Earth IS Center of Universe?
#11
Why wouldn't the Earth be the Centre of the Universe?
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#12
(07-06-2011, 12:59 PM)salus Wrote: I was told by a very well respected physicist that it depends where your measuring whether heliocentrism or geocentrism is true.

I have hear that all rocket science uses geocentrism in its math and calculations.  Needs confiming tho...
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#13
the earth is the centre of the universe
it is where r the incarnation occured. no small beans God being born a wee poor babe on this wee lonely rock.
it is where God was crucified, died and resurected.
thats more then enough to make this wee rok the centre of the universe
sip
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#14
(07-06-2011, 02:30 PM)devotedknuckles Wrote: the earth is the centre of the universe
it is where r the incarnation occured. no small beans God being born a wee poor babe on this wee lonely rock.
it is where God was crucified, died and resurected.
thats more then enough to make this wee rok the centre of the universe
sip

amen
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#15
The math for interplanetary travel doesn't depend on geocentrism, or heliocentrism, unless your a Nasa engineer and forget to convert mm to inches like they did and send the spacecraft to Alha Centauri instead of the moon. Moreover we can not determine whch it is unless we can escpe the solar system and observe it as a whole. Fat chance. DK has it right, this wee rock was graced with the greatest of all miracles.

tim
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#16
(07-06-2011, 03:39 PM)timoose Wrote: Moreover we can not determine whch it is unless we can escpe the solar system and observe it as a whole.

What additional information would that give you?  You could choose either one as a fixed reference point.  But it makes far more sense to use the sun as the fixed reference point in viewing the solar system.  And you could choose our sun as the fixed reference point of our galaxy, but that wouldn't make much sense either.
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#17
(07-06-2011, 04:22 PM)cgraye Wrote:
(07-06-2011, 03:39 PM)timoose Wrote: Moreover we can not determine whch it is unless we can escpe the solar system and observe it as a whole.

What additional information would that give you?  You could choose either one as a fixed reference point.  But it makes far more sense to use the sun as the fixed reference point in viewing the solar system.  And you could choose our sun as the fixed reference point of our galaxy, but that wouldn't make much sense either.

You can define "center" in many ways, but if we mean "the focal point around which everything happens," then we can say for sure that the center of the *solar system* (not the universe) is the sun.

But the center of the universe itself?  Can't say.  Every point is expanding from every other point, there is no focal or central point from the view of expansion.  And the earth goes around the sun, but lots of objects go around lots of objects, which all rotate, and they are clustered into galaxies which also rotate and revolve around each other ... and there's no center to it all.

Spiritually, of course the Earth is where God put us whom he created in His image, and Earth is where he redeemed us, so it is the center.

But from an impersonal physical point of view, there is no center.  Just like there's no center on the surface of a sphere.
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#18
(07-06-2011, 01:47 PM)Heinrich Wrote:
(07-06-2011, 12:40 PM)richness of tradition Wrote: First I've ever heard of this:

'Some Catholics maintain Galileo was wrong':

http://www.vancouversun.com/technology/S...story.html

I am one of them.

As am I.
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#19
Really, does it matter? I would think that there are more important things to worry about! And besides, speculation in matters such as this only lead to fanatical anathema's being hurled about and divisions among the faithful multiplied.
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#20
There are two separate but related issues in this debate.

The first is whether the Earth is the center of the universe.  This could be true both physically and spiritually and does not necessarily depend on the motion of objects within the universe.  I don't think that this issue is the one that is the subject of much controversy.

The second subject is specifically the motion of objects in the universe.  This is a point about which many people fail to see the importance of Galileo's work.  Galileo's important contribution was to start people on the path to realizing that the motion of planetary objects is defined by other forces, specifically by what came to be described as gravity.  This was the true revolution.  Earlier astronomers had systems with the Earth as the center of the solar system, but the problem is that no known physical phenomenon will cause planets to move in the very strange paths needed  for the earth to be at the solar system's center.  The most obvious being the sun rotating around the earth.  The laws of physics hold that objects of less mass will revolve around objects of larger mass.  For the geocentric model of the solar system to be correct there must be a multitude of varying physical laws all over our solar system to get each planet and the sun moving around the earth.  This is the major issue that Sungenis fails to see and that the scientific community also failed to understand before Galileo's time.
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