Your friends reaction to your Faith
#21
I'm somewhat of a revert (a reversion from apathy.  Does that count?).

At first, my secular friends found me annoying.  Because I fell back in love with the Faith hard and couldn't stop talking about it.  I'm sure I was annoying.

Then they just basically drifted away.  I've learned to temper the discussions more and have rekindled some of the better friendships.  For some of the others, I've just had to shake the dust from my sandals (knowing now that I was part of the problem.  I didn't have any way to temper my zeal) and replace them with new friends.

That's a slower process these days.  For better and worse.
Reply
#22
Initially, at the time of my Confirmation there was polite acceptance, but along the lines of it being viewed as a cultural association rather than something deeper.  There was also coldness from non-religious, non-Catholic family.

When people realized that I was actually attempting to follow the Catholic faith, almost uniformly opinions turned negative.  This included born and raised Catholics.

Reply
#23
(06-09-2011, 10:28 AM)kingtheoden Wrote: Initially, at the time of my Confirmation there was polite acceptance, but along the lines of it being viewed as a cultural association rather than something deeper.  There was also coldness from non-religious, non-Catholic family.

When people realized that I was actually attempting to follow the Catholic faith, almost uniformly opinions turned negative.  This included born and raised Catholics.

I also found that some cradle Catholics got really nasty when they found out I was following the Church law by the book. They would try to convince me that you didn't really have to do it. Very sad and very frustrating.
Reply
#24
(06-09-2011, 04:47 PM)FaustinaClare Wrote:
(06-09-2011, 10:28 AM)kingtheoden Wrote: Initially, at the time of my Confirmation there was polite acceptance, but along the lines of it being viewed as a cultural association rather than something deeper.  There was also coldness from non-religious, non-Catholic family.

When people realized that I was actually attempting to follow the Catholic faith, almost uniformly opinions turned negative.  This included born and raised Catholics.

I also found that some cradle Catholics got really nasty when they found out I was following the Church law by the book. They would try to convince me that you didn't really have to do it. Very sad and very frustrating.

I think Chesterton has a quote that says something like, "the worst argument for Catholicism are Catholics them selves." Or something to that effect.
Reply
#25
I was raised sort of cafeteria-esque and went to a very cafeteria school.  Nearly left the faith because I was told I needed to be a socialist and I got very confused.  Came back rather quickly and became pretty much what people here would call a neo-con (and I was, except for the fact that I didn't even know that there was such a thing as being traditionalist and I was always sort of uncomfortable with things like communion in the hand but without being able to give a good reason why). 

I went away to college and I was pretty shocked at the liturgical abuses and liberalism -- it wasn't that bad where I was from. Then again, a year later, I met my first trad and he took me to TLM.  I took to it right away, found FE not long after, and haven't looked back.

My mother took it the best -- she's now a traditionalist herself.  My dad's been non-practicing for a long time, but I pray for him.

My friends are pretty cool with it.  I think a lot of them think I'm just old fashioned that way -- I've always liked old things and I've never felt like I was quite born in the right century.  Most of them don't really understand that there is different theology involved, although my Catholic friends do understand this.  One of my protestant friends always talks about how my husband, myself, and the friend who introduced me to tradition are the "only real Catholics" she knows.  All the other Catholics she knows are cafeteria or cultural.

My husband's family doesn't seem to understand the Tradition thing, but they just look the other way and shrug it off.  His mom did have a rather nasty reaction when we refused to have a city hall wedding and I mentioned that it wouldn't be valid in the eyes of the Church -- turns out she has some relatives who've done that and so I got accused of judging them and such, even though my husband had no idea (let alone told me).  They also support in vetro and such, so we fear that they may try to push us down that road and then get upset and accuse us of judging.  They were also pretty shocked that we wanted a Latin Mass wedding, and I'm not quite sure what my husband said to get them to calm down.  :p

My grandma has also been pretty anti-traditional, saying that we are anti-progress and such.  She supports women being priests and stuff like that though.
Reply
#26
Some "friends" as well as family basically cannot understand. You spend to much time on this, you always want to go to Church, why don't you just go and live there and become a priest, it's all you care about, here you go goigng über-Catholic, I was even given the nickname "Cardinal (Last Name withheld)" in high school. That I'm ignorant, can't really know for sure, how dare I say "hard teachings" (that the Catholic Church is the one true religion, extra ecclesiam nulla salus, no masturbation, sex, lusting, fasting, adherence to tradition and the Old Mass beyond today's norms, etc. Even a very dear and close friend of mine, really the only friend I have that I agrees with me on some moral issues, is not a practicing Catholic and says I take it to far (just like Muslims.)

As a matter of fact, when announced to family and some friends that I may have a vocation, I was seriously hurt. Family members who should have supported me second guessed me etc, and it was because of my own weakness and human respect that I resisted telling anyone how I feel on these matters.
Reply
#27
What WRC said also kinda applies to me. I was always Catholic (first regular, then conservative, then Traditional, however I did not seriously attempt to live out the Faith and put God first until two years ago. I was basically a white sepulcher, a hypocrite whose actions did not reflect his supposedly traditional Catholic faith.) By the grace of God, and I'm sure with the intercession of His most blessed and ever virgin Mother, I have the pearl of great price. Many who were once considers friends cannot be so any more, but also, new friends are made.
Reply
#28
I don't understand why people just jump to the assumption that just b/c you try to live your faith that you should be a priest, nun, monk, etc. My husband says that all the time. Why didn't you just become a nun! Well if I had a vocation for that then I would have.
Reply
#29
(06-10-2011, 05:03 PM)FaustinaClare Wrote: My husband says that all the time. Why didn't you just become a nun!

Perhaps, you should try tell him next time: "Now that you mention it, you're probably right, love. I think I'll leave you to enter a convent. It's good to know I can count on your support."
Reply
#30
(06-10-2011, 05:08 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(06-10-2011, 05:03 PM)FaustinaClare Wrote: My husband says that all the time. Why didn't you just become a nun!

Perhaps, you should try tell him next time: "Now that you mention it, you're probably right, love. I think I'll leave you to enter a convent. It's good to know I can count on your support."

That sounds bitter.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)