Tattoo Issue
#21
There are also FSSP churches/mass centres in Tulsa:

http://fssp-tulsa.org/

and Edmond:

http://fssp.com/press/locations/archdioc...-oklahoma/
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#22
Gatewood,

I think that the priest who responded to you was saying the right things until he got to the deliverance stuff.  If you've confessed getting the tattoo and converted then there isn't much else you need to do.  Cover it when possible so as not to cause scandal and go about your life.  The Church doesn't require that you remove it since that is so costly.

If you feel you're being harassed by any sort of demonic activity then call a trad priest, or even a good NO priest who believes in Satan.  They'll know what to do and will remedy the problem, if there is one, in the correct way.
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#23
The main thing is that she got away and managed to escape the clutches of you know who...

Here is more...

Magic happens – just ask Phnom Penh tattooist Chan Tra. The 47-year-old is one of the few Cambodian artists still able to ink magical designs on customers.

Before taking to the needle, however, he needs to pray in the ancient Pali language, the traditional language of Theravada Buddhist scripts across much of southeast Asia.

“It depends on our belief. If we believe that a tattoo is magical, it will have a supernatural force to protect us. But if we don’t believe that it has magic, it won’t show us its mysterious power at all,” says Chan Tra, whose customers also include foreigners.

However, his overseas clients tend to prefer decorative images such as temples, buildings or flags, he explains, while his main clientele for magic tattoos are Cambodian.

These normally feature pictures of animals such as tigers, along with scripts written in Pali, an ancient cousin of Sanskrit often used to communicate Buddhist texts.

First Chan Tra prays and calls for magic to be transferred to the skin of his customer, before taking out his needles. Many people believe that magic tattoos will help protect them from harm such as disease, snake bites or bullets, he says.



“They also believe in magic tattoos,” he says.

Professor Soeung Phos, who teaches Pali and Sanskrit to students at the Royal University of Phnom Penh, says the Pali language entered Cambodia in the 13th or 14th century, along with the spread of Theravada Buddhism.

Pali was used to record the Buddha’s teachings, he says. “After Buddhism and the Pali language entered Cambodia, people began to learn Pali instead of Sanskrit. And because people really believed in Buddhism, they even thought that Buddha’s words would become magical if they tattooed them on their skin,” says the professor.
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#24
(06-08-2011, 12:07 PM)gatewood1988 Wrote:
(06-08-2011, 11:54 AM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(06-08-2011, 10:19 AM)gatewood1988 Wrote: When I was heavily involved with the occult I got a heart shaped peace sign, an ankh with angel wings, and a phoenix tattoo.

I don't think this is so bad or scandalous. I was thinking more of a dragon with 666 across its chest. LOL

LOL that's what most people expect. See and I have told people that the Ankh in egyptian mythology represents eternal life, that's why I got it with angel wings. I got the heart/peace sign because I believe in peace and love. And I got the phoenix as a sign of being reborn into new life. I just flipped about them because of people saying the symbolism is evil.

Well, peace and love are Christian.


And being reborn into new life is Christian.

Perhaps you only need to cover the ankh?
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#25
(06-09-2011, 11:21 AM)OCLittleFlower Wrote:
(06-08-2011, 12:07 PM)gatewood1988 Wrote:
(06-08-2011, 11:54 AM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(06-08-2011, 10:19 AM)gatewood1988 Wrote: When I was heavily involved with the occult I got a heart shaped peace sign, an ankh with angel wings, and a phoenix tattoo.

I don't think this is so bad or scandalous. I was thinking more of a dragon with 666 across its chest. LOL

LOL that's what most people expect. See and I have told people that the Ankh in egyptian mythology represents eternal life, that's why I got it with angel wings. I got the heart/peace sign because I believe in peace and love. And I got the phoenix as a sign of being reborn into new life. I just flipped about them because of people saying the symbolism is evil.

Well, peace and love are Christian.


And being reborn into new life is Christian.

Perhaps you only need to cover the ankh?

The problem is not so much the tattoos but the prayers to the Devil that were said upon putting them on the skin.

Please read again what follows.


Magic happens – just ask Phnom Penh tattooist Chan Tra. The 47-year-old is one of the few Cambodian artists still able to ink magical designs on customers.

Before taking to the needle, however, he needs to pray in the ancient Pali language, the traditional language of Theravada Buddhist scripts across much of southeast Asia.

“It depends on our belief. If we believe that a tattoo is magical, it will have a supernatural force to protect us. But if we don’t believe that it has magic, it won’t show us its mysterious power at all,” says Chan Tra, whose customers also include foreigners.

However, his overseas clients tend to prefer decorative images such as temples, buildings or flags, he explains, while his main clientele for magic tattoos are Cambodian.

These normally feature pictures of animals such as tigers, along with scripts written in Pali, an ancient cousin of Sanskrit often used to communicate Buddhist texts.

First Chan Tra prays and calls for magic to be transferred to the skin of his customer, before taking out his needles. Many people believe that magic tattoos will help protect them from harm such as disease, snake bites or bullets, he says.



“They also believe in magic tattoos,” he says.

Professor Soeung Phos, who teaches Pali and Sanskrit to students at the Royal University of Phnom Penh, says the Pali language entered Cambodia in the 13th or 14th century, along with the spread of Theravada Buddhism.

Pali was used to record the Buddha’s teachings, he says. “After Buddhism and the Pali language entered Cambodia, people began to learn Pali instead of Sanskrit. And because people really believed in Buddhism, they even thought that Buddha’s words would become magical if they tattooed them on their skin,” says the professor.




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#26
Oh okay, I had no idea there was anything like that involved.

:pray2: :pray2: :pray2:
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#27
(06-10-2011, 02:38 AM)OCLittleFlower Wrote: Oh okay, I had no idea there was anything like that involved.

:pray2: :pray2: :pray2:

And today we have steel rings piercing the tongue, piercing the ears, piercing the nose... I tell you, Little Flower... I may be wrong on this, but I have to tell you... I have seen cows with steel rings piercing their nose... the herder then puts a rope through the ring and pulls the cow to wherever he wants.  I consider this symbolic... as if an unseen spirit is pulling that person to  you know where...
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#28
Not sure if this is feasible but why not tattoo right over them with your skin color - might not look so great but you said you can keep those areas covered.............or perhaps you could have the tattoo guy re-tattoo them so as to change them into something not demonic?
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#29
(06-08-2011, 02:46 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: [quote='JayneK' pid='785797' dateline='1307558087']
Even though the pagan gods are not real and the sacrifices made to them had no power

I wouldn't be so rash as to dismiss all pagan gods as figments of the imagination.

[quote=Psalm
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#30
(06-10-2011, 05:00 PM)Pilgrim_here Wrote: Anyways, getting back to the thread - I think the OP is fine.  He's confessed and is going to try to remove it if he can afford it - meantime, he's covering it up.  What more can he do?

Well, he is a she, but, other than that, I agree.  :)
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