25th March
#1
Today I discovered that the 25th March was the day when the new year used to be celebrated here (hundreds of years ago), on the feast of the conception of Christ.

When did it become January 1st? And do any of you commemorate the feast in this way?
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#2
Here being where out of curiosity?
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#3
Hah, sorry. "Here" being Malta.
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#4
(07-12-2011, 10:10 AM)Melita Wrote: When did it become January 1st? And do any of you commemorate the feast in this way?

It's actually kind of a complicated answer!  The Romans traditionally celebrated New Years on January 1st, but Christianity saw this as a pagan holiday and moved the start of the year to Christmas day.  At some point in the middle ages, new years was shifted to Easter.  

By the 16th century the Julian Calendar instituted by Julius Caesar had become very deficient as it was running 10 days behind schedule!  So on January 1, 1582 Pope Gregory XIII instituted the aptly named Gregorian Calendar which established January 1 once again as the start of the new year.

However, Protestants saw this as blasphemous and refused to accept the Popish calendar!  However, the Gregorian Calender was better and gradually became the dominant calendar even in Protestant nations.  In 1752 Britain was among the last hold-outs to adopt the Gregorian Calendar.  During the period between 1582 and 1752, in English society it became common to note the period between Jan 1. and Easter using both calendars! Thus what we would describe as January 1, 1700, an Englishman would call January 1, 1700/1701.  

However Russia and Greece didn't adopt the new calendars until the 20th century!
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#5
(07-12-2011, 10:13 AM)Melita Wrote: Hah, sorry. "Here" being Malta.

I love Malta...been twice.Have you ever visited//heard of the vast underground tunnel network?
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#6
(07-12-2011, 10:21 AM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 10:10 AM)Melita Wrote: When did it become January 1st? And do any of you commemorate the feast in this way?

It's actually kind of a complicated answer!  The Romans traditionally celebrated New Years on January 1st, but Christianity saw this as a pagan holiday and moved the start of the year to Christmas day.  At some point in the middle ages, new years was shifted to Easter.  

By the 16th century the Julian Calendar instituted by Julius Caesar had become very deficient as it was running 10 days behind schedule!  So on January 1, 1582 Pope Gregory XIII instituted the aptly named Gregorian Calendar which established January 1 once again as the start of the new year.

However, Protestants saw this as blasphemous and refused to accept the Popish calendar!  However, the Gregorian Calender was better and gradually became the dominant calendar even in Protestant nations.  In 1752 Britain was among the last hold-outs to adopt the Gregorian Calendar.  During the period between 1582 and 1752, in English society it became common to note the period between Jan 1. and Easter using both calendars! Thus what we would describe as January 1, 1700, an Englishman would call January 1, 1700/1701.  

However Russia and Greece didn't adopt the new calendars until the 20th century!

You are a profound googler.  genius would be proud.
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#7
(07-12-2011, 03:50 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 10:21 AM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 10:10 AM)Melita Wrote: When did it become January 1st? And do any of you commemorate the feast in this way?

It's actually kind of a complicated answer!  The Romans traditionally celebrated New Years on January 1st, but Christianity saw this as a pagan holiday and moved the start of the year to Christmas day.  At some point in the middle ages, new years was shifted to Easter.  

By the 16th century the Julian Calendar instituted by Julius Caesar had become very deficient as it was running 10 days behind schedule!  So on January 1, 1582 Pope Gregory XIII instituted the aptly named Gregorian Calendar which established January 1 once again as the start of the new year.

However, Protestants saw this as blasphemous and refused to accept the Popish calendar!  However, the Gregorian Calender was better and gradually became the dominant calendar even in Protestant nations.  In 1752 Britain was among the last hold-outs to adopt the Gregorian Calendar.  During the period between 1582 and 1752, in English society it became common to note the period between Jan 1. and Easter using both calendars! Thus what we would describe as January 1, 1700, an Englishman would call January 1, 1700/1701.  

However Russia and Greece didn't adopt the new calendars until the 20th century!

You are a profound googler.  genius would be proud.

Sadly I knew most of that off the top of my head. It's actually kind of important for some of the stuff I do. 
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#8
(07-12-2011, 03:53 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 03:50 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 10:21 AM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 10:10 AM)Melita Wrote: When did it become January 1st? And do any of you commemorate the feast in this way?

It's actually kind of a complicated answer!  The Romans traditionally celebrated New Years on January 1st, but Christianity saw this as a pagan holiday and moved the start of the year to Christmas day.  At some point in the middle ages, new years was shifted to Easter.  

By the 16th century the Julian Calendar instituted by Julius Caesar had become very deficient as it was running 10 days behind schedule!  So on January 1, 1582 Pope Gregory XIII instituted the aptly named Gregorian Calendar which established January 1 once again as the start of the new year.

However, Protestants saw this as blasphemous and refused to accept the Popish calendar!  However, the Gregorian Calender was better and gradually became the dominant calendar even in Protestant nations.  In 1752 Britain was among the last hold-outs to adopt the Gregorian Calendar.  During the period between 1582 and 1752, in English society it became common to note the period between Jan 1. and Easter using both calendars! Thus what we would describe as January 1, 1700, an Englishman would call January 1, 1700/1701.  

However Russia and Greece didn't adopt the new calendars until the 20th century!

You are a profound googler.  genius would be proud.

Sadly I knew most of that off the top of my head. It's actually kind of important for some of the stuff I do. 

You collect kitty cat calendars?
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#9
(07-12-2011, 03:56 PM)DrBombay Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 03:53 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 03:50 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 10:21 AM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 10:10 AM)Melita Wrote: When did it become January 1st? And do any of you commemorate the feast in this way?

It's actually kind of a complicated answer!  The Romans traditionally celebrated New Years on January 1st, but Christianity saw this as a pagan holiday and moved the start of the year to Christmas day.  At some point in the middle ages, new years was shifted to Easter.  

By the 16th century the Julian Calendar instituted by Julius Caesar had become very deficient as it was running 10 days behind schedule!  So on January 1, 1582 Pope Gregory XIII instituted the aptly named Gregorian Calendar which established January 1 once again as the start of the new year.

However, Protestants saw this as blasphemous and refused to accept the Popish calendar!  However, the Gregorian Calender was better and gradually became the dominant calendar even in Protestant nations.  In 1752 Britain was among the last hold-outs to adopt the Gregorian Calendar.  During the period between 1582 and 1752, in English society it became common to note the period between Jan 1. and Easter using both calendars! Thus what we would describe as January 1, 1700, an Englishman would call January 1, 1700/1701.  

However Russia and Greece didn't adopt the new calendars until the 20th century!

You are a profound googler.  genius would be proud.

Sadly I knew most of that off the top of my head. It's actually kind of important for some of the stuff I do. 

You collect kitty cat calendars?

I have been known to work with English documents written before 1752.  If you're looking at a document that says January 1, 1700....you need to be sure its actually the year 1700 its from, not 1701 or 1699! 

This gets kind of confusing because some of the English decided they would be cool and just adopt the Gregorian Calendar on their own before 1752...minus the addition of the extra days. 

Thus, when looking at documents dated between January 1 and March 25 it can sometimes be confusing to figure out what year the document is from!
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#10
(07-12-2011, 04:00 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 03:56 PM)DrBombay Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 03:53 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 03:50 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 10:21 AM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 10:10 AM)Melita Wrote: When did it become January 1st? And do any of you commemorate the feast in this way?

It's actually kind of a complicated answer!  The Romans traditionally celebrated New Years on January 1st, but Christianity saw this as a pagan holiday and moved the start of the year to Christmas day.  At some point in the middle ages, new years was shifted to Easter.  

By the 16th century the Julian Calendar instituted by Julius Caesar had become very deficient as it was running 10 days behind schedule!  So on January 1, 1582 Pope Gregory XIII instituted the aptly named Gregorian Calendar which established January 1 once again as the start of the new year.

However, Protestants saw this as blasphemous and refused to accept the Popish calendar!  However, the Gregorian Calender was better and gradually became the dominant calendar even in Protestant nations.  In 1752 Britain was among the last hold-outs to adopt the Gregorian Calendar.  During the period between 1582 and 1752, in English society it became common to note the period between Jan 1. and Easter using both calendars! Thus what we would describe as January 1, 1700, an Englishman would call January 1, 1700/1701.  

However Russia and Greece didn't adopt the new calendars until the 20th century!

You are a profound googler.  genius would be proud.

Sadly I knew most of that off the top of my head. It's actually kind of important for some of the stuff I do. 

You collect kitty cat calendars?

I have been known to work with English documents written before 1752.  If you're looking at a document that says January 1, 1700....you need to be sure its actually the year 1700 its from, not 1701 or 1699! 

This gets kind of confusing because some of the English decided they would be cool and just adopt the Gregorian Calendar on their own before 1752...minus the addition of the extra days. 

Thus, when looking at documents dated between January 1 and March 25 it can sometimes be confusing to figure out what year the document is from!

Well they're English so what do they know?  They can't even speak English properly.
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