A man's answer about culture/ethnicity turns into attack on Church?
#1
I was on Vox Day's website, discussing a topic that we don't typically discuss here.  Actually, I was asking a question.  My intention was to see if Vox or his readers believe that cultural similarities transcend ethnic and racial differences in a marriage, and if this is a good thing for society as a whole.  I'll leave it at that.

In any event, I got a response from a guy.  Instead of answering my question, he seemed to go on a tirade against Catholicism.  I want to share this man's reaction to what I asked, and see if ya'll can make sense of it, and what to think about it.  I have some opinions, but I want to hear yours first.

The hyperlink to the original Vox Day blog entry: http://voxday.blogspot.com/2011/05/mailv...black.html

The question:

Laramie Hirsch: 5/28/11 1:57 PM:
I fear this thread of conversation is dying out. I'll try again, though.

What about interracial marriages and families that are brought together through religion? For example, what about a white male and an Asian female who share the Catholic religion? Would it not be arguable that their culture is almost the same, since their core philosophy is the same?

And if it is Christianity that ties the two and binds them, do you think that this relationship would be contributing to society, rather than it be a denigrating factor?

Very eager to hear your opinion on this.

-L.H.


First: there seems to be confusion between what is a Christian and what is a member of a denomination. The two may overlap yet they are not the same thing. One is dealing directly with God the Father and the Son; the other is maintaining appearances or doesn't have a relationship: does not truly believe that he is a sinner and needs to repent and have his sins removed by Jesus' blood.

The Christian is held responsible for the doctrine he holds; he is also held responsible for what doctrines and their preachers he supports. Unfortunately this can be a late realization. Christians must learn to recognize false doctrines and leave the church, even the denomination, if those doctrines are dominant: if he stays, he falls under the same judgment as those who promote the falsehood. Yet the Christian is not a theologian and does not need to be able to argue a truth to be correct in his assessment - that is not going go over well amongst the intellectuals here.

But getting back to your original question: Roman Catholicism is a denomination within Christendom; as it has migrated across the globe it has taken the idols of the new cultures and made them elements of the Roman tradition: this is Babylon. Two members of this sect from different cultures can be considered to be worshiping different idols - even under the same name. If one spouse were to become an actual Christian, there will be growing conflict.

One more: Christianity is not passed on to children by birth; the habits of tradition are. To be a Christian, one must be born again into the spiritual relationship with God.
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#2
It's just standard Protestant reasoning.

I don't see anything special there.
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#3
(05-28-2011, 06:50 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: It's just standard Protestant reasoning.

I don't see anything special there.

I found him difficult to follow.  His reasoning seems muddled and mistaken.
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#4
(05-28-2011, 07:00 PM)LaramieHirsch Wrote:
(05-28-2011, 06:50 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: It's just standard Protestant reasoning.

I don't see anything special there.

I found him difficult to follow.  His reasoning seems muddled and mistaken.

Hence "standard Protestant reasoning."
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#5
I agree with Vetus.  Nothing new there.

However, the problem, of course, is obvious to anyone who can reason:  What is the definition of the word "Christian"?  Because the Bible contains no such definition, the Protestant can only propose his own definition of that word.  But his definition is merely a manmade oral tradition that he cannot find in Sacred Scripture; thus, he is contradicting his belief in Sola Scriptura by holding to his definition of the word "Christian."

To test this, one need merely ask:  Is infant baptism a "Christian" practice?  If it is not, that means the majority of people who believe/d in Sola Scriptura (Anglicans plus Lutherans plus a few others) engage in non-Christian practices, number one; and number two, those people don't understand "Sola Scriptura." 

Very problematic indeed, since Sola Scriptura comes from the Lutherans to begin with.
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#6
Vox has done some decent work..his book attacking the irrational thought process' of today's leading Atheist "thinkers" is useful.
His blog  followers though appear to be Austrian drones and WASPs to boot for the most part.

I remember one posting he did blaming the demise of the US,not on the corporate/zionist/military industrial uber powers that now wag the US Dog, but rather the generations of hard working and oppressed immigrants from Europe (particularly from RC nations) post WW1 and 2...go figure   ::)
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#7
(05-28-2011, 07:15 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote: Vox has done some decent work..his book attacking the irrational thought process' of today's leading Atheist "thinkers" is useful.
His blog  followers though appear to be Austrian drones and WASPs to boot for the most part.

I remember one posting he did blaming the demise of the US,not on the corporate/zionist/military industrial uber powers that now wag the US Dog, but rather the generations of hard working and oppressed immigrants from Europe (particularly from RC nations) post WW1 and 2...go figure   ::)

Interesting.
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#8
(05-28-2011, 06:45 PM)LaramieHirsch Wrote: I was on Vox Day's website, discussing a topic that we don't typically discuss here.  Actually, I was asking a question.  My intention was to see if Vox or his readers believe that cultural similarities transcend ethnic and racial differences in a marriage, and if this is a good thing for society as a whole.  I'll leave it at that.

In any event, I got a response from a guy.  Instead of answering my question, he seemed to go on a tirade against Catholicism.  I want to share this man's reaction to what I asked, and see if ya'll can make sense of it, and what to think about it.  I have some opinions, but I want to hear yours first.

The hyperlink to the original Vox Day blog entry: http://voxday.blogspot.com/2011/05/mailv...black.html

The question:

Laramie Hirsch: 5/28/11 1:57 PM:
I fear this thread of conversation is dying out. I'll try again, though.

What about interracial marriages and families that are brought together through religion? For example, what about a white male and an Asian female who share the Catholic religion? Would it not be arguable that their culture is almost the same, since their core philosophy is the same?

And if it is Christianity that ties the two and binds them, do you think that this relationship would be contributing to society, rather than it be a denigrating factor?

Very eager to hear your opinion on this.

-L.H.


The Christian is held responsible for the doctrine he holds; he is also held responsible for what doctrines and their preachers he supports. Unfortunately this can be a late realization. Christians must learn to recognize false doctrines and leave the church, even the denomination, if those doctrines are dominant: if he stays, he falls under the same judgment as those who promote the falsehood. Yet the Christian is not a theologian and does not need to be able to argue a truth to be correct in his assessment - that is not going go over well amongst the intellectuals here.

But getting back to your original question: Roman Catholicism is a denomination within Christendom; as it has migrated across the globe it has taken the idols of the new cultures and made them elements of the Roman tradition: this is Babylon. Two members of this sect from different cultures can be considered to be worshiping different idols - even under the same name. If one spouse were to become an actual Christian, there will be growing conflict.

One more: Christianity is not passed on to children by birth; the habits of tradition are. To be a Christian, one must be born again into the spiritual relationship with God.

So where does his authority come from to recognize "false doctrine" and make that judgement based upon Sola Scriptura? How does he know that HIS interpretation of Scripture is any more right or correct than any other of the some 30,000 different Protestant denominations each claiming the truth in their contradictory doctrines?
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#9
[quote='Thomas58' pid='776564' dateline='1306625839']
Quote:So where does his authority come from to recognize "false doctrine" and make that judgement based upon Sola Scriptura? How does he know that HIS interpretation of Scripture is any more right or correct than any other of the some 30,000 different Protestant denominations each claiming the truth in their contradictory doctrines?

Oh, that's an easy one!  The Holy Ghost guides him directly into an understanding of the Bible.  Anyone who doesn't agree with his interpretation is obviously not guided by the Holy Ghost. 
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#10
(05-28-2011, 07:01 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(05-28-2011, 07:00 PM)LaramieHirsch Wrote:
(05-28-2011, 06:50 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: It's just standard Protestant reasoning.

I don't see anything special there.

I found him difficult to follow.  His reasoning seems muddled and mistaken.

Hence "standard Protestant reasoning."

+1
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