Catholic communities
#21
historically I live in the same neighborhood as my Church or close enough to walk to it, and that is done on purpose.  

I think if you build it, people will come.  

And a town will be run by a town council, the top families will be present to make decisions concerning the community, elderman (and dare I say elderwomen too, I am that radical gasp) and as a community grows in size, then adjustment will be made to the governing structure that will be most effective for the community identity whether through an assembly or strong hand mayor system, it depends on what is needed.    
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#22
(07-08-2011, 01:17 AM)mikemac Wrote: You know there are nations within a nation here in Canada.  Some of the Native bands are recognized as a nation within the nation of Canada.  And I am pretty sure Quebec is now recognized as a nation within the nation of Canada.  I can't see why there couldn't eventually be a Traditional Catholic nation within the country of Canada if a bunch of Trads put their heads together.  It's a big country.

yea, but why would anyone move to Canada? :P
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#23
Yeah, I guess your right.  It was a bad idea.  :laughing:
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#24
Christ centered is appealing.  Priest centered is not.  And, I fear, that's what it would very quickly become.
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#25
Aren't the Traditional Latin Mass Carmelite Monks who by the way use the 1937 Carmelite Missal (last time is was updated prior to the Novus Ordo)  intending on building a Catholic village not far from Yellowstone National Park?
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#26
(07-08-2011, 01:09 AM)Mac_Giolla_Bhrighde Wrote: HK would have to confirm or deny this, but from what I read Ave Maria ran into trouble, because non Catholics started moving into the town and refused to abide by Catholic morality. One good example was the court case on overturning the ban on selling prono magazines in convience stores in the town. Best one could do is make sure the convience store is owned by a Catholic who will ban the material on their own accord.

I don't really know anything about that. I was only around for half a year, at that was during the town's first year in business.

Obviously, you can't legally allow only Catholics to buy real estate in any given area in the U.S. The best you can do, really, is market that town to faithful Catholics and hope as many of them as possible move in. I suspect that since orthodox Catholics are poorer than usual, and the real estate in Ave Maria was probably more expensive than usual, and the cost of the university was astronomical (in my opinion), then over time you might have more rich secular yuppies or old retired folks moving in than Catholics who are really interested in the idea of Ave Maria.
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#27
(07-08-2011, 11:24 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
(07-08-2011, 01:09 AM)Mac_Giolla_Bhrighde Wrote: HK would have to confirm or deny this, but from what I read Ave Maria ran into trouble, because non Catholics started moving into the town and refused to abide by Catholic morality. One good example was the court case on overturning the ban on selling prono magazines in convience stores in the town. Best one could do is make sure the convience store is owned by a Catholic who will ban the material on their own accord.

I don't really know anything about that. I was only around for half a year, at that was during the town's first year in business.

Obviously, you can't legally allow only Catholics to buy real estate in any given area in the U.S. The best you can do, really, is market that town to faithful Catholics and hope as many of them as possible move in. I suspect that since orthodox Catholics are poorer than usual, and the real estate in Ave Maria was probably more expensive than usual, and the cost of the university was astronomical (in my opinion), then over time you might have more rich secular yuppies or old retired folks moving in than Catholics who are really interested in the idea of Ave Maria.

Are traditionalists in America generally in a lower socio-economic class? I think almost a third of the people at my Latin Mass parish must have university degrees and hold down good jobs.
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#28
(07-08-2011, 11:45 PM)Aragon Wrote: Are traditionalists in America generally in a lower socio-economic class? I think almost a third of the people at my Latin Mass parish must have university degrees and hold down good jobs.

I was talking mainly about the sorts of Catholics who would send their kids to Ave Maria University, some of whom may be trads but most are "orthodox neo-Catholics", I guess.

1.) more children means more mouths to feed,

2.) that also means more kids to pay for college,

3.) private Catholic colleges like Ave Maria University are far more expensive than public colleges, and

4.) those kids are getting liberal arts degrees and growing up to take low-paying jobs like being schoolteachers or stay-at-home moms. LOL. So they are basically white collar families with lots of debt and little income, except for the ones who become doctors and lawyers.


I am, of course, aware that many traditionalists encourage their kids to join the military, get blue collar trade jobs or go to state universities. Myself, I've done all three in addition to AMU. But either way, living at Ave Maria doesn't look cheap.
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#29
Anyone live near that part of Arkansas?
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#30
(07-02-2011, 02:13 AM)Aragon Wrote: There seem to be a few Catholic communities in America. There's St. Mary's in Kansas, Ave Maria and I recently came across this: http://www.staroftheseavillage.com/

Does anyone have any experience with these townships? Good idea or bad idea?

The Society of St. John was planning to start such a community a while back, but they had other issues...

With regard to Tom Monaghan, anyone know if he's still trying to build that Catholic city, or has it been put on hold for now?



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