Going to hell for rejecting vocation?
#1
Has the church ever ruled officially on what happens to those who reject a priest/religious vocation?  Are they headed to hell? Are they most likely going to go there unless they do _X penance? Is it fair to compare a young man's discernment in modern day society to that of the 12 apostles themselves 2,000 years ago? Or are they slightly different callings?
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#2
No, you won't go to hell if you are in a state of grace.  Deciding that the priesthood is not for you is not a mortal sin.  So the normal Catholic teaching applies.  Pray, receive the sacraments, and be charitable. 
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#3
(05-31-2011, 08:00 PM)James02 Wrote: No, you won't go to hell if you are in a state of grace.  Deciding that the priesthood is not for you is not a mortal sin.  So the normal Catholic teaching applies.  Pray, receive the sacraments, and be charitable. 

Yes, that's my understanding as well - vocations are calls to holiness, and although it's probably prudent to follow God's plan for one's life (especially if it really is a legitimate call), there's no pain of sin for not following that specific call.
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#4
Are you asking if those who don't join the clergy are going to hell?  Are you serious?  Take a step back and a deep breath and ask yourself that question again. 

Quote:Is it fair to compare a young man's discernment in modern day society to that of the 12 apostles themselves 2,000 years ago? Or are they slightly different callings?

It is always right to view ourselves in contrast with the saints.  We should imitate their and Christ's life.  That doesn't mean we are all called to be in a religious order. 

Again, I think its best if you bring up these frequent concerns regarding your vocation to a priest.  If the way is truly that cloudy to you then you must seek spiritual guidance.
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#5
So was the rich young man who refused to sell his possessions and follow Christ in a state of grace after he made that decision?
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#6
(05-31-2011, 08:04 PM)st.dominic_savio Wrote: So was the rich young man who refused to sell his possessions and follow Christ in a state of grace after he made that decision?

He refused to even become a Christian and instead chose his worldly belongings.  He was substituting creature for Creator.  That's not even remotely similar to not following a specific vocation.
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#7
(05-31-2011, 08:04 PM)Mithrandylan Wrote: Are you asking if those who don't join the clergy are going to hell?  Are you serious?  Take a step back and a deep breath and ask yourself that question again. 

Quote:Is it fair to compare a young man's discernment in modern day society to that of the 12 apostles themselves 2,000 years ago? Or are they slightly different callings?

It is always right to view ourselves in contrast with the saints.  We should imitate their and Christ's life.  That doesn't mean we are all called to be in a religious order. 

Again, I think its best if you bring up these frequent concerns regarding your vocation to a priest.  If the way is truly that cloudy to you then you must seek spiritual guidance.

Yes I plan on meeting with a priest  this week for sure. I went on a date the other night, and it went really well. I was very happy for the first few hours afterwards. However, the next day I felt this huge sadness/despair/depression that I was becoming lukewarm and not following the right path God had sent to me. I am so depressed today I can't even describe it. I honestly feel sick to my stomach laying in bed in teh fetal position. And the worst part is is that I should really break up with the girl ASAP so I do not break her heart and destroy her feelings. Lately I have been looking up whether its normal to feel extremely depressed about your "calling" in life. Suprisingly, I found that there have been some saints who were not attracted to the religious life at all but did it because they thought that was what God wanted them to do, however reluctant they may be. I just read today that St. Therese's sister was not attracted to being a nun at all, but did it anyway. St Therese commended her on this because St. Therese felt that this depression/resentment her sister had towards her vocation was actually a sign it was the right one.

Again, I will bring this issue up to the priest this week I just wanted to get your opinions as well. I really don't have anyone to talk to about this. My family is set in their liberal NO ways and they have already tried to make sure that I am not pursuing the priesthood. Talking to them about this kind of stuff will just screw me up even more. Thank you.
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#8
[quote='st.dominic_savio' pid='778829' dateline='1306887202']
[quote='Mithrandylan' pid='778812' dateline='1306886663']
Are you asking if those who don't join the
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#9
(05-31-2011, 08:07 PM)Pheo Wrote:
(05-31-2011, 08:04 PM)st.dominic_savio Wrote: So was the rich young man who refused to sell his possessions and follow Christ in a state of grace after he made that decision?

He refused to even become a Christian and instead chose his worldly belongings.  He was substituting creature for Creator.  That's not even remotely similar to not following a specific vocation.

Well could it be that the rich mans "wealth" could be also be a metaphor to the masculine desire to be a husband and father? If a man flat out rejects the call because he wants a wife, isn't this the same concept of the rich man rejecting the call because he couldn't sacrifice his cash?

That was at least my interpretation when reading this passage in scripture.
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#10
(05-31-2011, 08:21 PM)st.dominic_savio Wrote:
(05-31-2011, 08:07 PM)Pheo Wrote:
(05-31-2011, 08:04 PM)st.dominic_savio Wrote: So was the rich young man who refused to sell his possessions and follow Christ in a state of grace after he made that decision?

He refused to even become a Christian and instead chose his worldly belongings.  He was substituting creature for Creator.  That's not even remotely similar to not following a specific vocation.

Well could it be that the rich mans "wealth" could be also be a metaphor to the masculine desire to be a husband and father?

:laughing: I'm not sure how you came to that interpretation of the passage. I took wealth to mean, well, wealth.
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