Church Latin Was Never the Everyday Language of the People
#11
Well, the ecclesiastical Latin of the St. Jerome's Vulgate really was the language of the vulgus--the common people. The style of the Canon and ancient collects is very elevated, though.
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#12
(06-04-2011, 09:11 AM)Augstine Baker Wrote: Lots of folks.

Name three who made this claim.

It would be best if you'd name three well-known people and could cite when and where they made this claim.  That shouldn't be difficult if "lots of folks" made this claim.
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#13
I read somewhere that Church Latin was like Shakespeare compared to the why the ordinary people spoke.
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#14
(06-04-2011, 03:17 PM)irmatvep Wrote: I read somewhere that Church Latin was like Shakespeare compared to the why the ordinary people spoke.

Actually, Ecclesiastical Latin has varying styles. Some styles of it are very much like how Latin was spoken/written by post-Roman users of the language. Since it was the language of literacy, it was used by people with varying backgrounds. The actual use of Latin in the Church is not always complex or poetic.

Shakespeare wrote for ordinary people so the words are ordinary for the most part.
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#15
(06-04-2011, 03:10 PM)Revixit Wrote:
(06-04-2011, 09:11 AM)Augstine Baker Wrote: Lots of folks.

Name three who made this claim.

It would be best if you'd name three well-known people and could cite when and where they made this claim.   That shouldn't be difficult if "lots of folks" made this claim.

Most people  have heard the claim that the Mass in the Latin was originally in the language of the people.  It wasn't.
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#16
(06-04-2011, 03:10 PM)Revixit Wrote:
(06-04-2011, 09:11 AM)Augstine Baker Wrote: Lots of folks.

Name three who made this claim.

It would be best if you'd name three well-known people and could cite when and where they made this claim.   That shouldn't be difficult if "lots of folks" made this claim.

I couldn't name any specific people, but I have heard the claim used as a justification for using the vernacular today. The claim is that the mass was originally in Greek, but was switched to Latin because that was "the vernacular" of the time. hence, why not switch it again to the current vernacular?

i don't have a dog in this fight, but that's the claim/argument that I've heard.
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#17
(06-04-2011, 04:18 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:
(06-04-2011, 03:10 PM)Revixit Wrote:
(06-04-2011, 09:11 AM)Augstine Baker Wrote: Lots of folks.

Name three who made this claim.

It would be best if you'd name three well-known people and could cite when and where they made this claim.   That shouldn't be difficult if "lots of folks" made this claim.

I couldn't name any specific people, but I have heard the claim used as a justification for using the vernacular today. The claim is that the mass was originally in Greek, but was switched to Latin because that was "the vernacular" of the time. hence, why not switch it again to the current vernacular?

i don't have a dog in this fight, but that's the claim/argument that I've heard.

I heard this garbage back when I was in school from a third rate female with an axe to grind.  Too bad I didn't know then what I know now.  We were completely unprepared for these people when we went to school, and they swore they had our best interest at heart.  What a load of malarky.
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#18
I've noticed by the lives of the priests and laity since Vatican 2 how much more they understand the Mass and Faith,  LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL..................If you believe that i have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell you.
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