Tattoo Issue
#61
Or St. John of the Cross in the Spiritual Canticle of the Soul (commentary on 1):

Quote:For the clearer understanding of this we are to keep in mind that, beside the many kinds of God’s visits to the soul, in which He wounds it with love, there are commonly certain secret touches of love, which, like a fiery arrow, pierce and penetrate the soul, and burn it with the fire of love. These are properly called the wounds of love, and it is of these the soul is here speaking. These wounds so inflame the will, that the soul becomes so enveloped with the fire of love as to appear consumed thereby. They make it go forth out of itself, and be renewed, and enter on another life, as the phoenix from the fire.

David, speaking of this, says, “My heart has been inflamed, and my reins have been changed; and I am brought to nothing, and I knew not.” (Ps. 72:21, 22) The desires and affections, called the reins by the prophet, are all stirred and divinely changed in this burning of the heart, and the soul, through love, melted into nothing, knowing nothing but love. At this time the changing of the reins is a great pain, and longing for the vision of God; it seems to the soul that God treats it with intolerable severity, so much so that the severity with which love treats it seems to the soul unendurable, not because it is wounded — for it considers such wounds to be its salvation — but because it is thus suffering from its love, and because He has not wounded it more deeply so as to cause death, that it may be united to Him in the life of perfect love.
Reply
#62
And St. Teresa of Avila, in her autobiography (chapter XXXIX)

Quote:I was afterwards amazed at this fire, which seems to spring forth out of the true love of God; for though I might long for it, labour for it, and annihilate myself in the effort to obtain it, I can do nothing towards procuring a single spark of it myself, because it all comes of the good pleasure of His Majesty, as I said on another occasion. It seems to burn up the old man, with his faults, his lukewarmness, and misery; so that it is like the phoenix, of which I have read that it comes forth, after being burnt, out of its own ashes into a new life. Thus it is with the soul: it is changed into another, whose desires are different, and whose strength is great. It seems to be no longer what it was before, and begins to walk renewed in purity in the ways of our Lord. When I was praying to Him that thus it might be with me, and that I might begin His service anew, He said to me: "The comparison thou hast made is good; take care never to forget it, that thou mayest always labour to advance."

The emphasis is mine.
Reply
#63
Checkmate?
Reply
#64
And a last one--for now...  :) This is from one of my favourite works: St. Ambrose's Hexaemeron (writing about the fifth day of creation):

Quote:(78) These matters have been mentioned in order that you may be aroused by the force of such examples as these to a belief in the change which will be ours at the Resurrection. We refer to that change which the Apostle clearly indicates when he says: 'We shall all indeed rise, but we shall not all be changed,' And further on he says: 'And the dead shall rise incorruptible and we shall be changed. For this corruptible body must put on incorruption and this mortal body must put on immortality. Many, interpreting the nature and appearance of that transformation which they have not attained, are not without giving it an incongruous explanation, based on an anticipation which they do not merit.

(79) In the regions of Arabia there is reported to be a bird called the phoenix. 5 This bird is said to reach the ripe old ,age of 500 years. When the phoenix realizes that he is coming to the end of his life, he builds himself a casket of incense, myrrh, and other aromatic plants, into which he enters and dies when his time has come. From the moisture proceeding from his flesh he comes to life again. In the course of time this bird puts on 'the oarage of his wings' until he is restored to his primitive form and appearance. By the very act of his resurrection the phoenix furnishes us a lesson by setting before us the very emblems of our own resurrection without the aid of precedent or of reason. We accept the fact that birds exist for the sake of man. The contrary is not true: that man exists for the sake of birds. We have here an example of the loving care which the Author and Creator of the birds has for His own saints. These He does not allow to perish, just as He does not permit in the case of one sole bird when He willed that the phoenix should rise again, born of his own seed. Who, then, announces to him the day of his death, so that he makes for himself a casket, fills it with goodly aromas, and then enters it to die there where pleasant perfumes succeed in crowding out the foul odor of death?

(80) You, too, man, should avail yourself of a casket: 'strip off the old man with his deeds and put on the new.' Your casket, your sheath, is Christ who protects and conceals you in the day of evil Do you wish to be convinced that it is a casket of protection? 'In my quiver he hath hidden me,' Scripture declares (Col 3:9-10). The casket, then, is your faith. Fill it with the goodly aroma of your virtues, that is, of chastity, compassion, and justice, and immerse yourself wholly in the inmost mysteries of faith, which are fragrant with the sweet odors of your significant deeds. May your exit from this life find you clothed with that faith, so that 'your bones may be made fat (Prov 15:30) and be like a watered garden,' (Isa 58:11) thus coming to life and flourishing. Be aware, therefore, of the day of your death, as the Apostle Paul realized when he said: 'I have fought the good fight, I have finished the course, I have kept the faith. There is laid up for me a crown of justice'. (2 Tim 4:7-8) Like the good phoenix, he entered his casket, filling it with the sweet aroma of martyrdom.
Reply
#65
(06-22-2011, 04:40 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 04:34 PM)ecclesiastes Wrote: St. Francis de Sales also uses the image in his Treatise on the Love of God (Book 7, chapter 6):

Quote:You are dead, said the great Apostle to the Colossians, and your life is hid with Christ in God.(Col. iii. 3). Death's effect is that the soul no longer lives in its body nor in the limits thereof. What then do these words of the Apostle mean, Theotimus: you are dead? it is as though he said: you no longer live in yourselves nor in the limits of your natural condition; your soul does not now live according to herself but above herself. The true nature of the phoenix lies in this, that by the help of the sunbeams, she annihilates her own life, to have a life more desirable and vigorous, hiding, as it were, her life under ashes. Silkworms change their being, and from worms become butterflies; bees are born worms, then become nymphs crawling on their feet, and at last they become flying bees. We do the same, Theotimus, if we are spiritual: for we forsake our natural life to live a more eminent life above ourselves, hiding all this new life in God with Jesus Christ, who alone sees, knows and bestows it. Our new life is heavenly love, which quickens and animates our soul, and this love is wholly hidden in God and divine things with Jesus Christ: for since (as the sacred Gospel text says), after our Saviour had shown himself for a little to his disciples as he rose up to heaven, thither above, he was at length environed with a cloud which took him and hid 301him from their view,—therefore Jesus Christ is hidden in heaven in God. Now Jesus Christ is our love, and our love is the life of our soul: therefore our life is hidden in God with Jesus Christ; and when Jesus Christ, who is our love, and consequently our spiritual life, shall appear, in the day of Judgment, we also shall appear with him in glory; that is, Jesus Christ our love will glorify us, communicating to us his felicity and splendour.

I am sure wulfrano will be here shortly to set these saints straight on their blasphemous use of pagan images.


St. Francis used the image in order to accomodate himself down to the level of the pagan minds.  I don't need such image in relation to the Resurrection.  The Crucifix and St. John's Gospel is all I need.
Reply
#66
(06-22-2011, 04:17 PM)ecclesiastes Wrote: If St. Clement somehow is not enough, here is a passage from Tertullian, De Resurrectione Carnis, chapter 13

Quote:If, however, all nature but faintly figures our resurrection; if creation affords no sign precisely like it, inasmuch as its several phenomena can hardly be said to die so much as to come to an end, nor again be deemed to be reanimated, but only reformed; then take a most complete and unassailable, symbol of our hope, for it shall be an animated being, and subject alike to life and death. I refer to the bird which is peculiar to the East, famous for its singularity, marvelous from its posthumous life, which renews its life in a voluntary death; its dying day is its birthday, for on it it departs and returns; once more a phoenix where just now there was none; once more himself, but just now out of existence; another, yet the same. What can be more express and more significant for our subject; or to what other thing can such a phenomenon bear witness? God even in His own Scripture says: "The righteous shall flourish like the phoenix; " that is, shall flourish or revive, from death, from the grave-to teach you to believe that a bodily substance may be recovered even from the fire. Our Lord has declared that we are "better than many sparrows: " well, if not better than many a phoenix too, it were no great thing. But must men die once for all, while birds in Arabia are sure of a resurrection?

The reference to God's "own Scripture" is a reference to Psalm 92:12: The just shall flourish like the palm tree: he shall grow up like the cedar of Libanus. The Greek Septuagint reads: δίκαιος ὡς φοῖνιξ ἀνθήσει ὡσεὶ κέδρος ἡ ἐν τῷ Λιβάνῳ πληθυνθήσεται. The word φοῖνιξ (phoenix) was read as a reference to the bird, though it refers to the the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera in Greek; so called, probably, after the Phoenicians), as the original Hebrew indicates.

Thank you, Ecclesiastes, for you brilliant explanation.  Indeed, Psalm CXI:13 says "palm".  Just leave pagan symbols to the pagans.
Reply
#67

"In the regions of Arabia there is reported to be a bird called the phoenix. 5 This bird is said to reach the ripe old ,age of 500 years. When the phoenix realizes that he is coming to the end of his life, he builds himself a casket of incense, myrrh, and other aromatic plants, into which he enters and dies when his time has come. From the moisture proceeding from his flesh he comes to life again. In the course of time this bird puts on 'the oarage of his wings' until he is restored to his primitive form and appearance. By the very act of his resurrection the phoenix furnishes us a lesson by setting before us the very emblems of our own resurrection without the aid of precedent or of reason. We accept the fact that birds exist for the sake of man. The contrary is not true: that man exists for the sake of birds. We have here an example of the loving care which the Author and Creator of the birds has for His own saints. These He does not allow to perish, just as He does not permit in the case of one sole bird when He willed that the phoenix should rise again, born of his own seed. Who, then, announces to him the day of his death, so that he makes for himself a casket, fills it with goodly aromas, and then enters it to die there where pleasant perfumes succeed in crowding out the foul odor of death? "



Personally, I don't need pagan mythology to explain anything pertaining to the catholic faith.  The Lord is Risen and He is shortly coming back to judge the living and the dead. Instead of wasting time checking out fantasy symbols... do instead correlate today's world eventsa with the Apocalypse.



Reply
#68
(06-22-2011, 06:17 PM)wulfrano Wrote: Just leave pagan symbols to the pagans.

So St. Clemens, Tertullian, St. Francis de Sales, St. John of the Cross, St. Teresa of Avila and St. Basil the Great (and a couple of other saints who used the image of the Phoenix) are all pagans?

(06-22-2011, 06:10 PM)wulfrano Wrote: St. Francis used the image in order to accomodate himself down to the level of the pagan minds.  I don't need such image in relation to the Resurrection.  The Crucifix and St. John's Gospel is all I need.

He wrote the work for Catholics: This Treatise then is made for a soul already devout that she may be able to advance in her design (from the Preface).

Reply
#69
(06-22-2011, 06:34 PM)ecclesiastes Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 06:17 PM)wulfrano Wrote: Just leave pagan symbols to the pagans.

So St. Clemens, Tertullian, St. Francis de Sales, St. John of the Cross, St. Teresa of Avila and St. Basil the Great (and a couple of other saints who used the image of the Phoenix) are all pagans?

No, just Wulfano knows better than them.  He also knows better than every Pope since 1958, and every ordained priest since 1968!
Reply
#70
(06-22-2011, 06:10 PM)wulfrano Wrote: I don't need such image in relation to the Resurrection.  The Crucifix and St. John's Gospel is all I need.

Good for you. But many of the Saints liked the image of the phoenix, and--if we are to believe St. Teresa of Avila--God himself approved of it.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)