Your friends reaction to your Faith
#1
For those of you who converted/reverted to the Church how did your non-Catholic friends take the news?

Anger? Confusion? Interest? Indifference?
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#2
Well, I am not a convert, but my mother was and she told me that her firends all had different attitudes toward her conversion.

Her very close friends were upset, but because they were such good friends they well at least tried to understand from her perspective why she was converting. For those friends who were not "best friends", just so long as she was happy.

I know that her family were very much angered by her conversion, and even now they cannot speak to her or write a letter without saying something along the lines of "what on earth did you join the Catholics for??" Or "what satisfaction does being a Catholic bring, you can't do anything??"
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#3
I converted in 2010. Anglicans were open to it and welcoming, Evangelicals ranged between confused and angry.
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#4
I'm not a convert but my husband and I returned to the church after wandering away in our 20s.  My sister found our religious focus disturbing and interpreted it as me judging her for not going to church.  Strangely enough, her paranoia (or perhaps her conscience bugging her) opened up conversations about the faith.  And now, she's going to mass regularly.  Thank God!  :) 
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#5
I'm a revert of sorts. Our family was one of the typical fallen aways of the early 70s so I wasn't baptized until 6 mos (some of my aunts went a little nuts and did an emergency baptism while they were babysitting me). My mom stopped worrying so much about sacraments at that point and got the ecumenism bug when it came to me and sent me from the Lutheran VBS to the Baptist Awana, but never, ever to CCD. I wasn't Confirmed. Anyway...she felt tons of guilt for "neglecting" me (her word) when I finally was confirmed, but she was happy and tells me all the time to pray for my "sinful mother" (her words again) She hasn't gone back, but I keep trying. My brother hasn't said a nice word to me since I was confirmed, however. He calls it crap. I don't see him or hear from him any more. One of my closest friends gives me grief almost daily and questions every tenet of the faith that she comes across. FYI, she's against all of them, but I think I'm making slow, baby step progress with her. Her family (all fallen away) has gone from being almost abusive to me about it to being curious to supportive when I don't compromise my faith one tiny bit. Some of them confess to me, so to speak, that they want something more, too. One even whispered to me and asked if she could go to confession, then another one told me secretly that he prays, too. That's mostly what I've found with friends and family, a little bit of abrasiveness at first and then when I don't budge and I just present myself with joy and not condemnation, they seem to wonder what it is that is going right for me.
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#6
I use to be a liberal  NO catholic who rarely attended mass from around 2001 up until 2009..... I had my conversion around Spring of 2009 and a few Doctors diagnosed me Bi Polar because they thought I was over the top talking about how I would love to be like the Saints and Mystics, and how everything in the world went to sh*t after 1960.... I'm convinced all I have is anxiety/clinical depression.! Only God knows!

Anyway, my Liberal Catholic mother( I love her) was okay with my conversion, but she couldn't understand why I suddenly was against contraception, CITH, women on the Altar, attending the TLM, etc....
I don't know how my friends feel as they really haven't paid attention or said much about it all!

Anyone have similar stories??
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#7
I'm a lifelong Catholic, but when I was six, the TLM we had in CA was replaced with the NO just begun in NY, and I attended those, as well as rather liberal Catholic schools, through high school. My twenties and thirties I attended Novus Ordo Mass. When I began to more fully return to my Faith, I began to get razzed by some coworkers. Not a big deal. The coworker in question is something of a fallen-away calvinist, to coin a phrase, and the scant comment or two made indicated some things to me, but I do not worry about it.

Perhaps more interesting to you kind folks would be my parents. They are both converts. My father's dad and grandfather were presbyterian ministers, and apparently that section of the family had been so since John Knox. When he's spoken about it, he described his conversion as more intellectual. The manner he used told me that he had found loose threads, in so many words, and followed them to their proper conclusion. My grandparents were surprised, but accepted it gracefully. I would say that, in spite of being members of that denomination, they were good and holy people

My mother came from a general fundamentalist background. My grandparents had divorced when she was very young, and my grandmother visited many different denominations. My mom and I talked about this a few weeks ago. She said that she'd always felt a pull to Catholicism, even as a young girl. When she came into the Church, my grandmother was there, but wore all black. Don't get me wrong. I loved my grandmother, but it could be said that she occasionally had a flair for the dramatic gesture.

I would say that some non-Catholic friends were confused and some indifferent. One of them is a fallen-away Catholic, for whom I frequently pray. In his case, I do try to entice and admonish.
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#8
I am not a convert either but fallen away and come back.  My mother converted when she married dad.  About 5 years ago my older brother told me when he was a kid mom wouldn't let him out of the house on a day in July when there was a parade that he wanted to go to, the Orange Parade.  I guess mom knew.  Funny we never see those Orange Parades around here anymore.

Recently I have had a couple of non-Catholics tell me that they respect it when I bless myself when passing a Catholic Church.  One allowed me to tell him why Catholics do this.  Just last week when helping my brother (who doesn't attend Mass) by driving him to do some things I'd bless myself when passing a couple of Catholic Churches.  I figured I'd remind him when I did it by explaining why.  Just before passing the last Church I told him to "pay homage to his Lord" and he did that time (smile).  Four of my brothers don't attend Mass but my sister does.  Recently I gave them all a copy of the Three Days of Darkness, some Holy Water, Holy Salt and Blessed Candles.  It scared my sister but at least she is prepared now.  I haven't got a response from my brothers yet and I don't care if they think I'm coo coo (smile).

Just last night a non-Catholic friend from the neighborhood dropped over when I was just finishing a post in here about the Consecration of Russia.  I asked her to let me finish the post first and then I proceeded to tell her a bit about Fatima.  She was impressed with the promise of a period of peace if the Consecration is done properly.  I'll have to talk to her some more about it.  I remember an Anglican lady being very impressed with this Catholic lady that I know who told the Anglican lady that she would pray for her request and her request was eventually granted.  I read a Protestant web site that was requesting more Catholic priests trained to do exorcisms because it often wasn't working for them.  So I think there is respect for Catholics among some Protestant communities.  For those that aren't, oh well.
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#9
I was Orthodox and most of my Orthodox friends simply quit speaking to me. Those few who continued to speak to me used words like 'traitor'.
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#10
I am a convert and crossed the Tiber in 2008.  I lost a lot of friends, A LOT, and most of my family members think I'm going to Hell. Well at least I'm getting a lot of prayers right? The more they pray though, the more Catholic I become so YAY.

My problem now is that the more I grow in spirituality the more I tick people off, especially my husband. He says I should lighten up and not take things so seriously. Which is good advice normally but the state of your soul is a serious matter. He doesn't understand that.
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