Observations on the SSPX
#1
I seem to notice that the SSPX tends to gravitate towards rural areas. This can be shown by St Mary's, Post Falls,ID and in their Georgia Mass center among other places.

Why is it that they do not gravitate towards city centers and or their suburbs? They can attract more people to their Mass centers by doing that then being in less populated areas.
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#2
The SSPX church I attend is right smack dab in the middle of the city....well almost in the middle.
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#3
Both chapels in my city are in the boonies.  Perhaps land cost is an issue?  It's far more affordable to purchase outside of the major Metro areas.
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#4
(06-16-2011, 12:35 PM)LuminousPax Wrote: Both chapels in my city are in the boonies.  Perhaps land cost is an issue?  It's far more affordable to purchase outside of the major Metro areas.

Ya, my guess is costs too. It only makes sense to be as close to as many people as possible...
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#5
St Vincent de Paul, Kansas City, MO is pretty much in the centre of the metro area.

[Image: 31441fa.jpg]
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#6
From what I've heard, the conciliar authorities will absolutely not sell their churches to the SSPX. This undoubtedly has something to do with the locations of some SSPX chapels.

Churches that have been sold to the SSPX by the conciliar church happened through a third party that represented the SSPX while completely unbeknownst to the conciliar authority - I heard this from the pulpit.
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#7
(06-16-2011, 01:34 PM)Stubborn Wrote: From what I've heard, the conciliar authorities will absolutely not sell their churches to the SSPX. This undoubtedly has something to do with the locations of some SSPX chapels.

Churches that have been sold to the SSPX by the conciliar church happened through a third party that represented the SSPX while completely unbeknownst to the conciliar authority - I heard this from the pulpit.

IIRC, that's exactly what happened with St Vincent de Paul. Smile
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#8
[img][/img]

http://www.flickr.com/photos/twiga_swala/2424268308/

This is the magnificent St Joseph Church in Brussels, in the heart of the parliamentary and European district. It used to be the National Church of Belgium (before the construction of the "Koekelberg Basilica"). I think you can't get it much more urban than this. True, the FSSPX had to be somewhat "creative" in order to purchase it.
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#9
(06-16-2011, 04:08 PM)Eurotrad Wrote: [img][/img]

http://www.flickr.com/photos/twiga_swala/2424268308/

This is the magnificent St Joseph Church in Brussels, in the heart of the parliamentary and European district. It used to be the National Church of Belgium (before the construction of the "Koekelberg Basilica"). I think you can't get it much more urban than this. True, the FSSPX had to be somewhat "creative" in order to purchase it.
 

I am referring in this thread to the SSPX in the USA and their practices.

Maybe Archbishop Lefebvre and bishop Wiiliamson's back to the land may have more to do with this too.
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#10
(06-16-2011, 12:28 PM)a83192 Wrote: I seem to notice that the SSPX tends to gravitate towards rural areas. This can be shown by St Mary's, Post Falls,ID and in their Georgia Mass center among other places.
How valid is this observation? Are you only noticing the rural ones or did you look at the numbers and compare them?

Quote:Why is it that they do not gravitate towards city centers and or their suburbs? They can attract more people to their Mass centers by doing that then being in less populated areas.
Even if it is a valid observation, it is only a problem if the chapels are empty. If they are full, then they are where they should be.

They are a priestly fraternity not a business. They can't spring up chapels in new locations and have them staffed. Priests are not people you can just hire and train.


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