Does Anybody Know About This??
#1
Prior to Vatican II, Anglo-Catholics published a Missal in the vernacular an exact copy of the Missal of The Old Mass. The only way you could tell it was not Roman was its reference to the Pope as Pastor Inter Pares and lack of Imprimatur. Fr. Black of SSPX could elucidate further on that situation.

Latterly, Anglicans appear to have been more NOM orientated, or, 'Prayer Book'.

If they adopted the 1962 Missal in the vernacular that would certainly get up the nose of the Diocesan commissars.


Does anybody know Father Black of the SSPX and where he can be contacted?  Also  does anybody know the address of the group of this "Anglican Ordinariate" who are going to decide what mass they use , I think this is very important in restoring Tradition.
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#2
There's not just one Anglican Ordinariate. There's currently one in England and Wales, and another that's in the process of being erected in the United States. My home parish has been a part of the "Anglican Use" of the Roman Rite since 1980, though. It will move from the local archdiocese's authority to the Ordinariate (of the United States) once all the paperwork is finished.

You are talking about the Anglican Missal, most likely. I believe my pastor used that back when he was still Episcopal/Church of England. The current book used for the morning Masses now is the Book of Divine Worship. This is the normal book for Anglican Use churches in the U.S., but I've heard the new Ordinariate churches in England are using mainly the Novus Ordo.
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#3
There seems to be an endless orgy of masses coming out of this heretical sect which has returned to union with Rome. I believe the only Traditional Roman Rite in English is the one that should be used. Using Cramner or De-Cramnerized  gives a sort of validity to a group of heretics who were never given a commission from God to create a liturgy. If your coming in union with Rome leave your Anglicanism behind!!
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#4
Salus,

Unfortunately I cannot answer your specific questions.  However, there was a vibrant thread with regard to these traditionally-minded Anglicans becoming a part of the Catholic Church.  Many of us were surprised that Cranmer was making a cameo appearance in the American Ordinariate (in some places):

http://catholicforum.fisheaters.com/inde...367.0.html


Here is a link to the tread containing the 1526 Sarum Rite, translated into English.  There is also a mention of HK's regal wedding reception:

http://catholicforum.fisheaters.com/inde...770.0.html


English culture is so rich that it is a crime against humanity to lock away its Rites in favor of Novus Ordo/Cranmer.
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#5
I'm not interested in English culture at this point. All i want is a traditional roman rite mass in the English vernacular(Which is a concession by the way)  We were told that these people were traditionalists and wanted back in union with Rome. They must break with anything they created and return to the Mass that jesus's only church created.
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#6
(07-03-2011, 10:01 PM)salus Wrote: I'm not interested in English culture at this point. All i want is a traditional roman rite mass in the English vernacular(Which is a concession by the way)  We were told that these people were traditionalists and wanted back in union with Rome. They must break with anything they created and return to the Mass that jesus's only church created.

I don't think you were getting what kingtheoden was saying. He was talking about the Sarum Missal, which was the Mass of Henry VIII's, Cardinal Wolsey's and Saint Thomas More's era before the Reformation. Queen Mary I restored its use during her reign. The Sarum Missal is older than the Missal of the Council of Trent. It is counted among the traditional forms of the Roman Rite.
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#7
WAs the Sarum Missal for all of England or was it for a particular diocese?
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#8
(07-04-2011, 12:27 AM)salus Wrote: WAs the Sarum Missal for all of England or was it for a particular diocese?

It originated as the Missal for the see of Salisbury (Sarum was the Latin name of that city) in the 11th century. By the time of Henry VIII, though, it had become the dominant liturgical usage for all of England. The Book of Common Prayer retains a lot of the Sarum Missal's influence, such as in the famous language of the marriage rites.
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#9
OK bring back the Sarum Missal then. Was it  offered in Latin back then exclusively, and would it be wise for the Anglicans coming back in to use the Sarum Missal today except in English.
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#10
(07-04-2011, 12:26 PM)salus Wrote: OK bring back the Sarum Missal then. Was it  offered in Latin back then exclusively, and would it be wise for the Anglicans coming back in to use the Sarum Missal today except in English.
There were many Latin liturgical rites in use. Only some are used now.

Like all Latin rites, it was in Latin.

What is the problem with the Anglican Use?

Your personal paranoia about it is not a valid reason to reject it as an option.

There were and are attempts to revive it, but they haven't worked out well so far.

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