The heresy of Americanism!
#91
(08-14-2012, 11:45 PM)Crusading Philologist Wrote: To reorient the discussion a little bit: to what extent does the virtue of piety require one to treat with reverence the constitutional tradition of his nation?

Regardless of how piety may have been used historically--indeed, the word derives from the Latin pietas which meant devotion or loyalty to gods, family, and fatherland--it seems idolatrous in today's English to apply that term to respect for government.

No good Catholic can but acknowledge that respect is due to one's legitimate rulers, one's legitimate laws, and even one's legitimate state (though not necessarily to other people's legitimate rulers, other people's legitimate laws, and other people's legitimate states). To call such respect piety, however, is almost to exalt the state to divine status, which is something of which one needs to be cautious.

Obviously, Americans ought to have a love for the Constitution (with all its flaws)--a love similar in nature (albeit less in degree) to that a child would have for a parent (with all his flaws), but that doesn't mean that we should call the former love "piety." Calling the latter love "filial piety" is really only acceptable because it's part of a fossilized expression, and even it can be misleading at times.
Reply
#92
Quote:Obviously, Americans ought to have a love for the Constitution

I strongly disagree. Do Catholics in Europe or Asia have to a "love" for their constitutions?
Reply
#93
(08-15-2012, 02:45 AM)Resurrexi Wrote:
(08-14-2012, 11:45 PM)Crusading Philologist Wrote: To reorient the discussion a little bit: to what extent does the virtue of piety require one to treat with reverence the constitutional tradition of his nation?


Obviously, Americans ought to have a love for the Constitution (with all its flaws)--a love similar in nature (albeit less in degree) to that a child would have for a parent (with all his flaws), but that doesn't mean that we should call the former love "piety." Calling the latter love "filial piety" is really only acceptable because it's part of a fossilized expression, and even it can be misleading at times.
I sure hope your not the type to say that the constitution is a living, breathing document that we should love.
A la Mark Levine.

I don't think there is a mention or reference of God anywhere in the Constitution.

Where there is no mention of God, there is no hope.

Reply
#94
Originalism cannot save the Constitution. Poison in 1790 is poison in 1990.

You are correct that the US Constitution does not mention God. This differentiates it from eg the Confederate Constitution.
Reply
#95
(08-15-2012, 03:07 AM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: Originalism cannot save the Constitution. Poison in 1790 is poison in 1990.

You are correct that the US Constitution does not mention God. This differentiates it from eg the Confederate Constitution.
Don't get me started..... :grin:
Reply
#96
(08-15-2012, 02:51 AM)Crusader_Philly Wrote:
Quote:Obviously, Americans ought to have a love for the Constitution

I strongly disagree. Do Catholics in Europe or Asia have to a "love" for their constitutions?

They try to pump that type of love into the masses, but government here (in Italy) is seen more as a necessary evil... a bit like condominium meetings. Sure the condominium rules are good and necessary, but Love thy Neighbor is way more important. That's the real social glue.

So we don't "love" our constitutions... Americans tend far more to love the system (the checks and balances, etc.), over here we love the culture. (the dialects, foods, fragrances, attitudes).


Reply
#97
Reply
#98
Gottmituns! Bitte! I was trying to say something profound and serious. That's it! I'm going for a cappuccino and then I'm gonna read the Italian Constitution... or better yet the European one that - completely forgot Gesù Cristo.

Preamble
HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF THE BELGIANS, THE PRESIDENT OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC, HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN OF DENMARK, THE PRESIDENT OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY, THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF ESTONIA, THE PRESIDENT OF THE HELLENIC REPUBLIC, HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF SPAIN, THE PRESIDENT OF THE FRENCH REPUBLIC, THE PRESIDENT OF IRELAND, THE PRESIDENT OF THE ITALIAN REPUBLIC, THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF CYPRUS... bla bla bla

DRAWING INSPIRATION from the cultural, religious and humanist inheritance of Europe, from which have developed the universal values of the inviolable and inalienable rights of the human person, freedom, democracy, equality and the rule of law...

Dat's hard stuff to love
Reply
#99
:LOL: :LOL: :LOL: :LOL:
Sorry. I had to.
Reply
(08-15-2012, 02:53 AM)GottmitunsAlex Wrote:
(08-15-2012, 02:45 AM)Resurrexi Wrote:
(08-14-2012, 11:45 PM)Crusading Philologist Wrote: To reorient the discussion a little bit: to what extent does the virtue of piety require one to treat with reverence the constitutional tradition of his nation?


Obviously, Americans ought to have a love for the Constitution (with all its flaws)--a love similar in nature (albeit less in degree) to that a child would have for a parent (with all his flaws), but that doesn't mean that we should call the former love "piety." Calling the latter love "filial piety" is really only acceptable because it's part of a fossilized expression, and even it can be misleading at times.
I sure hope your not the type to say that the constitution is a living, breathing document that we should love.

Like my coreligionist Justice Scalia, I support an enduring rather than living Constitution.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)