Why does everyone blame God when bad things happen?
#1
A married couple has one child after years of barrenness and finally a miracle happens. At 6 years of age, the child becomes ill with leukemia and dies. People say things like "the Lord works in mysterious ways" when heartbreak like this occurs and sometimes, I think it is more cruel than helpful. I want people to come back to the Catholic Church, not turn them away.

It seems that the omnipotence of God could acknowledge a fierce struggle between good and evil in the middle but eventual victory for Jesus Christ in the end. Can't demons hurt people too, by taking people's children away or possession? Why does everyone blame God when hurtful things happen?

I've been told my views on this aren't correct by other Catholics but I don't understand why. I thought we fought against dark powers from above and that demons hate human beings, especially Catholics, because God chose to become one of us.
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#2
Sometimes there are no human answers.  The only way to get through it is through time, Faith, and prayer.  Some people never get through it.  We recognize God's permissive Will and we can't always know why He allows what He does.  We have to have faith that what He allows is best for us.  In the midst of pain, however, that can be most difficult.  Your judgement gets clouded.  It's then that we must rely on His Mercy.  Give them time.
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#3
(06-11-2011, 10:17 PM)mistman Wrote: A married couple has one child after years of barrenness and finally a miracle happens. At 6 years of age, the child becomes ill with leukemia and dies. People say things like "the Lord works in mysterious ways" when heartbreak like this occurs and sometimes, I think it is more cruel than helpful. I want people to come back to the Catholic Church, not turn them away.

It seems that the omnipotence of God could acknowledge a fierce struggle between good and evil in the middle but eventual victory for Jesus Christ in the end. Can't demons hurt people too, by taking people's children away or possession? Why does everyone blame God when hurtful things happen?

I've been told my views on this aren't correct by other Catholics but I don't understand why. I thought we fought against dark powers from above and that demons hate human beings, especially Catholics, because God chose to become one of us.

I would appreciate it very much if you would herein quote passages from the Book of Job which should solve the puzzle.
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#4
in regards the OP example:

Because some people have no idea what to say and want to say something they think wil comfort...your example is not a blame game...it is ill-ease in a tough situation....
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#5
People need someone to blame when a tragedy happens. God is the obvious target because he's the only one who could have prevented it, but didn't. This is God's permissive will in a fallen world. But God sees the bigger picture. Death isn't the worst thing that can happen.

I wouldn't start blaming the devil either. Yes, he can do some damage but the devil's main job is to tempt us to sin. Nobody dies without God's allowing it. Life and death is still in God's hands.

Of course this is little comfort to the family who has just lost a child. I, too, think that remarks like "God works in mysterious ways" OR "they're in a better place" can be awfully trite and not a comfort at all. But people do mean well, and the family usually understands that. Sometimes it's best not to grapple for answers. Just be quiet and listen. Let them vent. Let them be angry with God for awhile (because they're going to be anyway). It's OK. As long as they get beyond it.
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#6
(06-11-2011, 10:59 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: People need someone to blame when a tragedy happens. God is the obvious target because he's the only one who could have prevented it, but didn't. This is God's permissive will in a fallen world. But God sees the bigger picture. Death isn't the worst thing that can happen.

I wouldn't start blaming the devil either. Yes, he can do some damage but the devil's main job is to tempt us to sin. Nobody dies without God's allowing it. Life and death is still in God's hands.

Of course this is little comfort to the family who has just lost a child. I, too, think that remarks like "God works in mysterious ways" OR "they're in a better place" can be awfully trite and not a comfort at all. But people do mean well, and the family usually understands that. Sometimes it's best not to grapple for answers. Just be quiet and listen. Let them vent. Let them be angry with God for awhile (because they're going to be anyway). It's OK. As long as they get beyond it.

I can't believe that a strict catholic girl would say something like "let them be angry with God for awhile".  God is Pure.  God is Holy.  God is untouchable.  God is Perfect. God is Boundless Love and Goodness. It is Lucifer who sinned.  It was Adam and Eve who sinned.  It is we who sin.  The source of ALL EVIL IS SIN.  If there had not been a Luciferian Rebelion nor Original Sin no tears would have been shed by mankind.  The ultimate source of any so called "evil" in the world is satanic pride and human sin.   
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#7
Grieving people don't always think clearly. My mother lost a child, but she didn't get angry with God. Everyone is different.. Circumstances are different. When my mother lost my sister she was older and much more solid in her faith. When young couples lose a small child their reaction is often anger at God.. I think God understands.
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#8
If a child asks for a cookie from his parents and his parents say no, he often throws a temper tantrum, or at least thinks to himself what awful people his parents are.  Most often, this feeling isn't long-lasting, and I think the same can be said with people who have prayed for something from God and did not receive an answer, or at least not the one they were hoping for.  A resentment forms that God must not care because he doesn't listen.   We, like the child that wanted the cookie, fail to see the bigger picture and that God is working for our greater good.   Obviously with something more serious (the loss of a child) it's even harder to understand.
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#9
(06-11-2011, 11:25 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: Grieving people don't always think clearly. My mother lost a child, but she didn't get angry with God. Everyone is different.. Circumstances are different. When my mother lost my sister she was older and much more solid in her faith. When young couples lose a small child their reaction is often anger at God.. I think God understands.

I hope God understands and forgives ... because the reaction you mention is grievous, unfair, unkind, unwarranted, inhuman and very selfish... to say the least.
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#10
(06-11-2011, 11:25 PM)The Curt Jester Wrote: If a child asks for a cookie from his parents and his parents say no, he often throws a temper tantrum, or at least thinks to himself what awful people his parents are.  Most often, this feeling isn't long-lasting, and I think the same can be said with people who have prayed for something from God and did not receive an answer, or at least not the one they were hoping for.  A resentment forms that God must not care because he doesn't listen.   We, like the child that wanted the cookie, fail to see the bigger picture and that God is working for our greater good.   Obviously with something more serious (the loss of a child) it's even harder to understand.

We must be very careful with the use we make of words when referring to God Almighty.
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