Your friends reaction to your Faith
#31
My New Age friends - which means nearly all my old friends - are often in complete denial.

They cannot understand and keep "creating their own reality" that I am still with them ... :laughing:

One of them complimented me and said it was so good that I wanted to help the Church. I suspect he meant that it was good that I the great advanced New Ager would stoop towards that poor backward thing ...

Something like that anyway.

I suspect he was very shocked when I said: "It is not I who am helping the Church, it is the Church that is healing me!"

What?! How could that "Old Age" Church be of any use to anyone?! Will be the typical New Age reaction ...

I think they really cannot handle it and when they do realise it, show not the slightest interest at all as to how I could have dumped their whole architecture for something so "backwards".

Very occasionally I have had smug comments as to how they could see how someone would want to retreat into the "safety" of an organised religion

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#32
I grew up Catholic but it was mainly a cultural thing. My parents rarely went to Church. It was only in my mid twenties that I came back to the Church.

So, to sum up:

My trad friends - They're few but most of them are fine people. There may be a cuckoo or two there but it's rather expectable given the closed environment.

My regular friends - Most of them are either lapsed Catholics, lefties or liberals. I'm in good terms with everyone and they respect my faith. I can only hope to be an instrument of God's grace to them but I also have the conscience that I fail to set an edifying example most of the time.
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#33
(06-10-2011, 05:21 PM)m.PR Wrote:
(06-10-2011, 05:08 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(06-10-2011, 05:03 PM)FaustinaClare Wrote: My husband says that all the time. Why didn't you just become a nun!

Perhaps, you should try tell him next time: "Now that you mention it, you're probably right, love. I think I'll leave you to enter a convent. It's good to know I can count on your support."

That sounds bitter.

It's called turning up a notch.
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#34
(06-10-2011, 05:38 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(06-10-2011, 05:21 PM)m.PR Wrote:
(06-10-2011, 05:08 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(06-10-2011, 05:03 PM)FaustinaClare Wrote: My husband says that all the time. Why didn't you just become a nun!

Perhaps, you should try tell him next time: "Now that you mention it, you're probably right, love. I think I'll leave you to enter a convent. It's good to know I can count on your support."

That sounds bitter.

It's called turning up a notch.
Faustina, I’m really sorry to hear that your husband is so unaware of the truths of Catholicism. Assuming you guys are sacramentally married (right?) he’d have to die for you become a nun. Either way he’s not thinking thru the implications of what he’s saying.
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#35
(06-10-2011, 06:23 PM)Bakuryokuso Wrote:
(06-10-2011, 05:38 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(06-10-2011, 05:21 PM)m.PR Wrote:
(06-10-2011, 05:08 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(06-10-2011, 05:03 PM)FaustinaClare Wrote: My husband says that all the time. Why didn't you just become a nun!

Perhaps, you should try tell him next time: "Now that you mention it, you're probably right, love. I think I'll leave you to enter a convent. It's good to know I can count on your support."

That sounds bitter.

It's called turning up a notch.
Faustina, I’m really sorry to hear that your husband is so unaware of the truths of Catholicism. Assuming you guys are sacramentally married (right?) he’d have to die for you become a nun. Either way he’s not thinking thru the implications of what he’s saying.

He isn't saying I should be one now. We had a sacramental marriage, everything done perfectly in accordance with the Church law, with a full mass. He gets frustrated with me being "too Catholic" and is saying why didn't I become a Nun INSTEAD of getting married to him. He thinks that anyone who is like me must either want to be a priest, nun, monk etc. I just think it is his frustration b/c he is a cradle/culture Catholic and never had to think much about it. I had a chance to become a nun and didn't want to b/c I knew deep down it wasn't for me. I keep telling him that.
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#36
FaustinClare,

Point out to your husband that it was not just Priests and monks manning the ranks of the crusader armies.  Remind him that many kings and queens were renowned for their dedication to the Faith and are recognized as Saints.
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#37
(06-10-2011, 10:34 PM)kingtheoden Wrote: FaustinClare,

Point out to your husband that it was not just Priests and monks manning the ranks of the crusader armies.  Remind him that many kings and queens were renowned for their dedication to the Faith and are recognized as Saints.

See UnamSanctam's avatar.
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#38
Oddly enough, most of my friends and relatives haven't given me any grief for going to a TLM. My mother did at first ("You can't understand it!") then I reminded her that she, being a Charismatic, goes to those meetings and conferences where people babble in tongues and no one understands them. Not to mention we have the translations on the other side of the Missal.

Here's another personal story, which shows how God works and has a sense of humor, to boot: a little over a week ago, I stopped in the bar my father hangs out in to get a drink of Diet Coke after I finished my three mile run. A woman there mentioned to me that my father told her I go to the Latin Mass, and I replied, "Oh yeah, there's one in Tivoli (NY) across the river at 12 noon every Sunday." She mentioned she'd like to go, as she hadn't been to one in over 20 years, when she went to one in New Mexico. So, I wrote down the directions for her and gave them to her. She told me I must be really serious about my Catholicism, and I told her in front of a handful of people: "I go to the REAL Mass, not Catholicism Lite!" To which even my father, a nominal Presbyterian who hasn't been to a church service on Sunday since he was about five years old, said, "Yeah, guitars and banjos don't cut it!"  ;D

Of all the places to find another recruit for the TLM; a local bar.  :beer: :cheers: :beer: Never did I think in a million years that I'd ever find anyone interested in a TLM there.
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#39
(06-10-2011, 08:46 PM)FaustinaClare Wrote: He gets frustrated with me being "too Catholic" and is saying why didn't I become a Nun INSTEAD of getting married to him.

Wow, your hubby really doesn't know how to talk to a lady, sheesh. He should read a book or two about it!!!  :o
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#40
(06-12-2011, 03:56 PM)Bakuryokuso Wrote:
(06-10-2011, 08:46 PM)FaustinaClare Wrote: He gets frustrated with me being "too Catholic" and is saying why didn't I become a Nun INSTEAD of getting married to him.

Wow, your hubby really doesn't know how to talk to a lady, sheesh. He should read a book or two about it!!!  :o

I guess I'm giving people a really bad impression about him. That isn't what I should be doing and I'm sorry. In all other respects he treats me beyond well, and actually spoils me a little. He was raised Catholic and his family is kind of bleh about it. He goes to mass every Sunday if he doesn't have an emergency and gets called into work and that is all they think is required of them. He doesn't believe in abortion, contraception, etc. like a good Catholic. The only problem is that he doesn't believe he should do anything else and I do. Maybe it is my protestant background but I crave learning and growing and see my conversion as an ongoing process. I want to be a Saint. I don't think he thinks about it all that much. What I do makes him uncomfortable and he gets frustrated and makes stupid comments. He is frustrating but I love him more than anything as I should and I think we can work this out with God's help of course.
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