Malta says 'Yes' to legalizing divorce
#11
Guess I'm putting off moving to Malta.
Reply
#12
At the risk of being imprudent and not :safe: I’ll offer some observations.

First, from the news story from the CBC in the first post:
Quote: The Catholic Church does not permit divorce but does allow annulments.

The Church does allow civil divorce for grave and necessary reasons.  In doing so She still defends and upholds the sacramental bond of the marriage, and the two parties are not free to remarry.

I lived in Colombia from November 1973 until February 1976 (during my Peace Corps service).  In the national elections in April of 1974 a key issue was the legalization of divorce.  Predictable “liberals, radicals, lefties, free masons, commies, and their ilk” were in favor of this, “conservatives, reactionaries, troglodytes, rightists, opponents of democratic republics, and their ilk” were opposed.  As far as I could tell both the general public and the Church had mixed emotions on the topic.  With the election of Alfonso López Michelsen (1974–1978) a provision for civil marriage was made (which, for all practical purposes did not exist in Colombia at the time; even Protestant marriages were a difficult affair) which could be dissolved by a civil divorce.  An amendment of the Constitution in 1991 allowed for decrees of civil divorce for marriages performed by the Church.

I could certainly understand the emotion surrounding the issue, and the sincere feeling of some thoughtful people (not the “reactionaries, troglodytes, rightists, opponents of democratic republics, and their ilk”) that this would represent one more blow to the sanctity of marriage and the family.  However, as is often the case in this messy world of ours, and not just speaking of current times, but of how it has always been since the fall, there are a multitude of issues involved.

In Colombia at that time, once a woman married, there were many things she could not do without her husband’s consent (before she married there were often many things she couldn’t do without her father’s consent).  For instance, she couldn’t’ open a bank account, sign a lease or buy a house, obtain a loan for a car, enroll children in school, etc.  Sometimes urgent medical care for herself or the children required the consent of the husband and father.  Some employers would not hire a woman without the consent of the husband.

Ideally, of course, the decisions and actions annunciated above would be mutually agreed upon by a married couple.  The problem is not all men are responsible, honorable, faithful, supporting, and loving husbands (just in case not everyone here is aware of that).  We all wish it were different, but such is life in a fallen world.  So, a wife and mother, with children to care for, who was abandoned by the “husband and father” was in a bit of a fix.  At that time in Colombia she couldn’t legally, or only with great difficulty (and often only with the intervention of her father, IF he will alive and IF he were responsible) open a bank account, enroll the children in at least some schools, procure a new place to live if needed, find a job to support the family, get medical care, etc., unless she could track down the “husband and father” to sign papers at every turn (assuming she could find him and he were sober enough to do so).

I certainly could conceive of some solutions to this issue (that were compatible with a sensus catholicus) other than the wholesale legalization of divorce, but it seemed that those opposed to legalizing divorce were opposed to those concepts also.

I don’t know what the situation is in Malta, or how it compares to Colombia when I lived there, but one does have to deal with the realities of life, and one certainly has to consider the needs of children, in particular.
Reply
#13
The world is wallowing in immorality, this is another attack against God's rule, don't forget God knows who voted for divorce and will handle them on judgement day.
Reply
#14
(05-29-2011, 06:55 PM)James02 Wrote: Where is the Pope?  Who has been excommunicated?  This is a Catholic country.

Until the Lord's PRIME minister starts doing his duty, we will only degrade further.

If this were Paul VI or JPII, they'd be busy opposing Abp. Lefebvre and encouraged heresy and apostasy.

Where Benedict is, I don't know. 
Reply
#15
So that leaves the Vatican, East Timor and the Philippines, which have Catholics as a majority, with no divorce laws.  But I take it back...the Philippines is going to debate passing a divorce law as soon as the RH law is resolved, which will in all probability considering the secular humanist mentality that has influenced the "intellectuals" here..  The Philipppines cannot really call itself a Catholic country anymore.  That's a whole new article I am writing about. 
Reply
#16
(06-01-2011, 01:29 AM)Vincentius Wrote: So that leaves the Vatican, East Timor and the Philippines, which have Catholics as a majority, with no divorce laws.   But I take it back...the Philippines is going to debate passing a divorce law as soon as the RH law is resolved, which will in all probability considering the secular humanist mentality that has influenced the "intellectuals" here..  The Philipppines cannot really call itself a Catholic country anymore.  That's a whole new article I am writing about. 

Very sad, really. From my observations, it is just a "cultural" thing, and no longer an integral part of life.
Reply
#17
(05-29-2011, 09:46 PM)moneil Wrote:
Quote: The Catholic Church does not permit divorce but does allow annulments.

The Church does allow civil divorce for grave and necessary reasons.  In doing so She still defends and upholds the sacramental bond of the marriage, and the two parties are not free to remarry.

Divorce is the dissolution of the marriage bond. It is thus a farce and utterly despicable.

What we should say is this: the Church allows married couples to separate. In some cases, in order to settle things such a custody, the Church tolerates that a couple go through the civil legal process of "divorce."

Divorce implies remarriage. That is because divorce purports to dissolve an existing marriage bond, and so supposedly leaves the spouses, now ex-spouses, free to marry. So not only is divorce a big lie, it is a big lie that leads to sin. Those who strongly desire to live according to God's commandments will not remarry, but the majority of people, who are weak, will: who hasn't heard of people who are divorced and remarried and yet go to Church regularly, weekly even, and sometimes even dare to receive Communion? They see nothing wrong with what they are doing. They are, after all, legally married to the person they live with. In reality, they are separated from their spouse and living in adultery, but the illusion of divorce obscures this fact.

Granting divorce is never good policy.

This is sad news for Malta, but nobody should be surprised.
Reply
#18
(06-01-2011, 03:41 PM)m.PR Wrote:
(05-29-2011, 09:46 PM)moneil Wrote:
Quote: The Catholic Church does not permit divorce but does allow annulments.

The Church does allow civil divorce for grave and necessary reasons.  In doing so She still defends and upholds the sacramental bond of the marriage, and the two parties are not free to remarry.

Divorce is the dissolution of the marriage bond. It is thus a farce and utterly despicable.

The Church allows married couples to separate. In some cases, in order to settle things such a custody, the Church tolerates that a couple go through the civil legal process of "divorce."

Divorce implies remarriage. That is because divorce purports to dissolve an existing marriage bond, and so supposedly leaves the spouses, now ex-spouses, free to marry. So not only is divorce a big lie, it is a big lie that leads to sin. Those who strongly desire to live according to God's commandments will not remarry, but the majority of people, who are weak, will: who hasn't heard of people who are divorced and remarried and yet go to Church regularly, weekly even, and sometimes even dare to receive Communion? They see nothing wrong with what they are doing. They are, after all, legally married to the person they live with. In reality, they are separated from their spouse and living in adultery, but the illusion of divorce obscures this fact.

Granting divorce is never good policy.

This is sad news for Malta, but nobody should be surprised.

Exactly. And since Malta is still a constitutionally Catholic country (hah...) this will most likely happen. It is disgusting. Hopefully priests will refuse communion to such people, though I doubt it (I don't think they refuse it to cohabiting persons, though I'm not sure how they would know). Legal divorce gives social respectability to sin.
Reply
#19
Another sad day for Christendom.

Jean Parisot de La Vallette pray for Malta!
Reply
#20
Moneil, your post on Colombia was pretty interesting, but I doubt it has anything to do with Malta's situation. 

Besides, if women face hardships because they need father's or husband's consent for things including even basic medical care or employment isn't the obvious solution .... to change the law so that they don't need consent?

Am I missing something?
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)