Episcopalians have basically become a real estate holding company; sort of like the Jesuits.

You're right. When I was a member there were over 3,000,000 of them. They're now down to just over 2 million.
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#12
Melkite, in the meantime, aren't there some decent TLM options in Baltimore? I lived there for years, and it seems to me that St. Alphonsus, at a minimum, had a regular, archdiocese-approved TLM long before the Motu Proprio was even thought of. I would think other TLMs are being offered now. Failing that, however, there are definitely parishes in Baltimore that do the NO as reverently as it can be done. St. Ignatius, where I converted, is probably still an example. I recall Sts. Philip and James in Charles Village as another.

Mind you, as a former Episcopalian without any local TLM options but a Traditional Anglican parish a few hundred feet from my doorstep, I often find myself hoping that that particular parish will swim the Tiber, but if I were in Baltimore, I doubt my thoughts would quite so readily incline that way. I'm just looking forward to the revised NO that's coming out during Advent. The revision is probably about as close to Tradition as I'm going to be able to get for the foreseeable future. My local bishop seems like a very good man, but I don't get the impression he's any too eager to promote the TLM.
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#13
(05-28-2011, 02:50 AM)WilfredLeblanc Wrote: Melkite, in the meantime, aren't there some decent TLM options in Baltimore? I lived there for years, and it seems to me that St. Alphonsus, at a minimum, had a regular, archdiocese-approved TLM long before the Motu Proprio was even thought of. I would think other TLMs are being offered now. Failing that, however, there are definitely parishes in Baltimore that do the NO as reverently as it can be done. St. Ignatius, where I converted, is probably still an example. I recall Sts. Philip and James in Charles Village as another.

Mind you, as a former Episcopalian without any local TLM options but a Traditional Anglican parish a few hundred feet from my doorstep, I often find myself hoping that that particular parish will swim the Tiber, but if I were in Baltimore, I doubt my thoughts would quite so readily incline that way. I'm just looking forward to the revised NO that's coming out during Advent. The revision is probably about as close to Tradition as I'm going to be able to get for the foreseeable future. My local bishop seems like a very good man, but I don't get the impression he's any too eager to promote the TLM.

I have been to the tlm at st. Alphonsus once many years ago.  I'm definitely eastern and that won't be changing any time soon, so I'm not looking for a parish to go to in the baltimore area.  But my family is episcopalian so I am just interested in this to have somewhere to visit from time to time that would remind me of that, and my recently deceased grandmother.  She had mentioned thinking about becoming Catholic, but she was also a proud Anglican.  If this had happened 5 or 10 years ago, she may have become Catholic for it.
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#14
(05-26-2011, 06:53 PM)CrusaderKing Wrote: In America, many Episcopalian Churches are propped up with what is called "old money," that is, money from families that have been in America for 200-300 years. This is usually the only thing that keeps them going as there are few Episcopalians in The US. In fact, there are more Catholics in New York City than there are Episcopalians in America.

Indeed, the property that the Episcopal Church survives on was seeded by families of the sort you refer to, but those families rarely have much money (or go to church regularly) anymore, and such congregants as the church has these days is quite varied in its complexion. And where the Episcopal Church used to be aptly described as "the Republican Party at prayer," one would have to define its political bent now quite differently

Sad to say, perhaps, but it never bothered me--to the point of making me want to leave--that the Episcopal Church seemed like a tribal, WASP club as much as it did an expression of faith. But when it became indubitable that the church had been hijacked by the gay rights and feminist movements and was going, henceforth, to be chiefly a platform for them, I was done. I am not altogether deaf to all elements of those secular agendas, but their very aggressive proponents seemed pretty deaf to the notion that a church should have more elevated priorities, and everyone else was pretty impotent to do anything about it.

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#15
(05-28-2011, 03:37 PM)WilfredLeblanc Wrote: And where the Episcopal Church used to be aptly described as "the Republican Party at prayer," one would have to define its political bent now quite differently

Not really, the Republican Party used to be a pretty liberal party (especially in the northeast) before it began tilt right way with the 1960s.  Other than being a bit more business friendly than the Democrats, there wasn't much conservatism in the Republican Party from 1932 to 1964. 
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#16
(05-29-2011, 12:01 AM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(05-28-2011, 03:37 PM)WilfredLeblanc Wrote: And where the Episcopal Church used to be aptly described as "the Republican Party at prayer," one would have to define its political bent now quite differently

Not really, the Republican Party used to be a pretty liberal party (especially in the northeast) before it began tilt right way with the 1960s.  Other than being a bit more business friendly than the Democrats, there wasn't much conservatism in the Republican Party from 1932 to 1964. 

I'm hard pressed to identify a moment when gay rights and feminism were part of the GOP agenda, but perhaps you can illuminate a gap in my learning.
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