Father Stravinskas Dismisses Homeschooling
#21
(05-31-2011, 05:27 AM)Scipio_a Wrote: Children are like their parents....if the parents are dorks so are the kids usually....so if the parents are socially challenges...the kids often are....putting them in an institution where they will be targets and have their poor social skills reinforced is not a good solution.

So, your parents were borderline illiterate and unable to express themselves in writing?
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#22
(05-30-2011, 11:41 PM)Fr.Deacon S Wrote: I would say that catholic schools or a good private school would be preferable. I hate to say it but most children i have met who have been homeschooled are socially mal formed and have difficulty later on in life because of it.
Where in scripture does it say, "Thou shalt not be timid?"

I'd rather have a socially mal-formed child that goes to heaven than a social master player who goes to hell.

I am really dismayed at many of the responses on this thread, as if social and societal success is far more important to our children than their Catholic formation and eternal salvation. This is a trad Catholic forum?!?

(And if you ever met my children and their homeschooled peers, it would put to rest the BS being spouted on this thread and by Fr. Stravinskas.)

"Home schooling in the United States is the necessary concomitant of a culture in which the Church is being opposed on every level of her existence and, as a consequence, given the widespread secularization in our country, home schooling is not only valuable or useful but it is absolutely necessary for the survival of the Catholic church in our country."

~ Fr. John Hardon, S.J.

I witnessed Fr. Hardon say this in his sermon during a Mass at a Catholic homeschooling conference in Manassas VA back in the early 1990's. Never has a truer word been spoken regarding the importance of homeschooling to the Catholic Church.
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#23
I have talked to two priests in the Confessional when I decided to pull my children out of the Catholic School connected to our closest parish.

Specifically they recommended them to stay in the Catholic School vs Home Schooling as their opinion was that many Home School families in our parish were stuggling with the task, if not doing a poor job.

There reason for staying in the Catholic School was that at least they went to Mass, and although poor, at least there was some, no matter how little, adherence to the Faith.

I had to disagree and go with +Sheen who said if you want to have your children lose their Faith, send them to a Catholic School.

Now I realize that everyone who sends their children to Public School all claim they have decent, or good, or great schools. In my case it is actually objectively true as I live in a very affluent town where the competition for teaching jobs is so fierce that they will accept less money for such a plum assignment. Of course by no means are they underpaid, as that is a myth I do not wish to in anyway pepetuate.

So far so good. We are actively involved in all their work, they do not watch TV or listen to popular music, and we spend lots of time with them that I am not timid to say that they go to Public School and are sufficiently deprogrammed, and augmented in their Public School work as to almost state they are both Public and Home Schooled.

For the time the balance seems to be working. Of course we monitor the situation on a daily basis.

By the way, because of the very good Public Schools in my town, the Catholic School had basically two choices to attract a shrinking enrollment, of an already dismal amount of students. They could go more Orthodox and present actual Catholic education, or they could go more progressive and liberal. I don't think I need to tell you the choice made.

So far, they are still losing students in grades 1 thru 8. They have had, for sometime an all day Kindergarten, but have no added all day pre-school. Very Catholic concept, I know.(Sarcasm).

I predicted this move to out-progressing the progressives and I am satisfied with my choice.

By the way, I went to Public Schools and I think I turned out OK. Also, in my day the same Catholic School that my children were attending produced the most wild juvenile delinquents in town. And this is when they were still being taught by mostly, if not all, nuns.
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#24
I always wanted to ask - are highschool aged children homeschooled too? it must be very hard for a child who was homeschooled grades 1 through 8 to go to a highschool.

What about doing both? A few grades in school and a few grades at home? We have a woman in our parish who homeschools her two children, a boy and a girl, and I think the children actually come to school and sit in the classrooms one day of the week. The boy is an also an altar server and the girl is in scouts. They seem to do okay socially.
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#25
(05-31-2011, 05:00 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: I always wanted to ask - are highschool aged children homeschooled too? it must be very hard for a child who was homeschooled grades 1 through 8 to go to a highschool.

What about doing both? A few grades in school and a few grades at home? We have a woman in our parish who homeschools her two children, a boy and a girl, and I think the children actually come to school and sit in the classrooms one day of the week. The boy is an also an altar server and the girl is in scouts. They seem to do okay socially.

I've known families that homeschool the whole way through and others who homeschool K-8 and then do regular high school.  Both seem to work out fine.

Switching grades might not, though.  I think it might be hard to be with friends, and then not, and then have an adjustment period each time.
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#26
(05-31-2011, 05:00 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: I always wanted to ask - are highschool aged children homeschooled too?


I've got two homeschooled high schoolers. One 'graduates' this weekend and the other is wrapping up his sophomore year.  They are anything but socially awkward or sheltered. My daughter will be going to an excellent Catholic liberal arts university  (with 3/4 of the cost covered by scholarships and grants) in August and my son will spend his summer bouncing from activity to activity. This time next week he will be at flight school, in a couple more weeks he will be at an encampment as squadron commander and have over 60 cadets under his responsibility and is part of the cadet command staff that is planning a 1 week encampment with over 300 cadets total, a couple weeks after that he leaves for a prestigious and selective leadership school.  Weekly, he is deputy commander of a squadron of 70 cadets.  He also works, is a brown belt in taekwondo, plays in a community chess club, serves on the altar almost weekly and carries a 3.83 GPA .  He is 16. Oh and he is teaching himself to play the guitar and he is pretty good actually.
J. is the antithesis of antisocial or awkward. The only times he comes off awkward is when he doesn't get some of the crude jokes other boys his age tell.
He did great in his communtiy college class, students-some in their mid-20's, chose to sit with and talk with him before and after class. He was well liked and accepted by the class and teacher despite his age. same with dd and her experience in CC classes.
Next year I'll have a high school freshman and junior. 7th grader, 5th grader, 2nd grader, kindergartener and two little ones. It is hard and to say that sometimes I feel burned out is an understantment but dh and I are starting to see the fruits of our labors.  I think my kids are great, but they really aren't all that unusual in the homeschool world. of my daughters friends one is going to Rice almost on a full ride, another is one of the top 20 young pianists in the country.We also know a homeschooled young man who is a junior at the USAFA.

The homeschooling failures. The kids who can't read, the ones who can't do bnasic math..these are the ones theat priests hear about or are asked to interveene with. We don't go bragging around about our kids. I doubt our priest even knows my daughters name let alone  what univesrsity she is atetndin,g and doesn't know anything about my son outside the sacristy but i bet he can tell you exactly who the homeschooling families are that have illiterate  teenagers.
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#27
I heartily agree with "mom" above...
And regarding high school...if you think your kids have a lot of aptitude in math and science and there is no local homeschooling co-op where you can get help teaching in these areas, then send them to whatever high school you think will fit them.  I homeschooled two so far through high school...no fantastic abilities as far as grades went in high school (but then, they do Kolbe, much of which is college level).  But one graduated Summa Cum Laude from the community college and now is on the Dean's List at the State University.  The second was on Dean's list last semester at same State U. and did quite well this semester, but probably won't make Dean's list.

From what I see, although my kids didn't excel in high school, they sure have the drive to do well and succeed in college; much more drive than what they see in most of their classmates.  My girls come home daily with stories of students complaining because the professors marked them down for having too many unexcused absences or because they got poor grades for missing exams, etc.  My second daughter is NOT a math whiz, but she managed a B+ in her college algebra course just because, I think, she did all the homework, came to class every day, took all the quizzes, etc. , whereas from what she said, the teacher sent out emails lamenting that most of the kids didn't do the assigned homework, didn't even attempt problems on the exams, etc.  Granted, this is a state school, and maybe attitudes aren't like this at better colleges?

Christina
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#28
Homeschooling sucks, but it is the best we have.  It is tough on the moms.  We need trad chapels to step up and build real Catholic schools, and with nuns to keep the price affordable.

The social shyness thing has nothing to do with homeschooling.  It depends on the parents.  Put you kids into county programs.  Sign the boys up for baseball and wrestling.  Sign the girls up for ballet, theater and band.  Don't isolate them.  Boyscouts are good for boys also.

Given a choice between a rural public school, or a N.O. parish school, I would bet 99% of the time you are better off with the public school.  Parish schools teach outright heresy and they still teach marxist leninism.

Homeschool works if you get your kids into activities.
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#29
(05-31-2011, 07:44 PM)introibo Wrote: ; much more drive than what they see in most of their classmates.  My girls come home daily with stories of students complaining because the professors marked them down for having too many unexcused absences or because they got poor grades for missing exams, etc.Christina

My son was completely flabbergasted by the laissez-faire attitude of students in his class. He was the only student who always did the homework. he just didn't get how kids came to the class and when asked to share their answer toa  homework question just shrugged and said they didn't get to it. A bunch of students also didn't turn up for the final and received zeros. The idea that a student is fine with mediocre  grades or failure is a completely alien concept to him.  If a student is having trouble understanding yet still working hard (he helped kids like this) it is one thing but he said a lot of the kids just didn't care.
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#30
The homeschooled kids at my chapel are socially more sophisticated than those who attend public or private schools. If I could, I'd homeschool, but it's not in the cards so to speak.

Scip, kids are kids. They aren't their parents.  Some will be shy, while some will be absolutely great at making friends. I contend it has nothing to do with he parents and nearly  everything to do with the kid's personality, because we have a mix of both here at home.
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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