Why does everyone blame God when bad things happen?
#91
(06-22-2011, 12:12 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote: To answer very simply the question of "why do people blame God when bad things happen?"

Because we are prideful and search for immediate and temporal comforts to our consternation instead of trusting in God.  Also, a "bad thing" must be evaluated and seen if it is really bad.  We see inconveniences to our social lives as cataclysmic events indicative of end times.  Human narcissism and self-centeredness knows no boundaries.  I'm sure some women blame God if they get pregnant.  We blame God because it is too humbling to acknowledge our own shortcomings (in the case that an event truly is "bad") and in the situations where there is no one to blame (of which there are many) it is easier to blame God than to trust in His providence.

It's a matter of perspective.  So-called bad things that happen are sometimes not bad at all, as subsequent developments may show.  My point is that everything is good, except sin.
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#92
(06-22-2011, 12:21 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:12 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote: To answer very simply the question of "why do people blame God when bad things happen?"

Because we are prideful and search for immediate and temporal comforts to our consternation instead of trusting in God.  Also, a "bad thing" must be evaluated and seen if it is really bad.  We see inconveniences to our social lives as cataclysmic events indicative of end times.  Human narcissism and self-centeredness knows no boundaries.  I'm sure some women blame God if they get pregnant.  We blame God because it is too humbling to acknowledge our own shortcomings (in the case that an event truly is "bad") and in the situations where there is no one to blame (of which there are many) it is easier to blame God than to trust in His providence.

It's a matter of perspective.  So-called bad things that happen are sometimes not bad at all, as subsequent developments may show.  My point is that everything is good, except sin.

Except for those things that are neutral.
More Catholic Discussion: http://thetradforum.com/

Go thy ways, old Jack;
die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be
not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a
shotten herring. There live not three good men
unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and
grows old: God help the while! a bad world, I say.
I would I were a weaver; I could sing psalms or any
thing. A plague of all cowards, I say still.
Reply
#93
(06-22-2011, 12:22 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:21 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:12 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote: To answer very simply the question of "why do people blame God when bad things happen?"

Because we are prideful and search for immediate and temporal comforts to our consternation instead of trusting in God.  Also, a "bad thing" must be evaluated and seen if it is really bad.  We see inconveniences to our social lives as cataclysmic events indicative of end times.  Human narcissism and self-centeredness knows no boundaries.  I'm sure some women blame God if they get pregnant.  We blame God because it is too humbling to acknowledge our own shortcomings (in the case that an event truly is "bad") and in the situations where there is no one to blame (of which there are many) it is easier to blame God than to trust in His providence.

It's a matter of perspective.  So-called bad things that happen are sometimes not bad at all, as subsequent developments may show.  My point is that everything is good, except sin.

Except for those things that are neutral.


What things are neutral?
Reply
#94
(06-22-2011, 12:25 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:22 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:21 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:12 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote: To answer very simply the question of "why do people blame God when bad things happen?"

Because we are prideful and search for immediate and temporal comforts to our consternation instead of trusting in God.  Also, a "bad thing" must be evaluated and seen if it is really bad.  We see inconveniences to our social lives as cataclysmic events indicative of end times.  Human narcissism and self-centeredness knows no boundaries.  I'm sure some women blame God if they get pregnant.  We blame God because it is too humbling to acknowledge our own shortcomings (in the case that an event truly is "bad") and in the situations where there is no one to blame (of which there are many) it is easier to blame God than to trust in His providence.

It's a matter of perspective.  So-called bad things that happen are sometimes not bad at all, as subsequent developments may show.  My point is that everything is good, except sin.

Except for those things that are neutral.


What things are neutral?

Quite a few.  TV, moderate drinking, playing sports, talking about the weather. 
More Catholic Discussion: http://thetradforum.com/

Go thy ways, old Jack;
die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be
not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a
shotten herring. There live not three good men
unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and
grows old: God help the while! a bad world, I say.
I would I were a weaver; I could sing psalms or any
thing. A plague of all cowards, I say still.
Reply
#95
(06-22-2011, 01:00 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:25 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:22 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:21 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:12 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote: To answer very simply the question of "why do people blame God when bad things happen?"

Because we are prideful and search for immediate and temporal comforts to our consternation instead of trusting in God.  Also, a "bad thing" must be evaluated and seen if it is really bad.  We see inconveniences to our social lives as cataclysmic events indicative of end times.  Human narcissism and self-centeredness knows no boundaries.  I'm sure some women blame God if they get pregnant.  We blame God because it is too humbling to acknowledge our own shortcomings (in the case that an event truly is "bad") and in the situations where there is no one to blame (of which there are many) it is easier to blame God than to trust in His providence.

It's a matter of perspective.  So-called bad things that happen are sometimes not bad at all, as subsequent developments may show.  My point is that everything is good, except sin.

Except for those things that are neutral.


What things are neutral?

Quite a few.  TV, moderate drinking, playing sports, talking about the weather. 

I don't want to disappoint you.... but.... everything we consciously and voluntarily do is either good or bad.
Reply
#96
(06-22-2011, 01:04 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 01:00 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:25 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:22 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:21 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:12 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote: To answer very simply the question of "why do people blame God when bad things happen?"

Because we are prideful and search for immediate and temporal comforts to our consternation instead of trusting in God.  Also, a "bad thing" must be evaluated and seen if it is really bad.  We see inconveniences to our social lives as cataclysmic events indicative of end times.  Human narcissism and self-centeredness knows no boundaries.  I'm sure some women blame God if they get pregnant.  We blame God because it is too humbling to acknowledge our own shortcomings (in the case that an event truly is "bad") and in the situations where there is no one to blame (of which there are many) it is easier to blame God than to trust in His providence.

It's a matter of perspective.  So-called bad things that happen are sometimes not bad at all, as subsequent developments may show.  My point is that everything is good, except sin.

Except for those things that are neutral.


What things are neutral?

Quite a few.  TV, moderate drinking, playing sports, talking about the weather. 

I don't want to disappoint you.... but.... everything we consciously and voluntarily do is either good or bad.

I'm not so sure about that.  Assuming that good= spiritually edifying and bad=spiritually destroying or hurtful?  Is this what we're talking about?  Where would you put watching a baseball game in that category?  Good or evil?
More Catholic Discussion: http://thetradforum.com/

Go thy ways, old Jack;
die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be
not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a
shotten herring. There live not three good men
unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and
grows old: God help the while! a bad world, I say.
I would I were a weaver; I could sing psalms or any
thing. A plague of all cowards, I say still.
Reply
#97
(06-22-2011, 01:07 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 01:04 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 01:00 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:25 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:22 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:21 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:12 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote: To answer very simply the question of "why do people blame God when bad things happen?"

Because we are prideful and search for immediate and temporal comforts to our consternation instead of trusting in God.  Also, a "bad thing" must be evaluated and seen if it is really bad.  We see inconveniences to our social lives as cataclysmic events indicative of end times.  Human narcissism and self-centeredness knows no boundaries.  I'm sure some women blame God if they get pregnant.  We blame God because it is too humbling to acknowledge our own shortcomings (in the case that an event truly is "bad") and in the situations where there is no one to blame (of which there are many) it is easier to blame God than to trust in His providence.

It's a matter of perspective.  So-called bad things that happen are sometimes not bad at all, as subsequent developments may show.  My point is that everything is good, except sin.

Except for those things that are neutral.


What things are neutral?

Quite a few.  TV, moderate drinking, playing sports, talking about the weather. 

I don't want to disappoint you.... but.... everything we consciously and voluntarily do is either good or bad.

I'm not so sure about that.  Assuming that good= spiritually edifying and bad=spiritually destroying or hurtful?  Is this what we're talking about?  Where would you put watching a baseball game in that category?  Good or evil?

If you are watching the New York Yankees... that's good.
If you are watching NL teams... that's bad.
If in the World Series you do not root for the AL team... that's bad.
If in the All-Star game you root for the AL stars... that's good.
Reply
#98
(06-19-2011, 01:37 AM)Gregory I Wrote: Trent trumps Suarez. Just like that. ;D

THe Catechism of the COuncil of Trent ITSELF teaches what I have been saying: Trent taught that BOTH the DESIRE for baptism and baptism itself, are necessary for ALL for salvation.

We MUST desire baptism in order to be properly disposed (or the baptism becomes an act of sacrilege), and we must then be baptized to be saved. But the one who is disposed is not justified because of his disposition, Only the one ACTUALLY baptized. Trent taught thus, and the Catechism of Trent taught thus. THeologians, BOW.  ;D

I'm not sure if you're saying this in refutation of what I posted. What I posted pertained to the Limbo of the Infants which is not a salvific state. From the Thomistic view, this involves a deprivation of the Beatific Vision and a denial of the Kingdom of Heaven, but neither of which provide any source of sorrow or pain for the unbaptized infants. They enjoy perfect natural happiness within Limbo.

Now, if your post was attacking the theological concepts of "Baptism by Desire" or "Baptism by Blood", then the Council of Trent itself contradicts that. Are you a Feeneyite? Here are the words of Trent itself:

Council of Trent, VI Session - Ch. IV Wrote:And this translation, since the promulgation of the Gospel, cannot be effected, without the laver of regeneration, or the desire thereof, as it is written; unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Ghost, he cannot enter into the Kingdom of God.

Trent does not mean by "desire" a simple desire of receiving baptism or even a resolution to do so. It means an act of perfect charity or contrition, including, at least implicitly, the will to do all things necessary for salvation and thus especially to receive baptism. When procuring this sacrament, if it proves to be an utter impossibility with all avenues and means being totally exhausted, then this perfect desire does indeed provide the graces of Baptism by Water. However, part of this perfect desire includes the obligation to receive Baptism by Water if/when it becomes a possibility. As a side note, since this perfect desire requires a perfectly contrite will and a firm act of volition, only those who have reached the age of reason are capable of receiving the baptism of desire.
Reply
#99
(06-22-2011, 01:36 AM)Joshua Wrote:
(06-19-2011, 01:37 AM)Gregory I Wrote: Trent trumps Suarez. Just like that. ;D

THe Catechism of the COuncil of Trent ITSELF teaches what I have been saying: Trent taught that BOTH the DESIRE for baptism and baptism itself, are necessary for ALL for salvation.

We MUST desire baptism in order to be properly disposed (or the baptism becomes an act of sacrilege), and we must then be baptized to be saved. But the one who is disposed is not justified because of his disposition, Only the one ACTUALLY baptized. Trent taught thus, and the Catechism of Trent taught thus. THeologians, BOW.  ;D

I'm not sure if you're saying this in refutation of what I posted. What I posted pertained to the Limbo of the Infants which is not a salvific state. From the Thomistic view, this involves a deprivation of the Beatific Vision and a denial of the Kingdom of Heaven, but neither of which provide any source of sorrow or pain for the unbaptized infants. They enjoy perfect natural happiness within Limbo.

Now, if your post was attacking the theological concepts of "Baptism by Desire" or "Baptism by Blood", then the Council of Trent itself contradicts that. Are you a Feeneyite? Here are the words of Trent itself:

Council of Trent, VI Session - Ch. IV Wrote:And this translation, since the promulgation of the Gospel, cannot be effected, without the laver of regeneration, or the desire thereof, as it is written; unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Ghost, he cannot enter into the Kingdom of God.

Trent does not mean by "desire" a simple desire of receiving baptism or even a resolution to do so. It means an act of perfect charity or contrition, including, at least implicitly, the will to do all things necessary for salvation and thus especially to receive baptism. When procuring this sacrament, if it proves to be an utter impossibility with all avenues and means being totally exhausted, then this perfect desire does indeed provide the graces of Baptism by Water. However, part of this perfect desire includes the obligation to receive Baptism by Water if/when it becomes a possibility. As a side note, since this perfect desire requires a perfectly contrite will and a firm act of volition, only those who have reached the age of reason are capable of receiving the baptism of desire.


This.
Reply
(06-22-2011, 01:17 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 01:07 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 01:04 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 01:00 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:25 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:22 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:21 AM)wulfrano Wrote:
(06-22-2011, 12:12 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote: To answer very simply the question of "why do people blame God when bad things happen?"

Because we are prideful and search for immediate and temporal comforts to our consternation instead of trusting in God.  Also, a "bad thing" must be evaluated and seen if it is really bad.  We see inconveniences to our social lives as cataclysmic events indicative of end times.  Human narcissism and self-centeredness knows no boundaries.  I'm sure some women blame God if they get pregnant.  We blame God because it is too humbling to acknowledge our own shortcomings (in the case that an event truly is "bad") and in the situations where there is no one to blame (of which there are many) it is easier to blame God than to trust in His providence.

It's a matter of perspective.  So-called bad things that happen are sometimes not bad at all, as subsequent developments may show.  My point is that everything is good, except sin.

Except for those things that are neutral.


What things are neutral?

Quite a few.  TV, moderate drinking, playing sports, talking about the weather. 

I don't want to disappoint you.... but.... everything we consciously and voluntarily do is either good or bad.

I'm not so sure about that.  Assuming that good= spiritually edifying and bad=spiritually destroying or hurtful?  Is this what we're talking about?  Where would you put watching a baseball game in that category?  Good or evil?

If you are watching the New York Yankees... that's good.
If you are watching NL teams... that's bad.
If in the World Series you do not root for the AL team... that's bad.
If in the All-Star game you root for the AL stars... that's good.

Ha! 
More Catholic Discussion: http://thetradforum.com/

Go thy ways, old Jack;
die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be
not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a
shotten herring. There live not three good men
unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and
grows old: God help the while! a bad world, I say.
I would I were a weaver; I could sing psalms or any
thing. A plague of all cowards, I say still.
Reply




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