25th March
#11
"Britain and the British Empire (including the eastern part of what is now the United States) adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752, by which time it was necessary to correct by 11 days. Wednesday, 2 September 1752 was followed by Thursday, 14 September 1752. Claims that rioters demanded "Give us our eleven days" grew out of a misinterpretation of a painting by William Hogarth. After 1753, the British tax year in Britain continued to operate on the Julian calendar and began on 5 April, which was the "Old Style" new tax year of 25 March."

Just 20 odd years before the Revolution.  I wonder if this had anything to do with it.
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#12
(07-12-2011, 03:53 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 03:50 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: You are a profound googler.  genius would be proud.

Sadly I knew most of that off the top of my head. It's actually kind of important for some of the stuff I do. 

Nyah, Nyah, I'm more of a geek than you are.  :laughing: I knew most of that off the top of my head too, and it has absolutely nothing to do with anything I've ever done in my life. I've just always had a fascination with Calendars for some reason.
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#13
(07-12-2011, 05:11 PM)mikemac Wrote: Just 20 odd years before the Revolution.  I wonder if this had anything to do with it.

No. 
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#14
(07-12-2011, 05:17 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 03:53 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(07-12-2011, 03:50 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: You are a profound googler.  genius would be proud.

Sadly I knew most of that off the top of my head. It's actually kind of important for some of the stuff I do. 

Nyah, Nyah, I'm more of a geek than you are.  :laughing: I knew most of that off the top of my head too, and it has absolutely nothing to do with anything I've ever done in my life. I've just always had a fascination with Calendars for some reason.

Especially kitty cat calendars no doubt.
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#15
An ooooooold thread around here mentioned this (I think), and what I remember from it is that supposedly people who paid rent were angry because they had to pay their entire month's rent even though they were missing out on 11 days of that month.  I'd also be angry if, even just once, I had to pay my rent on the first of the month, and then had to pay it again 19 days later.  That'd totally mess up a budget.

I like the idea of the new year being on Christmas, Easter, or on March 25th.  Or the 1st Sunday of Advent, I guess.  Seems very fitting for a Catholic society.

That reminds me, in The Lord of the Rings, after the destruction of the one ring on March 25th, that day was adopted as their new New Year's Day.  Just a coincidence, J. R. R.?  I doubt it.
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#16
(07-12-2011, 08:31 PM)Cassius_Longinus Wrote: An ooooooold thread around here mentioned this (I think), and what I remember from it is that supposedly people who paid rent were angry because they had to pay their entire month's rent even though they were missing out on 11 days of that month.  I'd also be angry if, even just once, I had to pay my rent on the first of the month, and then had to pay it again 19 days later.  That'd totally mess up a budget.

That's actually not true, at least in Britain. The law that adopted the Gregorian Calendar specifically said that loss of 11 days could not be used to force people to pay rents or other fees earlier than would have been the case under the old calendar.

Thus, in England to this day the Fiscal Year starts on April 5, which would have been March 25 or New Years Day under the Julian Calendar!   
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#17
The ancient Greeks celebrated their New Year on the Summer Solstice, which almost always occurs on June 21. Now, the Clash of the Titans movies make more sense!  ;) They must have changed their New Year's Day after they came into greater contact with the Egyptians(especially after Alexander the Great's conquests) who celebrated their New Year on the Summer Solstice, because evidently the ancient Greeks originally celebrated their New Year on the Winter Solstice.
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