Poll: Which country has the strongest Trad movement.
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Tradition
#11
I am learning French now.

Any good sites or sermons in French aside from the obvious SSPX sites?  ;D
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#12
(05-29-2011, 07:29 AM)karyn_anne Wrote: I am learning French now.

Any good sites or sermons in French aside from the obvious SSPX sites?  ;D

The French wikipedia pages can be helpful. It is normally written in a way which would be good for those learning.
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#13
(05-29-2011, 07:37 AM)Rosarium Wrote:
(05-29-2011, 07:29 AM)karyn_anne Wrote: I am learning French now.

Any good sites or sermons in French aside from the obvious SSPX sites?  ;D

The French wikipedia pages can be helpful. It is normally written in a way which would be good for those learning.

Very true. As a foreign language teacher I would recommend children's literature, especially poetry. Preferably with English translations. And FWIW, I would never, ever discount grammar. My students love the grammar hammar I bring out. Thor'd be jealous.
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#14
(05-29-2011, 10:49 AM)Heinrich Wrote:
(05-29-2011, 07:37 AM)Rosarium Wrote:
(05-29-2011, 07:29 AM)karyn_anne Wrote: I am learning French now.

Any good sites or sermons in French aside from the obvious SSPX sites?  ;D

The French wikipedia pages can be helpful. It is normally written in a way which would be good for those learning.

Very true. As a foreign language teacher I would recommend children's literature, especially poetry. Preferably with English translations. And FWIW, I would never, ever discount grammar. My students love the grammar hammar I bring out. Thor'd be jealous.



Do you have any knowledge or opinion on the online courses or the software packages like Rosetta Stone or Pimsleur? 
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#15
Hey, Gerard. I know the two programs, but I have not used either. Many homeschoolers use the Rosetta Stone school editions, but again, I can't vouch for how effective they are at teaching. Without getting into any jargon or argot on language learning, I still feel that having a strict grammar translation method with direct instruction by a native speaker or fluent speaker is the best way for an adult to learn another language(if they are not in the native speakers' country).  This is for ages 10 and up. With 10 yos and younger, a total immersion approach can be used, with varying effectiveness the younger one is due to linguistic areas of the brain being in different formation. We have the homeschool edition of Rosetta Stone French. Never even broken it out yet. I have also the FSI courses. Link here. Good stuff, free of charge.

http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php
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#16
The most efficient way to learn French (like any other language) is to study grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and literature. Rote memorization is the key. Start praying your rosary in French since the cadence will be familiar. Blackwell's reference grammar, Précis de Grammaire Française, and novels by Balzac will get you well on the way to proficiency. Watch lots of old French films too.

ETA: Both Archbishop Lefebvre and Bishop Williamson have a number of good sermons in French. They both enunciate very clearly and have a rhythm that I think is easy to follow for someone just learning French. I particularly recommend Bishop Williamson's ordination sermon on Akita.
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